19 photos that show why Berlin is one of the best places to party in the world

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The House of the Weekend rooftop
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Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters

Ever since the Berlin Wall fell in 1989, nightlife and clubbing have become entrenched in the culture of the German capital, and the city has earned a partying reputation that it’s proud of.

As the New York Times described, “One aspect of reunification that no one would have predicted – the emergence of techno and a tenacious, do-it-yourself club scene – has turned out to be not a passing night-life fad, but a cornerstone of the city’s identity.”

DJs blast techno and house music to crowds who are solely there to dance. But it’s not just a techno city – Berlin offers plenty of spots for rooftop drinks, swing dancing, craft beers, late-night eats, and classic rock ‘n’ roll.


Zum schmutzigen Hobby is a popular dance club that’s located in a former fire station. Here, DJ Olga Wodka plays pop songs for a packed crowd.

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Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters

Swing dancers teach a class at the Claerchens Ballhaus, a dance hall located in the central district of Mitte. Claerchens Ballhaus originally opened more than 100 years ago, and was run by the same family for almost 90 years. Much of the decor still has an antique, untouched look.

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Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters

The Bassy Club defines its vibe as “strictly before 1969,” featuring music that’s a mix of blues, soul, country, and rock ‘n’ roll.

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Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters

Enjoy drinks and dinner before a night of dancing on the Flutgraben canal, in an area that has more recently blossomed into a nightlife district.

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Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters

The Admiralsbruecke bridge is also busy with locals and tourists enjoying the sunset, warm weather, and street musicians during the summer months.

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Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters

Tourists and locals alike stop into “spaeties” (late-night convenience stores), which sell alcohol for cheaper than most of the surrounding clubs.

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Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters

Lea, pictured, has owned and operated the punk club Wild at Heart with her husband for over 20 years. Live bands play here regularly.

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Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters

Currywurst (curried sausage) is a popular late-night snack on the streets of Berlin.

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Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters

Petra works behind the bar at Trinkteufel, a gritty punk bar. Open non-stop from Friday through Monday morning, Trinkteufel attracts a range of people, from old punks to tourists, to artists, and retirees.

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Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters

For a more glamorous setting, Solar bar provides a gorgeous view of Berlin.

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Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters

The House of the Weekend rooftop bar serves drinks starting at 7 p.m. Reuters photographer Hannibal Hanschke describes the scene: “The terrace of Weekend beside the TV tower feels like real Berlin. High above the streets, it’s a perfect place to catch the sunset.”

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Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters

RAW, an old graffiti-covered train-repair site in the eastern part of Berlin, was once under Communist rule, but it’s now home to clubs, bars, and beer gardens.

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Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters

DJ Senai Gueler and his friends celebrate at Amano, a rooftop bar in the Mitte district that attracts artists and celebrities of Berlin nightlife.

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Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters

Street performers also grace stages at bars, clubs, and music venues around Berlin.

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Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters

The Duncker Club is known for its wide variety of music. Mondays are for gothic, post-punk death rock, while pop is played Thursday nights.

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Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters

Source: My Destination Berlin


If you’re good at simultaneously roller skating and dancing, the Roller Skate Disko at the club SO36 is the place to go. Located in Berlin’s Kreuzberg district, the club originally made its name as a punk venue, but it now hosts a variety of music.

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Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters

The outdoor club Else serves beer and pretzels, and is located between railway lines and a busy street with six lanes of traffic by the river Spree.

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Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters

Rauschgold calls itself “the bar where the night never ends.” Here, partygoers toast after a drag show.

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Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters

After a long night out, people wait for trains home or to another club. The S-Bahn and U-Bahn trains run throughout the night in Berlin on weekends, keeping the city moving and continuing the party.

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Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters