Father of the suspected YouTube shooter reportedly told police his daughter was ‘angry’ with the company, warned that she might travel to its office

A screenshot of a video from an account that appeared to belong to Nasim Aghdam.

caption
A screenshot of a video from an account that appeared to belong to Nasim Aghdam.
source
Screenshot via DailyMotion

  • The father of Nasim Aghdam, the suspect in the shooting at YouTube’s headquarters, said that she was angry at the video platform. She had been missing for several days before the shooting.
  • Ismail Aghdam said he warned law-enforcement officials that his daughter might travel to the company.
  • Police reportedly made contact with Aghdam on the night before the shooting.

The father of Nasim Aghdam, the suspect in the shooting at YouTube’s headquarters, reportedly said that she was angry at the video platform and believed it was discriminating against her.

She was missing for several days before the shooting took place.

Ismail Aghdam reportedly contacted law-enforcement officials in the San Diego area on Monday because he was concerned about her grievances toward YouTube, according to a local CBS News affiliate, KCAL-9. Aghdam lived in San Diego.

Aghdam said his daughter had told her family she was angry at YouTube, according to the San Jose newspaper, Mercury News. She “hated” the company and believed the platform was discriminating against her, the newspaper reported.

He said law-enforcement officials later contacted him and said they had found his daughter sleeping inside her car in Mountain View, California, about 30 miles southeast of YouTube’s headquarters, in San Bruno.

The man said he told police that his daughter may be traveling to the company’s offices.

Mountain View Police spokeswoman Katie Nelson confirmed to Mercury News that “officers made contact with the woman after the license plate of her vehicle matched that of a missing person out of Southern California.”

Aghdam previously criticized YouTube’s move to demonetize certain channels. She took issue specifically with what she believed to be a reduction in viewership on her videos.

“There is no equal growth opportunity on YOUTUBE or any other video sharing site, your channel will grow if they want to!!!!!,” a website that appeared to be linked to her Instagram page said.

On Tuesday evening several of her social-media accounts, including her YouTube channels, were deactivated.