Olivia Munn calls out Dave Chappelle for being ‘tone deaf to the experiences of others’ with his Louis C.K. jokes

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  • Actress Olivia Munn said comedian Dave Chappelle’s recent jokes about the women who accused Louis C.K. of sexual misconduct were “tone deaf,” in an interview with The Hollywood Reporter.
  • Munn said Chappelle should show more empathy to victims of abuse and harassment.

Actress Olivia Munn has called out comedian Dave Chappelle for his “tone deaf” bit on Louis C.K.’s sexual misconduct scandal.

In Chappelle’s recent stand-up special “The Bird Revelation,” which premiered on Netflix New Year’s Eve, the comedian did an extended bit on the women who accused Louis C.K. of unwanted masturbation, calling them “weak” for letting C.K.’s behavior affect them – or in one woman’s case, stopping her from pursuing a career in comedy.

“You think if Louis C.K. jerked off in front of Dr. King, he’d be like, ‘I can’t continue this movement’?” Chappelle said in the special. “‘I’m sorry, but the freedom of black people must be stopped. I didn’t know this n—- was going to pull his d— out and jerk off like this. I thought we were going to get a couple of drinks and chill.’

“Show business is just harder than that,” Chappelle continued. “I hate to say it, y’all: They sound weak.” (Read a more thorough account of the bit here.)

In an interview with The Hollywood Reporter published Thursday, actress, model, and former “Daily Show” correspondent Munn said she did not find Chappelle’s jokes funny.

“It’s in poor taste, and it’s really tone deaf to the experiences of others,” Munn told THR. “And I think especially Chappelle, as a minority, should show more empathy for the experience of other people who are abused and belittled and pushed down. You don’t shy away from things, but you also don’t say it just to be mean, or just to get a laugh.”

Munn, who is involved in the Time’s Up initiative and publicly accused filmmaker Brett Ratner of sexual misconduct, said that while she believes that comedians exist to make light of dark situations, Chappelle crossed a line.

“We have to elevate each other. Elevate other women, minorities, and the LGBTQ,” Munn said. “That will be the big thing: to change history, get more opportunities and not only be known for the abuses that have happened to us.”