1 million calls were made to the Singapore police and SCDF last year, but only 6% were real emergencies

Non-emergency calls affect police work by preventing the 999 operator from answering other calls , which may include emergency cases.
The Straits Times

If you ever need to dial 999, please make sure it’s an emergency first.

Around 1.1 million calls were made to the Singapore Civil Defence Force (SCDF) and the Singapore Police Force (SPF) last year, but only 6 per cent were classified as urgent, the Ministry of Home Affairs’ Senior Parliamentary Secretary Amrin Amin has revealed.

A video published on Facebook by Amrin on Monday (August 5) showed the Sembawang GRC MP going behind the scenes at the SPF’s Police Operations Command Centre (POCC), where emergency calls in Singapore are taken.

Amrin spoke to ASP Wan Amir, the officer in-charge of POCC, who said that the police still receive emergency calls regarding complains about a neighbour’s wet laundry, and even about noise pollution cases.

The video also showed ASP Wan Amir receiving a call where a member of the public called to say that his room had a water leak, and was unsure of which agency to call for help.

Such “non-emergency case” calls have no immediate threat to life and property, he said.

Non-emergency calls affect police work by preventing the 999 operator from answering other calls , which may include emergency cases, he added.

Emergency cases are those that require immediate action or response by police officers, including crimes in progress, such as watching a burglary take place, or a fight breaking out on the street.

Earlier in July, a 36-year-old man was arrested for allegedly making at least four prank calls to the police and SCDF about a supposed fire or attempted suicide.

After responding to the calls, officers from the Bedok police division and SCDF established that no such fire or distressed person existed.

SPF warned that anyone found guilty of transmitting false messages can be fined up to $10,000, jailed for up to three years, or both.

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