Monthly Archives: November 2014

The most popular baby names in every US state

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Mike Lawrie / Getty Images

  • Every year around Mother’s Day, the Social Security Administration releases statistics on the popularity of baby names in the previous year.
  • On Thursday, it released the most popular baby names in each state and DC.

Last week, the Social Security Administration revealed that the most popular baby names in the US in 2017 were Liam and Emma.

On Thursday, the administration released the most popular names for baby boys and girls in each state and DC last year, based on its comprehensive database of applications for Social Security cards from new parents.

In addition to being the most popular name nationally, Liam was the most popular name for baby boys in 16 states:

most common boys names map v4

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Business Insider/Andy Kiersz, data from Social Security Administration

Emma, the most popular name for girls nationally, was the most popular name in half of the states:

most common girls names map

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Business Insider/Andy Kiersz, data from Social Security Administration

The mysterious death of a 35-year-old CDC commander who disappeared in February has been solved

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) headquarters in Atlanta.

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) headquarters in Atlanta.
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Thomson Reuters

  • CDC commander Timothy Cunningham left work on February 12 feeling ill, and was never heard from again.
  • He remained missing for more than six weeks before his body was recovered in an Atlanta river in April. He was still wearing his favorite pair of running shoes.
  • The Fulton County Medical Examiner ruled his cause of death suicide by drowning on Tuesday.

The mysterious disappearance of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Commander Timothy Cunningham ended tragically last month when a group of fishermen found his body in a muddy spot on the Chattahoochee River in northwest Atlanta, and alerted the police.

“We may never be able to tell you how he got into the river,” Maj. Michael O’Connor of the Atlanta Police Department said when the commander’s body was recovered in April.

The only thing police said they found in Cunningham’s pockets at the time were three crystals. He was also wearing his favorite running shoes. But there weren’t any running trails nearby, deepening the mystery of how he got in the water in the first place.

On Tuesday, the public health worker’s case was finally solved when the Fulton County Medical Examiner issued its final report. Cunningham’s death was ruled a drowning by suicide, the medical examiner’s office told Business Insider.

Timothy Cunningham.

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Timothy Cunningham.
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Atlanta Police Department

A Rising Star In Public Health

The 35-year-old commander had been a budding star at the nation’s leading public health agency, rising quickly through the ranks at the CDC and working on numerous public-health emergencies, including Superstorm Sandy, the Ebola outbreak, and the Zika outbreak. He was granted an early promotion to Commander last July.

But Atlanta Police Major O’Connor said at a news conference in February that Cunningham had recently been turned down for a promotion at work, and left the office feeling ill shortly after his supervisor explained why he’d been passed over.

The commander drove off that day and was never seen alive again, even as his car, credit and debit cards, keys, and cellphone were all recovered at his home, police said. He left his dog, Mr. Bojangles, home alone too.

“Tim never leaves Beau unattended,” Cunningham’s father, Terrell Cunningham, told NBC at the time of his son’s disappearance. “He just doesn’t do it.”

Cunningham had an impressive career in public health, and the Atlanta Business Chronicle named him one of 2017’s “40 under 40” in October. He held a master’s degree and a doctorate from Harvard’s School of Public Health.

Watch the stand-up comedy clip that reignited the Bill Cosby sexual-assault allegations

Hannibal Buress and Bill Cosby.

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Hannibal Buress and Bill Cosby.
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Andrew H. Walker; Ethan Miller/Getty

  • Bill Cosby on Thursday was found guilty of drugging and sexually assaulting a woman in 2004, and he faces up to 30 years in prison.
  • The sexual-assault allegations that brought Bill Cosby to trial were in part reignited by a 2014 stand-up bit in which the comedian Hannibal Buress joked about Cosby’s “rape.”
  • After footage of Buress’ joke went viral, numerous women came forward to accuse Cosby of sexual misconduct.

On Thursday, Bill Cosby, 80, was found guilty of drugging and sexually assaulting Andrea Constand in 2004, and he could face up to 30 years in prison.

The sexual-assault allegations that brought Cosby to trial were in part reignited by a 2014 stand-up comedy bit at a club in Philadelphia in which the comedian Hannibal Buress joked about Cosby’s “rape.”

Mocking Cosby, Buress said: “Pull your pants up, black people. I was on TV in the ’80s. I can talk down to you ’cause I had a successful sitcom.”

“Yeah, but you rape women, Bill Cosby,” Buress added, “so turn the crazy down a couple notches.”

Audience footage of Buress’ joke subsequently went viral. (Warning: There is explicit language used in the video.)

Many people on social media vilified Cosby, and several news outlets picked up the subject. Cosby also faced persistent criticism from other notable comedians, including Judd Apatow.

Numerous women have come forward to accuse Cosby of sexual misconduct.

Thursday’s verdict came after a two-week retrial during which prosecutors put five other women on the stand who testified that Cosby drugged and sexually assaulted them too. Constand’s was the only criminal case to arise from allegations from his more than 60 accusers.

Additional reporting by The Associated Press.