Monthly Archives: April 2015

The third royal baby has a name — here’s where Prince George, Princess Charlotte, and Prince Louis got their names

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Shayanne Gal/Business Insider

  • Kate Middleton and Prince William’s newborn son is named Louis Arthur Charles.
  • He will be referred to as Prince Louis of Cambridge.
  • Like his siblings Princess Charlotte and Prince George, his name holds a lot of meaning for the royal family.

Kate Middleton and Prince William’s new baby officially has a name.

The royal family is welcoming Louis Arthur Charles to their family.

Prince Louis is the third child of Kate Middleton – whose official styling is now Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge – and Prince William, Duke of Cambridge. The new baby is fifth in line to the British throne, behind his grandfather Prince Charles of Wales, his father Prince William, his brother, Prince George of Cambridge, and his sister, Princess Charlotte of Cambridge.

Like the names of his siblings, Louis’ name is chock full of meaning for the royal family.

There hasn’t ever been a King Louis of England – unless you count King Louis VIII‘s short stint back in 1216. It’s a name more popularly associated with the French monarchy. But it is a Windsor family name. Louis Mountbatten, Earl Mountbatten of Burma, was the uncle of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, and also the queen’s second cousin. He was killed in a 1979 bombing.

Arthur was the middle name of Queen Elizabeth’s father King George VI, and also the name of the legendary medieval king. And Charles is, of course, the name of Prince William’s father – as well as two previous English kings.

Prince George, whose first name comes from Queen Elizabeth’s father, King George VI, shares the middle name Louis with his baby brother, as well as the middle name Alexander, a masculine version of his great grandmother, Queen Elizabeth’s, middle name.

Princess Charlotte gets her first name from two places: It’s her aunt Pippa Middleton’s middle name, and it’s the feminine version of her grandfather, Prince Charles’, first name. Her middle names, Elizabeth and Diana, have straightforward sources: her great-grandmother Queen Elizabeth, and her late grandmother Princess Diana, Prince William’s mother.

What to do when you’re offered a job and you need more time to decide

Take some time to think.

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Take some time to think.
source
Sebastiaan ter Burg/Flickr

• Job offers can seriously complicate your life.

• Sometimes, you need more time to mull the opportunity over.

• But, at the same time, you don’t want to burn bridges by leaving the hiring manager hanging.

• Here are some tips on how to postpone accepting a job offer like a professional.

How can you delay accepting a job offer without burning bridges?

Landing a job offer is usually good news, but it can prove to be just as stressful as the process of searching for a new gig. Sometimes, it’s simply not immediately clear whether or not you should accept the opportunity. In those cases, it’s always better to take some time to think things over.

But what’s the best way of doing this without seriously ticking off the hiring manager?

“You’ve finally received that long-awaited job offer, but don’t want to jump at the opportunity – nor do you want to seem uninterested,” Lynn Taylor, a national workplace expert and the author of “Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant: How to Manage Childish Boss Behavior and Thrive in Your Job,” told Business Insider.

It’s quite a conundrum. So how do you politely stall to ultimately get what you want?

“It’s not uncommon for employers to ask for a response within 24 hours, but that doesn’t mean you must comply,” Taylor explained. “The company may try to push you to make a decision in a short period of time, but a little pushback is often expected, as daunting as that might seem with a prospective employer.”

She said even if you plan to take some time with your decision, you should always acknowledge the job offer promptly. “A general rule of thumb is that you can take two to three days for your final response,” she said. “If the employer is vague about the requested response time, you may have up to a week, but a lot depends on the circumstances.”

Most employers understand that you need time to think over the opportunity and that it’s an important decision. If they don’t and use hardball tactics, that should be a red flag.

Here are some steps to follow to help you bide time, but stay in the game:


Show excitement and gratitude

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Strelka/Flickr

You can be enthusiastic and gracious without giving an immediate response, Taylor said. “Let them know that you’re very appreciative of the offer, but would like a little time to make an informed decision.”


Understand the whole picture

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Sebastiaan ter Burg/Flickr

Are there remaining questions you must ask that will help tie up any loose ends? Have all compensation factors been addressed beyond salary, such as bonuses, medical, dental and vision coverage, vacation time, frequency of reviews, 401(k) plans, stock, a company phone, car, personal time off, training, education, and other perks? Have you evaluated the culture and things like your expected hours and commute time?

By asking for more time, you have created room to get more clarification, she explains.

Plus, asking questions is a good way to stall for time.


Ask for a specific amount of time

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Sebastiaan ter Burg/Flickr

Give a specific date: “I greatly appreciate this offer and I’m really excited about working with your company. I wonder if I could have until Wednesday to get back to you on this opportunity.”

“Stay true to your deadline, or risk the offer being withdrawn,” said Taylor.


Don’t be afraid to negotiate

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Sebastiaan ter Burg/Flickr

Nobody wants to jeopardize a hard-won job offer at the last minute. But would you even want to work for an employer that would rescind an opportunity because you asked for a little time?

“Remember that you are interviewing the company, too, and now is the time to get it right,” said Taylor.


Strategize with any other offers

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Sebastiaan ter Burg/Flickr

If you have another offer pending, and the second job offer – let’s call it job “B” – is the preferred one, you’re best served to put some diplomatic pressure on job B. “You want to let job B know upfront that you have another offer,” Taylor advised. “This is always better than accepting the first job, and then quitting once job B comes through.”

Also, if you’re asked whether you have job offers by job A, be honest – but don’t feel compelled to give details.


Don’t burn bridges

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Sebastiaan ter Burg/Flickr

No matter how you handle your pitch for more time, do it professionally, suggested Taylor. “The business world, your industry, and market are all small. Your hiring manager can likely reappear in your career, so put your best foot forward, especially when you refuse a position.”


Formally accept or turn down the job

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Sebastiaan ter Burg/Flickr

Never leave the employer hanging or assume they know you’re going to accept, since you once casually told the hiring manager you would take the job if you were to get it.

“When you’ve made your final decision, do it verbally, but make sure it’s in writing,” said Taylor. “You will likely be asked to sign an acceptance letter, but if you refuse the job, you should also follow up with a gracious email.”

Jacquelyn Smith wrote a previous version of this article.

What to do when you’re offered a job and you need more time to decide

Asking more questions is a good way to stall.

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Asking more questions is a good way to stall.
source
Flickr / Timothy Krause

We recently solicited readers to submit their most pressing career-related questions.

With the help of Lynn Taylor, a national workplace expert and the author of “Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant: How to Manage Childish Boss Behavior and Thrive in Your Job,” we’ve answered the following: “I was offered a new job and the company is asking for my final decision, but I need more time. What should I do?”

This is a situation many people find themselves in.

“You’ve finally received that long-awaited job offer, but don’t want to jump at the opportunity – nor do you want to seem uninterested,” says Taylor.

So how do you politely stall to ultimately get what you want?

“It’s not uncommon for employers to ask for a response within 24 hours, but that doesn’t mean you must comply,” she explains. “The company may try to push you to make a decision in a short period of time, but a little push back is often expected, as daunting as that might seem with a prospective employer.”

She says even if you plan to take some time with your decision, you should always acknowledge the job offer promptly. “A general rule of thumb is that you can take two to three days for your final response,” she says. “If the employer is vague about the requested response time, you may have up to a week, but a lot depends on the circumstances.”

Most employers understand that you need time to think over the opportunity and that it’s an important decision. If they don’t and use hardball tactics, that should be a red flag – and you may have just dodged a large bullet.

Here are some steps to follow to help you bide time, but stay in the game:

Show excitement and gratitude.You can be enthusiastic and gracious without giving an immediate response, Taylor says. “Let them know that you’re very appreciative of the offer, but would like a little time to make an informed decision.”

Understand the whole picture.Are there remaining questions you must ask that will help tie up any loose ends? Have all compensation factors been addressed beyond salary, such as bonuses, medical, dental and vision coverage, vacation time, frequency of reviews, 401(k) plans, stock, a company phone, car, personal time off, training, education, and other perks? Have you evaluated the culture and things like your expected hours and commute time? By asking for more time, you have created room to get more clarification, she explains.

Plus, asking questions is a good way to stall for time.

Ask for a specific amount of time.Give a specific date: “I greatly appreciate this offer and I’m really excited about working with your company. I wonder if I could have until Wednesday to get back to you on this opportunity.” “Stay true to your deadline, or risk the offer being withdrawn,” says Taylor.

Stall for time.

caption
Stall for time.
source
Shutterstock / Jack Frog

Don’t be afraid to negotiate.Nobody wants to jeopardize a hard-won job offer at the last minute. But would you even want to work for an employer that would rescind an opportunity because you asked for a little time? “Remember that you are interviewing the company, too, and now is the time to get it right,” says Taylor.

Strategize with any other offers.If you have another offer pending, and the second job offer – let’s call it job “B” – is the preferred one, you’re best served to put some diplomatic pressure on job B. “You want to let job B know upfront that you have another offer,” Taylor advises. “This is always better than accepting the first job, and then quitting once job B comes through.”

Also, if you’re asked whether you have job offers by job A, be honest – but don’t feel compelled to give details.

Ask for more time, then use it to think carefully about your decision.

caption
Ask for more time, then use it to think carefully about your decision.
source
Flickr / Michael Thurber

Don’t burn bridges.No matter how you handle your pitch for more time, do it professionally, suggests Taylor. “The business world, your industry and market are all small. Your hiring manager can likely reappear in your career, so put your best foot forward, especially when you refuse a position.”

Formally accept or turn down the job.Never leave the employer hanging or assume they know you’re going to accept, since you once casually told the hiring manager you would take the job if you were to get it.

“When you’ve made your final decision, do it verbally, but make sure it’s in writing,” says Taylor. “You will likely be asked to sign an acceptance letter, but if you refuse the job, you should also follow up with a gracious email.”

Readers: Want us to answer your questions related to your career or job search? Tweet Careers editor Jacquelyn Smith @JacquelynVSmith or email her at jsmith[at]businessinsider[dot]com, and we’ll do our best to answer them.

Marissa Mayer says her Google bosses ‘yelled at us until we became what they needed us to become’ — and it wasn’t a bad thing

It was about setting clear expectations, said Marissa Mayer, pictured.

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It was about setting clear expectations, said Marissa Mayer, pictured.
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Brian Ach/Getty Images

  • Yahoo’s former CEO is Marissa Mayer, who was one of the first employees at Google. Mayer was recently interviewed by The New York Times.
  • Mayer told The Times that she modeled her management style at Yahoo on Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin’s leadership strategies. One example is setting clear expectations for employees.
  • Still, Mayer wasn’t so well-liked or highly rated as CEO of Yahoo; while Page had a very high approval rating as CEO of Google.

Marissa Mayer, former CEO of Yahoo and one of the first employees at Google, just gave her first interview since leaving Yahoo.

Mayer, who parted ways with Yahoo in 2017 when the company was sold to Verizon, spoke with David Gelles for an installment of The New York Times’ Corner Office column. One of Mayer’s most interesting comments is that she tried to model her leadership style at Yahoo after Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin’s management style in the early days of Google.

Here’s Mayer: “Larry and Sergey just yelled at us until we became what they needed us to become, and get done what they needed to be done. And so I said, look, I’m going to just rinse and repeat that, hopefully with less yelling.”

Mayer said she brought in management coaches and mentors to help shape Yahoo’s management strategy.

She went on:

“I think you can have high expectations as a leader, and as long as they’re consistent and clearly communicated, a lot of people find that really inspiring. I always knew what Larry and Sergey wanted. I knew what good looked like to them, and so I never got discouraged by them saying, ‘Wait, I don’t think this is ready’ or ‘I think this is overly ready.'”

Mayer and Page were perceived very differently as CEOs of large tech companies

Mayer was probably wise to emulate Page’s leadership strategies: In 2015, he was the highest-rated CEO of a large company, according to Glassdoor. (That was back when Page was still CEO of Google; after a reorganization in 2015, he’s now CEO of Google’s parent company, Alphabet.)

Yet Mayer only cracked the top 50 on Glassdoor’s list of highest-rated CEOs once between 2013 and 2017. And in 2017, she was rated the least likable tech CEO, according to Owler.

Forbes reported in 2015 that Mayer was known among executives as a micromanager. “She would go line by line and decide on what date a contract should end,” a senior executive told Forbes, referring to the terms given to contractors and vendors.

Still, some former Yahoo employees praised Mayer’s leadership skill, such as Jelena Woehr, who wrote on Medium that Mayer always listened closely to employees’ concerns.

Mayer was vague in the interview with The Times about what she’s doing now: She’s working with a company called Lumi Labs and has “some ideas in the consumer space.”

Asked for her best tips on perseverance by Linkedin user Karen Lippman, Meyer said: “Develop a thick skin.”

Read the full interview at The New York Times »

These are the US states where people live the longest, healthiest lives — and the shortest

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REUTERS/Nacho Doce

  • Life expectancy increased in the US from 1990 to 2016. Today, overall average life expectancy is up to 78.9 years old.
  • But researchers are worried that increasingly, Americans are smoking and drinking too much, eating bad food, and suffering from more drug use disorders.
  • It’s all having an effect on how long people can live healthy, disability and disease-free lives.

Americans born today can expect to live to a ripe old age of nearly 79 years old.

Life expectancy in the US is nearly four years longer than it was back in 1990. But researchers say while Americans might live longer today than they used to, they’re not necessarily living much healthier lives.

That’s according to a new JAMA study that tracked the state of health in the US from 1990-2016. The study traced the prevalence of 333 different health problem causes and 84 risk factors for death over a 26 year period.

The researchers found that the average American born today can expect to live 67.7 years illness and injury-free, a healthy life expectancy average that’s just 2.4 years longer than it was in 1990.

The researchers are especially worried about growing rates of health problems like obesity and diabetes, as well as the prevalence of drug use disorders (including opioid addiction) and alcohol use. Other health issues on the rise in the US include cognitive diseases like Alzheimer’s and hearing loss, which are edging out what used to be some of the most common health issues in the country, like major depression, low back pain, and car crash injuries.

Lead study author Christopher Murray, who directs the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington has said before that obesity and substance use disorders are increasing health problems around the globe, and his most recent data shows us that the US is no exception to the trend.

In 1960, Americans had the highest life expectancy of any country in the world. But today, the US has plummeted to the bottom of the list of countries with a similar GDP and high average income, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation.

The number of years people can expect to live healthy, illness and injury-free lives in the US is over 70 years old in only two states: Minnesota and Hawaii. Take a look at where your state ranks.

healthy life expectancy in every state

source
Business Insider

Here’s the full list, in order from longest healthy life expectancy to shortest*.

  1. Minnesota – 70.3 years
  2. Hawaii – 70.1 years
  3. California – 69.9 years
  4. Washington – 69.1 years
  5. Vermont – 69 years
  6. Connecticut – 69 years
  7. Iowa – 68.9 years
  8. Massachusetts – 68.9 years
  9. Colorado – 68.9 years
  10. New Jersey – 68.8 years
  11. North Dakota – 68.8 years
  12. Nebraska – 68.8 years
  13. Wisconsin – 68.6 years
  14. New Hampshire – 68.5 years
  15. New York – 68.5 years
  16. South Dakota – 68.4 years
  17. Oregon – 68.4 years
  18. Illinois – 68.3 years
  19. Utah – 68.2 years
  20. Rhode Island 68.1 years
  21. Maine – 68 years
  22. Maryland – 68 years
  23. Virginia – 68 years
  24. Florida – 67.9 years
  25. Idaho – 67.9 years
  26. Kansas – 67.8 years
  27. Arizona – 67.7 years
  28. Montana – 67.7 years
  29. Texas – 67.4 years
  30. Wyoming – 67.4 years
  31. Washington, DC – 67.4 years
  32. North Carolina – 67.4 years
  33. Alaska – 67.3 years
  34. Delaware – 67.2 years
  35. Michigan – 67 years
  36. Nevada – 66.9 years
  37. Pennsylvania – 66.8 years
  38. Georgia – 66.6 years
  39. Missouri – 66.5 years
  40. New Mexico – 66.3 years
  41. Ohio – 66.1 years
  42. Indiana – 66 years
  43. South Carolina – 65.8 years
  44. Arkansas – 65.5 years
  45. Tennessee – 65.4 years
  46. Louisiana – 65 years
  47. Mississippi – 64.9 years
  48. Alabama – 64.6 years
  49. Oklahoma – 64.5 years
  50. Kentucky – 64.3 years
  51. West Virginia – 63.8 years

*This list includes Washington DC, which is why there are 51 entries.