Monthly Archives: July 2015

Opening Day is here after a slow MLB offseason where big name free agents didn’t get paid

A rough offseason for free agents is over.

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A rough offseason for free agents is over.
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Jamie Squire/Getty

  • Jake Arrieta and other MLB free agents waited longer to sign this offseason than in past years.
  • Eric Hosmer and JD Martinez are a couple of the many players who signed contracts for less than they are worth.
  • Teams are taking a new approach to free agents and shifting the market by spending less.

Baseball’s Opening Day has arrived after a slow offseason that produced chatter about low pay offered to free agents. The hot stove stayed cool and some of the game’s best stars earned below their pay grade.

So many players were still available in March that the players’ union (MLBPA) opened a spring training camp for free agents. Many of the players who inked new deals did so at a great discount for teams.

The lack of signings and devaluation of players who did sign shows a major shift. Although the cause is unknown, it is clear that players are not being paid as much. Team owners actively engaged in collusion against players in 1987 and whispers of the c word resurfaced this winter.

Even super agent Scott Boras wasn’t able to use his shrewd business tactics to sign players this offseason – and his clients, including Jake Arrieta, have suffered.

Boras’ roll call of clients who entered the 2017 offseason as free agents was a who’s who of MLB all-stars. Eric Hosmer won four of the last five AL Gold Gloves despite being an offense-first first baseman. JD Martinez is a feared slugger who was a valuable asset at last season’s trade deadline. Jake Arrieta has earned a well-deserved status as ace of the Chicago Cubs.

Martinez did eventually sign a deal – a contract for five years and $110 million – on February 19. Hosmer took an eight-year deal with an average annual value of $18 million, but had to wait until spring training started. Arrieta eventually came to the Phillies in mid-March.

Eric Hosmer finally found a suitable deal with the San Diego Padres.

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Eric Hosmer finally found a suitable deal with the San Diego Padres.
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Patrick Smith/Getty

Both Martinez and Hosmer settled for contracts that were large, but well below their market value. Few teams contacted them to inquire about their star services. Even lower-tiered players like Carlos Gonzalez and Jarrod Dyson had to accept low salaries.

Several explanations are simultaneously affecting players’ earning potentials. The Cubs and Houston Astros won the last two World Series due in part to what many viewed as a concerted effort to tank the previous seasons. Teams sacrificing seasons for the hopes of getting better later is a growing trend in baseball and is a sensitive subject in basketball and football as well.

Teams have also learned that they gain more leverage in negotiations by waiting it out. If there is a particular player a team feels they cannot lose out on, the front office will jump the gun and sign him as soon as they can. But the majority of the time, players are imperfect and alternative options exist that don’t lend to urgency.

Another source of frustration for free agents is the rise of young players. Since players need six years of experience before becoming free agents, youthful talent that is under team control is seen as a better value, especially considering the increased production of this group.

Whatever the reason, baseball owners were not paying out and free agent players took the brunt of the blow.

Jordan Spieth says his shot has one flaw — but it also means his career is less likely to go off the rails like Tiger Woods

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Josh Hedges/Getty Images

  • Jordan Spieth is one of the best golfers in the world despite not hitting the ball as far as the other top players.
  • The lack of distance can be a flaw in today’s game where the longer hitters tend to have an advantage.
  • Spieth wishes he could hit the ball farther, but also believes he is less likely to get hurt, which should lead to a long and successful career.

Jordan Spieth’s career is off to an incredible start, with three major championships and more than $45 million in career earnings on the course alone.

And he is still just 24 years old.

But that hasn’t stopped some from pointing out that Spieth’s game still has one major flaw and speculating that it will eventually come back to haunt him.

After Spieth won his first two majors, Golf Digest called Spieth’s success a case of “sleight of hand,” noting that he doesn’t follow golf’s “tried-and-true formula for being a dominant player.” That is, Spieth does not hit the ball very far.

Spieth has spoken openly about wishing he hit the ball as far as other big hitters, like Rory McIlroy, who averaged 317.2 yards per drive in 2017. That was 21.6 yards farther than Spieth (295.6), who ranked 75th on the Tour last year.

“I wish I could hit as far as he does,” Spieth said. “It’s something I’ve been working on and have gotten longer over the last few years. I definitely envy his power.”

The old golf saying, “drive for show, putt for dough,” is a bit outdated as the modern game tends to favor longer hitters. But Spieth has proven to be the exception.

Not only has Spieth been successful without driving the ball a country mile, but the perceived “flaw” may be a huge advantage later in his career.

When Spieth was asked on “The Dan Patrick Show” about the sustainability of his game, Spieth said his swing will be a benefit over the long haul.

“My swing, I believe, while not technically perfect, I know it, and it’s not going to get me hurt,” Spieth told Patrick. “There is nothing in it that is going to cause injury … As long you are not doing anything to harm your body, and you don’t do anything dumb off the course, I don’t see why my career couldn’t last quite a while.”

This has been the biggest flaw of Tiger Woods’ career – that he hasn’t been able to stay healthy. And many have pointed to his big swing that has always put an incredible amount of torque on his back and his legs.

Woods has also famously changed his swing several times, which means he and his body have consistently needed to relearn the swing, whereas Spieth has (so far) shown a desire to remain loyal to just one swing, a swing his body knows well.

Spieth may never hit it as far as Woods or the others, but he feels that his swing will help him avoid a similar career downfall.

‘Uber-for-helicopters’ startup Blade just raised $38 million — here’s what it’s like to fly to the Hamptons

A Blade helicopter lands at East Hampton Airport.

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A Blade helicopter lands at East Hampton Airport.
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Madeline Stone / Business Insider

  • Blade is a transportation startup that offers on-demand flights to destinations like the Hamptons.
  • It just raised an additional $38 million in venture funding.
  • We took a helicopter ride with Blade in 2015 – here’s what it was like.

Getting to the Hamptons can be a real drag. Blade, an aviation startup cofounded by former Sony and Warner Music Group exec Rob Wiesenthal and GroupMe cofounder Steve Martocci, aims to make it a little easier on you.

Blade uses an app to crowdsource flights on helicopters and seaplanes that you can book seats on in an instant. Though Blade started out with flights to the Hamptons, which remains one of its most popular destinations, the startup has expanded to offer flights in many weekend getaway spots, including Nantucket, the Jersey Shore, and around different parts of Los Angeles.

Tickets range from $494 to $695 for a trip from Manhattan to the Hamptons. A one-way ticket on Blade One, the company’s private jet service from New York to Miami and Palm Beach, costs about $2,200. You can even snag a seat on a helicopter going to one of the New York area airports, a five-minute ride called Blade Bounce that starts at $195.

The company just raised $38 million in a Series B funding round led by Colony NorthStar and Lerer Hippeau. Airbus Helicopters and LionTree Ventures also contributed to the round.

According to a press release from the company, the new funding will go towards expanding Blade’s routes. Blade and Airbus will partner to launch an intra-city helicopter service in a to-be-determined market overseas. Blade added that Colony will be helping to identify future potential landing sites for eVTOLs, or flying taxis, which both companies see as an important foundation for future transportation initiatives.

Blade has raised $60 million in venture funding to date, the company said. Past investors include Discovery Communications’ David Zaslav, Google’s Eric Schmidt, IAC’s Barry Diller, and iHeart Media’s Bob Pittman.

Blade treated us to a trip to the Hamptons on a late summer evening in 2015. Here’s what it was like:


Our journey began in Blade’s 34th Street lounge, where we found a comfortable setup of couches and stools along a sleek bar. “You can’t beat the on-demand aspect,” Jarrett, a Blade customer who works in Manhattan real estate, told me. Blade has a network of seven lounges in four states.

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Madeline Stone / Business Insider

Customer experience (or C/X in Blade lingo) representatives Jessica Rooney and Erin Mulcahy were there to help. They’re wearing uniforms that were custom designed by Jimmy Choo founder Tamara Mellon just for Blade.

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Madeline Stone / Business Insider

The C/X team has worn several different retro-inspired uniforms. “My inspiration for Blade harkens back to the days when I was a young child and my parents would dress me up to get on a plane,” Wiesenthal, Blade’s cofounder and CEO, said to Business Insider in 2016.

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Blade

He added: “It was the golden age of aviation – the ’60s to early ’70’s, the Jack Kennedy, Frank Sinatra era – when getting on a jet plane was a big deal and an adventure. Not everybody did it. And there was always a story attached to it.”


Once you check in, you’ll get a wristband that corresponds to your flight.

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Madeline Stone / Business Insider

You’ll also get a luggage tag to match the wristband. As you might expect, the bags on the rack in the Blade lounge were a little more high-end than what you might find at your standard transit depot.

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Madeline Stone / Business Insider

After you’re all checked in, guests are encouraged to mosey on over to the bar for a drink.

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Madeline Stone / Business Insider

The Blade drink of choice is a rosé. So that you don’t have to worry about spilling during your flight, Blade serves the rosé in a specialty sippy cup. “When we first launched Blade, we weren’t sure about the availability of helicopters from our operators,” Wiesenthal said. “To protect ourselves from delays, and to keep down the nerves of our customers, we started serving rosé.”

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Madeline Stone / Business Insider

Many of the lounge’s decorations are reminiscent of the ’60s and ’70s.

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Madeline Stone / Business Insider

Wiesenthal’s entertainment background obviously played a big role in his founding of Blade. “We’re trying to make an emotional connection to the consumer,” he said. Here he is with Alena Martanovicova (left) and Rooney (right), members of the C/X team.

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Madeline Stone / Business Insider

Click here to read more about Rob Wiesenthal »


As we relaxed in the lounge, we could see passengers boarding helicopters just outside the window. The reason Blade is able to offer so many on-demand flights is that the platform supports routes from different operators. One of those operators is Liberty Helicopter, which you can see here. Blade itself does not own any helicopters.

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Madeline Stone / Business Insider

In addition to its helicopters, Blade has added several seaplanes to its contracted fleet.

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Madeline Stone / Business Insider

This small card with my name on it guaranteed me a spot on the 4:30 flight to East Hampton.

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Madeline Stone / Business Insider

As we prepared for takeoff, the choppy waters of the East River rocked the seaplane back and forth.

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Madeline Stone / Business Insider

But once we were airborne, we were treated to this incredible view.

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Madeline Stone / Business Insider

It only took us about 35 minutes to get to East Hampton on the seaplane, and we had incredible views the whole way. The flight can take as little as 27 minutes on Blade’s Sikorski helicopters.

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Madeline Stone / Business Insider

But once we were seeing estates with their own swimming pools and tennis courts, we knew we were getting close.

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Madeline Stone / Business Insider

As we waited at the East Hampton Airport, more and more Blade-branded flights continued to touch down on the tarmac. Since I took my flight, Blade has added services to a whole slew of destinations, including Nantucket, the Jersey Shore, Los Angeles, Newport, Atlantic City, and Litchfield County, Connecticut.

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Madeline Stone / Business Insider

The company has also in the past entered partnerships for special events like Coachella.

A partnership with Delta allows passengers flying between JFK and LAX on that airline to deplane directly from the jetway to the tarmac, where a Blade helicopter awaits.


As we made our way back to the city by chopper, I wondered what it would be like to do this every weekend.

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Madeline Stone / Business Insider

I’m far from owning a house in the Hamptons, but I could see why someone with much more disposable income would prefer this glamorous experience to hours sitting in traffic on the Long Island Expressway.

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Madeline Stone / Business Insider

Mark Zuckerberg just turned 34 years old. Here are 33 photos of Facebook’s rise from a Harvard dorm room to world domination.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg.

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg.
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Robert Galbraith/Reuters

Facebook is a classic Silicon Valley success story: It’s gone from an idea hatched in a Harvard dorm to one of the most powerful and influential companies in the world.

Mark Zuckerberg, its CEO and founder, celebrated his 34th birthday on Monday – and, as CNBC calculates, he has made an average of $6 million for every day he’s been alive so far.

Indeed, these days, Facebook is worth around $536 billion, and more than 2.2 billion people use its social network monthly.

Here’s the story behind Facebook’s insane rise from February 2004 through today.

Spoiler alert: It involves a lot of beer.


Facebook got its start at Harvard’s Kirkland House dormitory.

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Wikimedia Commons

That’s the same dorm where Wallace Shawn, who played Vizzini in “The Princess Bride” and the voice of Rex in “Toy Story,” lived during his Harvard years.


In 2003, Mark Zuckerberg, then a sophomore at Harvard, built a website called Facemash.

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Facebook/Mark Zuckerberg

“Facemash” was a Hot or Not-style site. Zuckerberg used pictures of his classmates that he hacked from the school administration’s dormitory ID files. The site got 22,000 pageviews from 450 people in the first four hours it was up.

A few days later, Harvard ordered it to be taken down, citing copyright and security concerns. Zuckerberg faced disciplinary action from Harvard but was allowed to stay at the school.


Undeterred by the Facemash debacle, Zuckerberg launched “Thefacebook” on February 4, 2004.

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Wikipedia

Six days after the launch, three Harvard seniors claimed Zuckerberg reneged on an agreement to build a site for them and used their ideas to create what eventually became Facebook.

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The Winklevoss twins.
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REUTERS/Stephen Lam

Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss and Divya Narendra claimed Zuckerberg had agreed to build a website called HarvardConnection.com for them before abandoning them to create his own site. They eventually filed a lawsuit that was settled in 2008.

As part of that settlement, they received 1.2 million Facebook shares. Those shares were worth $300 million when Facebook had its IPO.


Within a month, half of Harvard’s students were members of Thefacebook.

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Dustin Moskovitz with Zuckerberg.
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<a href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/valleywagprime/2360339689/”>valleywagprime</a> via Flickr

By March 2004, Thefacebook had expanded to Yale, Columbia, and Stanford. Zuckerberg brought in fellow Harvard students Dustin Moskovitz, Eduardo Saverin, Andrew McCollum, and Chris Hughes as cofounders to help manage the site’s growth and build it into a business.


Just a few months after the site’s launch, Facebook’s team put together the site’s first ad-sales pitch.

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Facebook

The slide deck showed the site’s amazing early growth – and its limited number of features.


At this point, Zuckerberg was still running Facebook out of his dorm room, but it was time to get serious.

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Mark Zuckerberg

In 2004, Zuckerberg dropped out of Harvard, much like Microsoft cofounder Bill Gates before him.


In mid-2004, Zuckerberg hired Napster cofounder Sean Parker to be Facebook’s first president.

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Andrew Mager / Wikimedia Commons

In June 2004, Facebook set up shop in a tiny office in downtown Palo Alto, California.

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YouTube

Back then, the company was known for being as much a party hub as it was a serious startup.

This photo was taken from “Now Entering: a Millennial Generation,” a 2008 documentary.


That office, right in downtown Palo Alto, was incredibly unassuming.

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Google Street View

See that glass door, No. 471? That led to a set of stairs that would take you up to Facebook’s space.

Years later, I briefly worked for a company that would use the same office space. There’s a good sushi place around the corner.


Zuckerberg would often hang out in the office in shorts, barefoot, and with a beer in hand.


No, seriously, they loved beer.

In this photo, one of the documentary crew members pours a beer from Facebook’s keg while Andrew McCollum hangs out with a lady friend.


That office was also well known for having risqué graffiti art on its walls.


The same month it moved into its Palo Alto office, Facebook got its first outside funding.

The $500,000 investment came from PayPal cofounders Peter Thiel (left) and Elon Musk. Thiel has since become a prominent venture capitalist, while Musk, of course, went on to found Tesla and SpaceX.


By this point, Facebook was starting its rapid ascent toward cultural superstardom.

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The early Facebook team pushes the button to launch the News Feed into the site.
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Mark Zuckerberg

In May 2005, Facebook raised $13.7 million in funding. In 2006, Facebook created its News Feed. The feature, which gave people a real-time stream of what their friends were doing, was a breakthrough and became a core feature of the site.


In late 2007, Zuckerberg met a Google executive named Sheryl Sandberg at a Christmas party.

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Sandberg (left) and Zuckerberg
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“Charlie Rose”/PBS

At the time, Sandberg was considering taking a new position with The Washington Post. But after meeting her, Zuckerberg decided Facebook needed a chief operating officer, and managed to persuade her to come aboard in early 2008.

It was a prescient hire. Facebook was already growing quickly, but the rise of the smartphone brought with it a lot more users.


In 2009, Facebook moved into a slightly larger Palo Alto office in the Stanford Research Park.

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Wikimedia Commons

The move came as Facebook’s site was experiencing explosive growth. By late 2010, it hit a trillion page views a month.


That space wouldn’t hold Facebook for long. In 2011, the social network moved again.

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Owen Thomas, Business Insider

This time it set up shop in a corporate campus once occupied by Sun Microsystems, which had fallen from grace and been acquired by Oracle.


Facebook named the campus’ main thoroughfare “Hacker Way.”

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<a href=”http://techcrunch.com/2011/12/05/1-hacker-way/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Techcrunch+%28TechCrunch%29″> via TechCrunch </a>

The name was a reference to Zuckerberg’s famous philosophy of the same name: “Move Fast and Break Things.”


By this point, Facebook was showing that its social network could play a major role in global politics.

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The 2011 Egyptian protests.
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Wikimedia Commons

The site’s influence was highlighted by the Egyptian uprising in February 2011. That uprising was largely organized via Facebook and other social-networking sites.


Zuckerberg himself was also getting more involved in the political scene.

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President Barack Obama, left, with Zuckerberg.
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Facebook

Among his first public political actions was to speak to world leaders in support of spreading internet access all over the globe.


Facebook has also long been a proponent of marriage equality and equal rights.

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Facebook Rainbow Pride HQ sign.
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Nicole Bort

The social network was becoming unstoppable. Facebook had its historic $5 billion initial public offering on May 18, 2012.


That same year Facebook started giving employees its “Little Red Book.”

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Ben Barry

The book, which has since become legendary, consists of propaganda-like slogans. Facebook gave it to employees to make sure, even as the company grew rapidly, they would stay on the same page.


The day after the IPO, Zuckerberg somehow found the time to get married.

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Priscilla Chan (left) and Zuckerberg.
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Facebook.com/zuck

Zuckerberg married his longtime girlfriend, Priscilla Chan, whom he met while still at Harvard.


Over the years, the company has snapped up a bunch of hot startups, including photo-sharing hit Instagram.

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Instagram cofounder Kevin Systrom (left) with Zuckerberg.
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Facebook

Facebook bought Instagram for $1 billion in 2012. The photo-sharing app now has more than 400 million users.

The purchase was a demonstration of how, despite its rise, Facebook has always been on the lookout for the next startup that threatened to disrupt it.


It also bought virtual-reality headset maker Oculus.

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Zuckerberg (right) tests out Oculus’ Rift headset and motion sensing Touch controllers.
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Facebook

Oculus was an early-stage startup when Facebook acquired it in March 2014 for $2 billion.


And it purchased mobile-messaging company WhatsApp — for $19 billion.

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WhatsApp cofounder Jan Koum.
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David Ramos / Getty Images

Facebook made the acquisition in February 2014. WhatsApp’s cofounder, Jan Koum, joined Facebook board after the deal, and the service now has more than 1 billion daily active users.


By the time Facebook turned 10 in 2014, over 1.23 billion people were visiting the social network every month.

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Screenshot/Entrepreneurship Corner

A billion of those users were accessing the social network through their mobile devices.

The world had changed, but Facebook had kept on growing.


To support all that growth, Facebook had to move to a bigger office — again.

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Facebook

In March 2015, Facebook opened a new campus in Menlo Park, California. The campus was designed by legendary architect Frank Gehry to accommodate more than 2,800 employees.


Whatever happens next, the company remains driven by Zuckerberg’s mission to connect everybody in the world.

As Zuckerberg put it in a letter to investors in Facebook’s IPO filing, “Simply put: We don’t build services to make money; we make money to build better services.”


In December 2015, Zuckerberg announced he was getting into philanthropy in a big way.

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Adam Berry/Getty Images

He and his wife formed the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, a limited-liability corporation to which he plans to contribute 99% of his wealth and reinvest it in world-changing causes.


Even with his contributions to the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, Zuckerberg is keeping his iron grip on Facebook.

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Screenshot via MSQRD

The way he has structured Facebook’s stock gives him disproportionate voting power that keeps him in charge, no matter what else happens to the company. So he’s not losing control of the company any time soon.


Facebook had a rocky 2017, and a rockier 2018, culminating in Zuckerberg testifying in front of the United States Congress.

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Reuters

In the wake of the 2016 presidential election, Facebook spent much of 2017 under scrutiny for its role in the spread of “fake news” and misinformation.

When it came out that firm called Cambridge Analytica had improperly obtained the personal data of as many as 87 million Facebook users, Zuckerberg was ultimately called to the floor of the US Congress to answer tough questions about the social network’s business.


Now, Zuckerberg — and Facebook — are under more pressure than ever, as the world comes to a greater recognition of the role the social network has come to play in our daily lives.

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

As Zuckerberg himself noted several times during his congressional testimony: Facebook may be big now, but it came from the humble origins of his Harvard dorm room.

22 signs your coworkers secretly hate you

When your coworkers like you, everything becomes easier.

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When your coworkers like you, everything becomes easier.
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Rawpixel.com/Shutterstock

  • Odds are, you’re not going to get along perfectly with every single one of your coworkers.
  • But sometimes, you’ll run into a colleague who just seems to have it out for you.
  • Signs your coworkers secretly hate you include never maintaining eye contact with you and always excluding you from office banter.

Haters are going to hate, right?

In our personal lives, it’s easier to dismiss people who don’t like us. But at work, being widely disliked can pose a larger problem.

Lynn Taylor, a national workplace expert and the author of “Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant: How to Manage Childish Boss Behavior and Thrive in Your Job,” said:

“Most coworkers won’t overtly show their disdain for you so as not to cause trouble or jeopardize their own careers. They may make life difficult for you, but they’ll probably try to stay under the radar. Still, there are subtle red flags that they’re not out for your best interests.”

You’ll want to know those signs, says Taylor, so you can spot them when they’re present and turn things around before it’s too late.

“Of course, it’s impossible to be liked by everyone in the office,” she said.

But you should always strive to be sensitive to the needs of your fellow coworkers, remain upbeat and friendly, communicate openly, and give colleagues the benefit of the doubt.

“Those who do this have a far brighter career future,” she said. “Plus, when [we] have strong, healthy workplace relationships, you will be more effective and accomplished in your job.”

Michael Kerr, an international business speaker and author of “The Humor Advantage,” agreed.

“When your coworkers like you, everything becomes easier,” he said. “People have your back when you need it the most, you can ask for and get favors more easily, people will volunteer to help in times of need, and you can get far better cooperation even across departments.”

Being well-liked will boost your morale, which in turn will make you more productive, focused, creative, and successful in everything you do, he said.

Here are 22 subtle signs that your coworkers secretly hate you. But keep in mind that you may just be misreading their body language or tone – the workplace is certainly not immune to human misunderstanding and no one’s a mind reader.


Your gut tells you they don’t like you

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aslysun/Shutterstock

If you feel like your coworkers don’t like you, then it could just be in your head, but it could also be true. If they treat you differently than everyone else, then you’re probably not their favorite person. Trust your gut and continue looking for other signs if you have a strong feeling about this.


They don’t smile when you’re around

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Andrew Balcombe/Shutterstock

We’re not talking about the occasional bad day or mood swing. If your coworkers make a conscious effort not to smile when you’re in the room, then something isn’t right.


They can’t maintain eye contact with you

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Domaskina/Shutterstock

It’s difficult to look someone straight in the eye when you don’t like or respect them, says Taylor. If you notice that your colleagues avoid eye contact while speaking with you, then those are probably the reasons.

“They’re afraid that you may be able to detect hostility, so the path of least resistance is for them to look away or avoid being around you wherever possible,” Taylor said.


They constantly stare at you

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Shutterstock/Blend Images

Alternatively, a prolonged, intense stare can also be a sign of rudeness, aggression, or hostility, CNN reported.

Whether or not someone avoids your gaze or gives you a hostile glare depends on their personality and whether or not they’re comfortable with coming across as aggressive.

Then again, it’s possible that the starer is just awkward or zoning out.


They avoid you

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Emilio Labrador/flickr

Writing for the Muse, Kat Boogard gave a striking example of the lengths someone might go to in order to escape the presence of a disliked coworker: “When it’s just the two of you waiting for an elevator, he decides to walk down the stairs – all 14 flights.”

If you notice that your coworkers take the stairs when they see you waiting for the elevator, or they wait until you return from the break room before they head in, then those are good signs that they’re avoiding you.


They don’t acknowledge your presence

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BarakBlueSky/Shutterstock

If your colleagues don’t say “Good morning” when you arrive or “Have a great night” on their way out, they may be telling you they don’t like you, said Taylor.


They feed the rumor mill

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Jacob Lund/Shutterstock

This is childish and unprofessional behavior, but it happens in workplaces all the time: Someone doesn’t like you, so they spread rumors.


They’re short with you

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MR. Nattanon Kanchak/Shutterstock

If you ask “How’s it going?” and they always respond with “OK” or “Fine” – or if their emails always get straight to the point and never begin with a friendly “Hello” or “Good afternoon” – then this may be a sign that they’re not a huge fan of yours.

“If they sound like a moody teenager, then that’s a pretty big red flag,” said Kerr.


They give off negative body language

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Alberto Zornetta/Shutterstock

Whether it’s a subtle eye roll or constantly assuming a closed-off position with arms folded across their chest, or they don’t look up from their computer screen when you enter their office, your coworkers’ body language will often reveal their true feelings toward you, Kerr said.


They communicate with you primarily via email, even though you sit close by

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Sebastiaan ter Burg/Flickr

If your coworkers don’t like you, they’ll probably try to limit their in-person communication with you. If you notice a shift toward more digital correspondence, that’s a sign.


They never ask about your personal life

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Dean Drobot / Shutterstock

If you notice that your colleagues speak with each other about their kids or hobbies, but never bring up these topics with you, they’re probably just not interested in hearing about your life, says Kerr.


They never invite you to social events

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Goran Bogicevic/Shutterstock

If you never make the cut for lunch, happy hour, or project meetings over coffee, your coworkers may be trying to send you a message.


They constantly disagree with you

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Motortion Films/Shutterstock

Continuously gunning down your ideas is a sign they don’t like you.

“If it feels like someone shoots down every thought before you’ve even finished a sentence, then it’s often because their dislike is so strong that they are biased against anything you suggest, even when it’s a great idea,” said Kerr.


They don’t ever include you in their office bantering or humor

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Strelka/Flickr

“Joking around is a key way that relationships become cemented in any workplace, and not inviting you into the inner circle of bantering is a sign your coworkers may not feel comfortable around you enough to think of you as one of ‘the team,'” said Kerr.


They steal credit for your ideas

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U.S. Department of Agriculture/Flickr

These coworkers could just be “glory hogs,” said Taylor.

But if they go out of their way to steal the limelight from you and only you, they may be trying to drive you out.


They assume unauthorized power

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WAYHOME studio/Shutterstock

Sometimes coworkers who want to muscle in on your position will play boss even when they have no authority, said Taylor.


They create cliques that are reminiscent of high school

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Paramount Pictures/Youtube

If you feel like you’re in a scene from the movie “Mean Girls,” and you’re not invited to hang out or sit with any of the office cliques, your colleagues probably don’t like you very much.


There’s a fundamental lack of trust

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Pabak Sarkar/flickr

If you’re questioned excessively about your motives or your coworkers only dole out information on a need-to-know basis, they may be trying to sabotage your career, said Taylor.


They try to encourage you to leave the company

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If throwing you under the bus doesn’t do the trick, then your coworkers may try other tactics for getting rid of you.

If they start sending you job postings at other companies, offer to put you in touch with contacts elsewhere, or tell you that they think you’d be “happier” or “more successful” in another environment – when you’re perfectly happy and thriving where you are – then it’s probably not because they’re concerned about your well-being.

Chances are, they just don’t like you and want you gone.


They throw you under the bus

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Do your coworkers throw you under the bus when something goes wrong? Do they tattle on you for saying or doing something against company policy? Do they run to tell your boss any time you make a mistake?

Then they’re probably trying to get you fired.


They never make you or your work a priority

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Another big sign your coworkers despise you: They never make your concerns or problems a priority, and they don’t treat your work with the same level of urgency that they do your colleagues’, Kerr said.


They get defensive around you

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“If they often and immediately get defensive around you, it could indicate that there’s a lack of trust, and possibly deeper dislike,” said Kerr.

Jacquelyn Smith contributed to a previous version of this post.

Have you ever had to deal with a toxic workplace? Email acain@businessinsider.com.