Monthly Archives: December 2016

How to use Do Not Disturb, the best way to set limits on your iPhone’s notifications

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Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

One common New Year’s resolution in the age of smartphones is to disconnect more and live in the present.

If you’re trying to set better limits on how you use technology in 2017, and you’re an iPhone user, you should use a feature called Do Not Disturb.

Although it won’t shock you if you mindlessly scroll on Instagram for hours, it will help you control the notifications that sometimes lead to mindless email, social networks, and texting.

Although Do Not Disturb is built into every single iPhone, and has been for years, it can be a little bit confusing to get started. But when you do, you’ll find it’s perhaps the most powerful tool Apple provides for controlling when you receive those distracting, attention-grabbing notifications (except for perhaps turning your phone off entirely).

When I first used Do Not Disturb earlier this year, I wondered why I hadn’t started using it sooner. Here’s what you need to know:


Do Not Disturb is an alternative way to mute your device. But unlike the hardware side switch on the left-hand side, it also stops the phone from lighting up with notifications entirely.

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Business Insider

There are two primary ways to turn Do Not Disturb on. First, on a daily schedule — say, from 10 p.m. to 7 a.m.

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Apple

You can also activate Do Not Disturb manually by pressing the “crescent moon” button on the Control Center. This is how I usually turn it on.

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BI/Screenshot

If Do Not Disturb is turned on, there will be a crescent icon in the top icon bar of your iPhone.

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BI/Screenshot

You can fine-tune Do Not Disturb in Settings > Do Not Disturb. Let’s go through a few key settings.

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BI/Screenshot

If you want to make sure your loved ones can still call and text you when Do Not Disturb is on, you can allow calls from everyone, nobody, your contacts, or favorites, which is the speed dial menu in your phone app.

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BI/Screenshot

You cannot whitelist texts, unfortunately. You will still receive texts but you will not get notifications if Do Not Disturb is turned on.


You can also set it so that anyone repeatedly trying to call you can get through.

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Apple

This is the most important setting for me. I prefer silence even with the iPhone is being used, so that I’m not getting email notifications if I’m, say, playing a game after work hours. Pick “Always” to turn sounds and notifications off even if you’re using the phone.

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BI/Screenshot

A giant wave of store closures is about to hit the US

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Rolling Acres Mall in Akron, Ohio.
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Nicholas Eckhart

Retailers are bracing for a fresh wave of store closures at the start of the new year.

The industry is heading into 2017 with a glut of store space as shopping continues to shift online and foot traffic to malls declines, according to analysts.

“If you are weaker player, it’s going to be a very tough 2017 for you,” said RJ Hottovy, a consumer equity strategist for Morningstar.

He said he’s expecting a number of retailers to file for bankruptcy next year, in addition to mass store closures.

Nearly every major department store, including Macy’s, Kohl’s, Walmart, and Sears, have collectively closed hundreds of stores over the last couple years to try and stem losses from unprofitable stores and the rise of ecommerce.

But the closures are far from over.

Macy’s has already said that it’s planning to close 100 stores, or about 15% of its fleet, in 2017. Sears is shuttering at least 30 Sears and Kmart stores by April, and additional closures are expected to be announced soon. CVS also said this month that it’s planning to shut down 70 locations.

Mall stores like Aeropostale, which filed for bankruptcy in May, American Eagle, Chicos, Finish Line, Men’s Wearhouse, and The Children’s Place are also in the midst of multi-year plans to close stores.

Many more announcements like these are expected in the coming months.

The start of the year is a popular time to announce store closures. Nearly half of annual store closings announced since 2010 have occurred in the first quarter, CNBC reports.

In addition to closing stores, retailers are also looking to shrink their existing locations.

“As leases come up, you’re going to see a gradual rotation into smaller-footprint stores,” Hottovy said.

Despite recent closures, the US is still oversaturated with stores.

The US has 23.5 square feet of retail space per person, compared with 16.4 square feet in Canada and 11.1 square feet in Australia – the next two countries with the highest retail space per capita, according to a Morningstar report from October.

“Across retail overall the US has too much space and too many shops,” said Neil Saunders, CEO of the retail consulting firm Conlumino. “As shopping patterns have changed, some of those shops are also in the wrong place and are of the wrong size or configuration.”

As stores continue to close, many shopping malls will be forced to shut down as well.

When an anchor store like Sears or Macy’s closes, it often triggers a “downward spiral in performance” for shopping malls, Morningstar analysts wrote in the report from October.

The malls don’t only lose the income and shopper traffic from that store’s business. The closure often triggers “co-tenancy clauses” that allow the remaining mall tenants to exercise their right to terminate their leases or renegotiate the terms, typically with a period of lower rents, until another retailer moves into the vacant anchor space.

To reduce losses, malls must quicklyfind a replacement tenant for the massive retail space that the anchor store occupied, which is nearly impossible – especially in malls that are already financially strapped – when every major department store is reducing its retail footprint.

That can have “grave” consequences for shopping malls, especially in markets where it’s harder to transform vacant mall space into non-retail space like apartments, according to the analysts.

The Morningstar report supports another recent analysis from Credit Suisse that said about 200 shopping malls are at risk of shutting down if Sears continues to close stores.

What to expect from Apple in 2017

2016 was a bit of an off year for Apple.

iPhone sales were down for the first time in the product’s history.

The iPhone 7 turned out to be a great phone, but Apple upset a lot of people by removing the headphone jack.

The AirPods were delayed two months, meaning most people couldn’t get them in time for the holidays. (You’ll have to wait until February 2017 for them to arrive if you order them now.)

And Consumer Reports torched the new MacBook Pro for its inconsistent battery life.

So what does 2017 look like for Apple? Here’s what I predict will dominate the conversation around Apple’s products next year. It’s not an all-inclusive list, but it’s the stuff you’ll likely care the most about.

New iPads

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AP

It feels like an eternity since Apple had anything to say about the iPad. We got the new 9.7-inch iPad Pro this past spring, but every other iPad model is one to three years old at this point.

The lineup is well overdue for a refresh, and it sounds like that may be coming soon.

Rumors are all over the place, but it sounds like Apple is planning to release some new iPad models in the spring of 2017. Some reports say the new iPads will have slightly larger screens (10 inches, up from 9.7 inches), and that the non-Pro models will work with the Apple Pencil.

Unfortunately, the early reports about the new crop of iPads are so consistent that it’s tough to lock down exactly what Apple will end up launching. But it is pretty clear Apple’s 2017 will start with the iPad.

A greater emphasis on Siri

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Apple/YouTube

Two of Apple’s biggest rivals doubled down on voice assistants this year, leaving Siri in the dust.

Google launched its excellent new Assistant on the Pixel phone and Google Home speaker. Assistant can tap into Google’s vast library of internet knowledge to bring you the answers you want.

Amazon continued to define the voice assistant category by expanding Alexa to new Echo devices like the Dot and Amazon Tap. Plus, third parties started integrating Alexa into their gadgets. (Expect to see so much more of that in 2017, by the way.)

Despite its five-year head start on the competition, Siri still feels woefully behind. Apple added limited third-party support for Siri, but there are few signs it’s really taking off.

What could we see from Siri in 2017?

The good news for Apple is it’s sitting on a lot of excellent AI and voice control technology, especially thanks to its purchase of a UK-based startup called VocalIQ. I wrote about VocalIQ way back in May. The technology would allow users to control all their Apple gadgets with just their voice, which will be useful in the home, car, and while using the AirPods.

Here’s what I reported at the time:

Because VocalIQ understands context so well, it essentially eliminates the need to look at a screen for confirmation that it’s doing what you want it to do. That’s useful on the phone, but could be even better for other ambitious projects like the car or smart-speaker system Apple is reportedly building. (VocalIQ was being pitched as a voice-controlled AI platform for cars before Apple bought the company.)

In fact, VocalIQ only considers itself a success when the user is able to complete a task without looking at a screen. Siri, Google Now, and Cortana often ask you to confirm tasks by tapping on the screen.

2017 would be a great time for Apple to start incorporating VocalIQ’s technology into Siri, considering how far ahead the competition is today.

Another dull year for the Mac

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Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

The only thing of note to happen with the Mac this year was the launch of the new MacBook Pro. And even that was met with a lot of anger. Many were upset that they had to purchase a lot of adapters to get their accessories to work with the new Thunderbolt 3 port. And then everyone learned the MacBook Pro’s battery life was nowhere near as good as Apple claimed.

Bummer.

It doesn’t look like much more is in store for the Mac in 2017. The iMac could get a spec bump and the battery life on the MacBook Pro could (and should!) get fixed, but don’t expect much else.

Modest improvements to the Apple Watch

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Hollis Johnson

Apple learned a major lesson with the Apple Watch, and has since scaled back expectations for the device and focused on health and fitness instead with the new Apple Watch Series 2. It’s unlikely the Apple Watch will get a significant update in 2017, but I wouldn’t be surprised if a new model showed up with 4G connectivity so you could use it without your iPhone.

A major iPhone refresh

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A salesman checks a customer’s iPhone at a mobile phone store in New Delhi, India, July 27, 2016.
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REUTERS/Adnan Abidi

2017 will mark the iPhone’s tenth anniversary, and it sounds like Apple is gearing up for a blowout.

The next iPhone is said to be a major refresh with an all-glass design, no bezels around the screen, and possibly a version with a curved display. Not to mention wireless charging, the death of the home button, and a new screen technology called OLED, which provides deeper, richer colors. By now there are so many reputable reports backing up these claims that it’s silly not to believe them.

The iPhone is Apple’s most important and profitable product. If it feels like the company has shifted focus from other categories to focus on the iPhone, it’s easy to see why. It’s the product you’re going to care the most about and spend the most money on. Expect to start seeing the first design leaks early in 2017.

Rebound?

After a year full of various stumbles, Apple is exiting 2016 on shakier ground than it started. Besides the next iPhone, there doesn’t seem to be too much coming in the pipeline to get super excited about. The big challenge for Apple in 2017 will be to unlock more potential from its products by continuing to improve where it’s always been the weakest: AI, software, and other digital services.

A 15-year study finds indoor smoking bans really do make kids with asthma healthier

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Marcelo del Pozo/Reuters

Prohibiting people from smoking indoors does more than just keep bars from smelling like cigarettes, new research suggests. It’s actually doing kids a favor.

A new long-term study finds that on average, kids with asthma visited the emergency room 17% less often during the three years after indoor smoking bans were enacted than they did in the three years before.

The data overwhelmingly shows that kids really do get healthier when their lungs aren’t exposed to secondhand smoke, the researchers say.

“This study shows that even those short exposures to secondhand smoke in public spaces like restaurants can have a significant impact on asthma exacerbations,” University of Chicago immunologist Dr. Christina Ciaccio said in a statement.

Anyone born before the early 1990s likely remembers an era when smoking wasn’t relegated to the outdoors. For decades (centuries, perhaps) people lit up at work, in restaurants, and even in hospital rooms. Little attention was paid to the direct health consequences, let alone the secondhand effects.

The new study quantifies those impacts, however. Ciaccio and two colleagues – one from Brown University and the other from the University of Kansas – gathered data on asthmatic kids’ emergency room visits between 2000 and 2014.

In total, the team logged 335,558 visits across 20 hospitals in 14 states. To single out the effects of the smoking bans, they controlled for a variety of factors: age, gender, race, and Medicare enrollment as a stand-in for socioeconomic status.

Rates varied depending on the specific area, but the overall trend clearly showed kids making fewer ER visits as time went on. After one year, the average decline was 8%. After two years, it was 13%. And after three, it was 17%.

While the researchers can’t prove that the bans single-handedly caused the decline in asthma-related ER visits, they suggest that is the most plausible interpretation of the data.

As of October 1, 2016, 26 US states had banned smoking indoors at restaurants, bars, and non-hospitality workplaces (meaning hotels are still fair game). The latest research suggests the remaining 24 states could save young lives by adopting those policies, too.

Milo Yiannopoulos’ publisher responds to outrage over his $250,000 book deal

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Milo Yiannopoulos.
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Milo Yiannopoulos

Simon & Schuster, the publisher of Milo Yiannopoulos’ book, responded Friday to the criticism over his $250,000 book deal.

The deal raised eyebrows due to Yiannopoulos’ pandering to white nationalist supporters on the internet.

The publisher said in a statement on Friday the opinions expressed in books it publishes do not reflect the views of the company.

“We do not and never have condoned discrimination or hate speech in any form,” the statement read, without specifically naming Yiannopoulos or his book, “Dangerous.”

“While we are cognizant that many may disagree vehemently with the books we publish we note that the opinions expressed therein belong to our authors, and do not reflect either a corporate viewpoint or the views of our employees,”Simon & Schuster said.

Yiannopoulos is a known figure in the alt-right movement and was permanently banned from Twitter earlier this year due to accusations of harassment and abuse.

Read Simon & Schuster’s full statement below:

We do not and never have condoned discrimination or hate speech in any form. At Simon & Schuster we have always published books by a wide range of authors with greatly varying, and frequently controversial opinions, and appealing to many different audiences of readers. While we are cognizant that many may disagree vehemently with the books we publish we note that the opinions expressed therein belong to our authors, and do not reflect either a corporate viewpoint or the views of our employees.

Here’s what it’s like to live with a supercar in San Francisco

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2017 Audi R8 V-10 Plus.
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Bryan Logan/Business Insider

Few things are better than the visceral enjoyment of driving a supercar.

Ask any car enthusiast which driver’s seat they prefer, and the answer, almost invariably, will be one that sits low, with a big, thunderous engine out back and a six-figure price tag.

As true as that might be, it’s almost cliché to say that supercars are the stuff of dreams. Certainly they are for most people. For others – including journalists like myself who get to drive these things from time to time – they are less of a dream and more of a study in harsh realities.

Outside of a racetrack or some flawless stretch of pavement underneath impeccable weather, supercars are otherwise useless. Some of them are works of art, to be sure, but once removed from their natural habitats and employed as daily drivers, they are basically loud, over-engineered land missiles that cost more than four times the average annual US household income.

Own one of these cars in a city like San Francisco and you’re in for a stressful experience. And if you’re like most city dwellers who don’t have a personal garage, you can add paranoia and lack of sleep to the mix.

Audi tossed me the keys to a 2017 Audi R8 V-10 Plus a few weeks ago. All things considered, this is one of the few supercars that tries to make itself livable as a daily driver.

There are more than a few areas where the R8 shines. So my experience driving this car in and around San Francisco, though challenging, had less to do with the car itself and more to do with the general headache caused by city living with this much power beneath my feet.

Allow me to explain:


A day with the R8: excitement, joy, visions of how I’ll look behind the wheel. I eyeballed that parking sign more than once and double-checked the curb before I could comfortably walk away.

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Bryan Logan/Business Insider

When your wheels are 20-inch rolling sculptures like these, you try your best not to let a hostile curb destroy them.

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Bryan Logan/Business Insider

Nothing about the R8 is ordinary. These racing seats are firm and supportive. Off the racetrack, they’re better for short city jaunts instead of long drives. Avoid potholes at all costs. These buckets will not forgive you. Neither will the wheels. Nor the suspension.

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Bryan Logan/Business Insider

The interior features Audi’s industry-leading virtual cockpit — a robust digital display in the instrument cluster. That explains the general lack of buttons on the center stack and abundance of buttons on the steering wheel.

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Bryan Logan/Business Insider

OK, enough about parking and seats and steering wheels. Time to drive. You can tell how wary I am of curbs in this car by how wide this left turn is.

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Bryan Logan/Business Insider

A quick look at this engine: It’s a 5.2-liter V-10 that makes 610 horsepower. Driving the R8 in San Francisco means you’ll get to unleash all of that power precisely never.

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Bryan Logan/Business Insider

Here’s how it sounds.


That V-10 has no trouble announcing itself, but here’s some helpful badging in case this beast — painted in dynamite red — distracted you.

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Bryan Logan/Business Insider

San Francisco is famous for its tight, circuitous roads — not easy to navigate in the long, wide R8. Proceed carefully.

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Bryan Logan/Business Insider

The R8’s minimal distance between its front bumper and the ground is a good reason to keep your eyes open for speed bumps and other road obstacles.

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Bryan Logan/Business Insider

Fortunately for San Francisco, this R8, and my nerves, good roads are never too far away. This blacktop near Stinson Beach is one example.

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Bryan Logan/Business Insider

The R8 was firmly in its element here.

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Bryan Logan/Business Insider

The views, despite the lingering fog, were serene.

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Bryan Logan/Business Insider

Many other vehicles were on the road this particular day, but it’s clear whom the overachiever was …

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Bryan Logan/Business Insider

… overachieving in the twisties and in pictures.

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Bryan Logan/Business Insider

All right, time to head south, where it’s a little sunnier …

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Bryan Logan/Business Insider

… to Sweeney Ridge, a local hiking trail a few miles south of San Francisco, where the sun is warm and the wind whips fiercely through the hills.

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Bryan Logan

Driving is not encouraged here.

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Bryan Logan

But perhaps it was at one time.

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Bryan Logan

You can’t hide this car anywhere.

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Bryan Logan/Business Insider

Enough nature — time to get back to the city.

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Bryan Logan/Business Insider

But first, a few errands are in order.

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Bryan Logan/Business Insider

The R8’s mpg numbers don’t look very good on paper (14 city, 22 highway), but it is surprisingly fuel efficient. Its 22-gallon gas tank will get you roughly 300 miles on a full tank of premium.

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Bryan Logan/Business Insider

After navigating the San Francisco Bay Area’s many enclaves, I’m back to the realities of city living — like stocking up for the week ahead. I could only get two bags in the front trunk.

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Bryan Logan/Business Insider

Back home. Thankfully, street parking is generally good in this neighborhood, but space is minimal, and the R8 is nearly 15 feet long. As much as I enjoyed the car, I was happy to return the keys.

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Bryan Logan/Business Insider

All the advertising, media, and marketing figures named in the Queen’s New Year Honours List

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i-D founders Terry and Tricia Jones.
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Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images

The Queen’s New Year Honours list celebrates people in the UK who have made significant contributions to society, whether that be for services to charity, sport, business, and more.

This year’s list includes several well-known figures from across the advertising, marketing, and media industries.

Scroll down to find out who received honours this year:


Cartoonist Peter Brookes

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Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

Brookes is a 73-year-old political cartoonist whose work appears in newspapers and magazines including The Times, New Statesman, and The Spectator.

He received a CBE (Commander of the Order of the British Empire) for services to the media.


Jeremy Sinclair, chairman of M&C Saatchi

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M&C Saatchi LA/Twitter

Sinclair was one of the founders of advertising agency Saatchi & Saatchi and has been working in the industry for more than 50 years. He became founding director of London-based M&C Saatchi in 1995, which now claims to be the biggest independent creative agency network in the world.

M&C Saatchi works with clients including Ikea, Natwest, HBO, Lexus, and Carlsberg.

In 2012 Sinclair published the book “Brutal Simplicity Of Thought.”

He received a CBE for services to advertising.


Kathryn Jacob, CEO of Pearl & Dean

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Advertising Association

Jacob leads Pearl & Dean, the cinema advertising contractor.

She joined the company in 2006 from SMG Access, where she was managing director.

Outside of the day job, Jacob is a former president and member of Women in Advertising and Communications London (WACL),and sits on the board of the Advertising Association.

She was awarded an OBE (Officer for the Order of the British Empire) for services to the promotion of equality and diversity.


Alison Kervin, sports editor at The Mail on Sunday

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Anthony Harvey/Getty Images

In 2013, Kervin became the first female sports editor of a UK national newspaper when she joined the Mail on Sunday.

She was formerly chief sports feature writer for The Times and before that she was a sports interview for The Daily Telegraph.

She also edited the London 2012 Olympics programme, has written a biography about former rugby player Sir Clive Woodward, and co-wrote autobiographies with British Olympian Denise Lewis and former England rugby players Phil Vickery and Jason Leonard.

Kervin was awarded an OBE for services to sports journalism.


Caroline Taylor, vice president for global marketing and communications at IBM

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Twitter

Taylor is based in IBM’s London office and leads the sales and distribution teams responsible for marketing and communications across seven geographical regions.

She is also an executive sponsor for gender diversity for IBM in the UK; a director and trustee of the Oasis Charitable Trust and a chair of the board of trustees of Stop the Traffic.

Taylor joined IBM in 1997, having spent six years in sales and marketing roles in the independent software sector.

She was awarded an OBE for services to marketing, diversity, and the prevention of human trafficking.


Jonathan Agnew, broadcaster

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Gareth Copley/Getty Images

Agnew is a sports broadcaster and has spent 26 seasons as the BBC’s cricket correspondent.

He was a former professional cricketer, who bowled for Leicestershire, won three test caps for England, and played in three one day internationals.

Agnew received an MBE (Member of the Order of the British Empire) for services to broadcasting.


Imran Amed, founder, CEO, and editor-in-chief of The Business of Fashion

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Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images

The Business of Fashion started out as a blog written from former McKinsey management consultant Amed’s sofa but has now grown to become one of the fashion industry’s most influential titles.

The Business of Fashion raised a seed round in 2013, followed by a Series A round in 2015 for an undisclosed amount, with participation investors including Felix Capital, Index Ventures, LVMH, and Carmen Busquets.

Amed is also an associate lecturer at Central St Martin’s College of Fashion and Design and has been named in British GQ’s list of the 100 most influential men in Britain, Fast Company’s list of the most creative people in business, and Wired UK’s list of the most influential digital figures.

He received an MBE for services to fashion.


Karen Fraser, director of the Advertising Association

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LinkedIn

Fraser is the director of Credos, the advertising industry’s think tank, which produced the high-profile “Advertising Pays” reports, demonstrating how much the sector contributes to the UK’s economy.

Other important Credos reports have included its contribution to “The Bailey Review,” which looked into the commercialisation and sexualisation of childhood; “The Whole Picture,” on the portrayal of people from ethnic minorities in advertising; and the “Pretty as a Picture” report that looked into advertising and body confidence.

Fraser is also the Advertising Association’s strategy director. Prior to joining the Advertising Association in 2010, Fraser was the founder of the Ethical Reputation Index, which tracked the corporate ethical reputations of companies.

She was awarded an MBE for services to diversity and equality in the advertising industry.


Terry Jones, founder of i-D

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Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images

Jones founded the street style fashion magazine i-D in 1980 and is credited for having an astute eye for talent spotting and starting and boosting the careers of many successful creatives, such as Dylan Jones, who went on to edit GQ and fashion writer Caryn Franklin.

i-D Group was acquired by Vice Group in 2012.

In 2013, Jones and his wife Tricia received the “Outstanding Achievement Award” at the British Fashion Awards.

Jones was awarded with an OBE for services to fashion and popular culture.


Les Ratcliffe, head of community relations at Jaguar Land Rover

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LinkedIn

Ratcliffe joined Jaguar in 1973 after five years serving in the army. He first began working in production and also worked in assembly development before becoming a manager of community relations in 1998.

He’s now head of community relations, responsible for corporate governance and social responsibility at the automaker. Under Ratcliffe’s leadership, Jaguar Land Rober now has a community programme that contributes more than £1.4 million per year back to the community.

Ratcliffe was awarded with an MBE for services to business, education, and the community.


Peter Dazeley, photographer

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Dazeley/Wikimedia Commons

Dazeley, whose parents also both received MBEs, is an award-winning photographer.

He is known for shooting still life, people, lifestyle, advertising, and fine art.

Dazeley was awarded an MBE for services to photography and charity.


Tony Halmos, former director of public relations at the City of London Corporation

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LinkedIn

Halmos stepped down from his role as director of public relations at the City of London corporation in 2015, after 21 years at the organisation.

He is now director of the commission on London at King’s College’s Policy Institute.

Halmos was awarded an MBE for his services to the 800th anniversary of the Magna Carta, which took place in 2015.

Trump told the mayor of a disappearing island not to worry about sea-level rise — these photos show how grave the situation has become

Boys who live on Tangier Island, a sliver of land in Virginia that is disappearing because of sea-level rise fueled by climate change.

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Boys who live on Tangier Island, a sliver of land in Virginia that is disappearing because of sea-level rise fueled by climate change.
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Christian Storm/Business Insider

Twelve miles from either coast of the Chesapeake Bay sits a small island in danger of disappearing.

Tangier Island, Virginia, is one of the most isolated and extraordinary places in the continental US. But the island sits just 4 feet or so above sea level, and a 2015 report suggests little of it will be left in 50 years.

President Donald Trump, however, disagrees. The Daily Times of Salisbury, Maryland, reported last year that after Trump saw a CNN report about Tangier Island, the president called Mayor James “Ooker” Eskridge to tell him he shouldn’t worry about a rise in sea levels.

“He said, ‘Your island has been there for hundreds of years, and I believe your island will be there for hundreds more,'” Eskridge told The Daily Times.

Chesapeake Requiem,” a book by Earl Swift set to be released later this summer, paints a timely portrait of the 200-year-old crabbing community as it faces extinction from rising water levels. Swift spent the past two years with residents on the island, which he says could become the US’s “first climate casualty.”

The photos below show how serious the problem has become there.

Christian Storm contributed to this story.


Tangier Island has been losing ground to erosion for hundreds of years.

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Destroyed crab shacks on the island.
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Adrees Latif

But the combination of rising sea levels and more severe weather — both augmented by climate change — have increased the rate of land loss.

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Christian Storm/Business Insider

Records indicate that in the mid-1800s, Tangier Island encompassed about 2,060 acres. It was home to watermelon farms, grazing cows, and a variety of plant life.

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Adrees Latif/Reuters

But since 1850, over 66% of Tangier’s landmass has disappeared underwater.

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Adrees Latif/Reuters

Source: Nature


Research suggests Tangier is losing 9 acres of land a year to erosion and rising tides.

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Christian Storm/Business Insider

“We have a pretty high degree of certainty that things are going to get wetter and wetter,” Carlton Hershner Jr., a climate-change scientist at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, told The Associated Press in 2013. “Not to be a bearer of bad news for Tangier, but that would suggest that sometime in the next 50 to 100 years the island would basically be underwater.”


Just 1.2 square miles, Tangier Island is home to more than 500 full-time residents, down from over 1,000. The total continues to drop every year.

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Christian Storm/Business Insider

The island is reachable only by boat — it’s a 1-1/2-hour ferry ride from the coast. That keeps the place mostly closed off from the rest of the world.

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Adrees Latif/Reuters

Some islanders go years without seeing the mainland, getting supplies from the mail boat that arrives in the harbor every day.

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Adrees Latif/Reuters

Most of the men on the island work as commercial crabbers and oyster fishermen — or watermen — and send their catch to the mainland by boat.

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Rudy Shores, a local fisherman, sorts through soft-shell crabs at his crab shack on Tangier Island in August.
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Adrees Latif

But being a waterman is becoming increasingly difficult. In an effort to prevent overfishing, Virginia placed a moratorium on new crabbing licenses, and other restrictions have reduced the length of fishing seasons.

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Adrees Latif/Reuters

Ricky Laird, 44, was born on Tangier Island and showed the Business Insider photographer Christian Storm around the island in 2014.

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Christian Storm/Business Insider

“You don’t have to worry about traffic jams and murders, child molesters, rapists, and thieves,” Laird said. “You can leave your doors open. You don’t have to lock anything.”

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Adrees Latif/Reuters

Laird and other locals share a thick accent that’s equal parts Southern twang and Irish brogue. Vowels are extended to multiple syllables, making certain words hard to understand for outsiders.


“Tangier’s laid-back,” Laird said. “It’s a nice place, and everything’s reasonable here.”

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Adrees Latif/Reuters

One of the most striking signs of the rapidly disappearing island is the Uppards, a beautiful area on Tangier’s north end, where multiple families once lived year-round.

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Adrees Latif/Reuters

Today, the Uppards has almost succumbed to the rising water levels, turning into a swampy wetland.

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Adrees Latif/Reuters

Major portions are submerged, reachable only by skiff.

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Adrees Latif/Reuters

A solitary dilapidated mobile trailer on the beach is one of the few signs that humans ever lived there.

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Christian Storm/Business Insider

Laird recalled playing with his friends in the Uppards and hunting ducks there with his father. But despite the stark scene, he doesn’t seem worried.

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Adrees Latif/Reuters

“The island ain’t goin’ nowhere,” Laird said. “They talk about erosion, but it’s been here forever, and it ain’t gone nowhere in forever.”

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Adrees Latif/Reuters

Because of the island’s low elevation and lack of space, tombstones are on the front lawns of the homes on Tangier.

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Christian Storm/Business Insider

In the photo below, from 2017, a tombstone lies submerged at the water’s edge in the Uppards part of Tangier Island.

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Adrees Latif

Europeans, led by Capt. John Smith, first explored Tangier Island in 1608, though it had been a spot for the Pocomoke Nation long before that.

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Christian Storm/Business Insider

Legend has it that John Crockett – still a common surname on the island – was the first to inhabit Tangier full time when he arrived with his eight sons in 1686.


In the 19th century, Tangier became home to annual Methodist meetings. It has been a religious stronghold ever since.

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Christian Storm/Business Insider

The island shuts down every Sunday morning and once denied Hollywood filmmakers permission to shoot the PG-13 Kevin Costner movie “Message in a Bottle” there because of the script’s mentions of swearing, sex, and drinking.

Tangier is dry; booze is unavailable for purchase.


Even if the island survives the next 100 years, residents of Tangier wonder whether anyone will still want to live there in the future.

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Christian Storm/Business Insider

“I’d like to be able to do this for the rest of my life,” said Laird’s 24-year-old son, Nick. “It’s kind of scary to think you might not be able to.”

Nick is following in his father’s footsteps and becoming a waterman.


Years ago, this career path was the norm for boys on the island. But nowadays, Nick is in the minority. Many young people leave Tangier — some for college, others for the military, and several to find partners, since romance can be difficult on such a small island.

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Adrees Latif/Reuters

When Business Insider spoke with Laird, he said the fourth-grade class had just one boy.

“A lot of kids nowadays, it just doesn’t appeal to them,” Nick said. “They see mainstream culture, and they say, ‘Hey, I think I’d like to move off, get a car, get a house, go to the mall.'”


Tangier’s residents are mostly Republican — a majority voted for Trump in 2016. But the president’s comments suggest he’s unlikely to help the island face the challenges climate change has created.

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Christian Storm/Business Insider

To persuade some of the town’s residents to take action, a group of Republican climate activists went to the island in August.

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Former Rep. Bob Inglis speaking with a resident.
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Adrees Latif

“We’ll talk to everybody,” Eskridge said. “But they’re not going to change many minds here.”

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Eskridge at the Fisherman’s Corner restaurant on Tangier Island.
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Adrees Latif

Source: Reuters


According to Eskridge, most residents reject climate change. Many would prefer to receive a new seawall than consider the long-term effects of carbon emissions on sea-level rise.

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Adrees Latif

In recent years, Tangier Island has become a poster child of the nation’s climate crisis.

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Adrees Latif/Reuters

This approach to climate change is not unique to Tangier. About one-third of Americans do not support regulating pollution from coal-fired power plants, which are large drivers of carbon emissions.

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People arriving by ferry to Tangier Island.
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Adrees Latif

Source: Yale Program on Climate Change Communication


To many residents of Tangier, however, the threat of their island vanishing still seems like a far-off future.

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Adrees Latif

“They say in about 100 years this island’s gonna be disappeared, but I’m not going to college — I’m going to work on the water here,” one young Tangier Island resident told Business Insider in 2014. “I’m not going to be living in another 100 years either.”

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Christian Storm/Business Insider

Data reveals the 20 most popular TV shows of 2016

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Daenerys is the queen of TV.
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HBO

“Game of Thrones” was by far the most popular show around the world in 2016, according to a new analysis from Parrot Analytics. “The Walking Dead” came in second, followed by “Pretty Little Liars” and “Westworld.”

Parrot analyzed not only ratings data (where available) but also peer-to-peer sharing, social media chatter, and other factors to estimate viewer demand for various shows. These combined measurements determine each show’s “demand expressions” per day. Though the formula is opaque, the ranking appears to be one of the best ways to compare shows across platforms and measure how popular they really are.

What other shows ruled the past year? Check out the top 20 below.


1) HBO’s “Game of Thrones” with 7.2 million demand expressions per day. People around the world were desperate to learn the fate of Jon Snow and watch the rise of Daenerys Targaryen, as the epic adaptation moved past the novels into uncharted territory.

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HBO.

2) AMC’s “The Walking Dead” with 4.7 million demand expressions per day. The shocking beginning of season 7 led to an explosion in social media interest.

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AMC

3) ABC’s “Pretty Little Liars” with 3.8 million demand expressions per day. This teen drama had a devoted following through seven seasons and its series finale in October.

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Freeform

4) HBO’s “Westworld” with 3.5 million demand expressions per day. Just what the network needs as “Game of Thrones” approaches its end. Note that this average might be inflated since the show has only been around for a few months.

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John P. Johnson/HBO

5) The CW’s “The Flash” with 3.1 million demand expressions per day. He’s the top super hero on TV, leading a list of popular DC Comics shows.

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CWTV

6) CBS’s “The Big Bang Theory” with 2.9 million demand expressions per day. An unstoppable force on US TV, this nine-season-old sitcom is also hot around the world.

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CBS

7) Netflix’s “The OA” with 2.8 million demand expressions per day. WARNING: This rating is definitely inflated, since the show launched in December, and people tend to binge watch Netflix shows. Still, it’s a monumental launch that could signify the next big show.

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Netflix; Facebook

8) Netflix’s “Stranger Things” with 2.5 million demand expressions per day. This rating may be inflated too, as the show has only been around for a few months. Still, it’s another explosive launch for Netflix.

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Netflix

9) Korea’s “Running Man” with 2.4 million demand expressions per day. The variety game show is the top non-American show in the world.

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SBS

10) USA’s “Suits” with 2.4 million demand expressions per day. The playful legal drama has surprised a lot of people with its depth over six seasons.

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USA Network

11) The CW’s “Arrow” with 2.1 million demand expressions per day. The program that kicked off the new era of DC Comics shows is going strong in its fifth season.

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Liane Hentscher/ The CW

12) ABC’s “Quantico” with 2.1 million demand expressions per day. Priyanka Chopra, a Miss World winner and Bollywood star, has emerged as a global star with this FBI thriller.

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ABC/Phillipe Bosse

13) MTV’s “Teen Wolf” with 2.0 million demand expressions per day. This supernatural drama, now in its sixth season, clearly has a devoted following.

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MTV

14) Japan’s “One Piece” with 1.9 million demand expressions per day. Now in its 18th season, this is the top anime series in the world.

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“One Piece”

15) Fox’s “Gotham” with 1.9 million demand expressions per day. It’s yet another DC Comics show, this one a prequel to Batman.

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Jeff Neumann/FOX

16) The CW’s “The Vampire Diaries” with 1.8 million demand expressions per day. The supernatural drama is finishing strong in its eighth and final season.

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The Vampire Diaries screencap

17) Netflix’s “Marvel’s Luke Cage” with 1.8 million demand expressions per day.

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Netflix

18) Japan’s “Naruto: Shippuden” with 1.8 million demand expressions per day.

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Naruto: Shippuden

19) History’s “Vikings” with 1.7 million demand expressions per day.

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The History Channel

20) USA’s “Mr. Robot” with 1.7 million demand expressions per day.

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USA

Bonus: The rest of the top 30

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ABC

21) ABC’s “Grey’s Anatomy” with 1.6 million demand expressions per day.

22) NBC’s “Friends” with 1.6 million.

23) FX’s “American Horror Story” with 1.6 million.

24) ABC’s “Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” with 1.6 million.

25) The CW’s “Supernatural” with 1.5 million.

26) The CW’s “DC’s Legends of Tomorrow” with 1.5 million.

27) Netflix’s “House of Cards” with 1.4 million.

28) ABC’s “Once Upon A Time” with 1.4 million.

29) AMC’s “Breaking Bad” with 1.4 million.

30) HBO’s “The Night Of” with 1.4 million.

Correction: A previous version of this post stated that the demand expression numbers were per month rather than per day.

‘This is borderline treasonous’: Liberal activists accuse Trump of flirting with treason for praising Putin

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President-elect Donald Trump.
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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Liberal activists turned to Twitter to suggest President-elect Donald Trump was nearing the line of treason with his Friday praise of Russian President Vladimir Putin.

“I don’t think Trump committed treason with this tweet, but he’s in the neighborhood,” wrote Judd Legum, the editor of ThinkProgress.

Trump said earlier that Putin made a “great move” by choosing not to respond to sanctions leveled by President Barack Obama’s administration this week in retaliation for suspected election-related hacking.

The president-elect’s message was retweeted by the Russian Embassy in the US, a move that poured gasoline on the already controversial tweet.

“What’s the threshold for treason?” wrote DeRay Mckesson, a prominent Black Lives Matter activist who briefly ran as a Baltimore mayoral candidate this year.

“I hope you get charged with treason you melted Hostess snack cake,” tweeted an MTV News writer.

Others echoed the sentiment.

“This is borderline treasonous,” wrote Jamil Smith, a senior national correspondent at MTV News. “I don’t know what Putin has on this cat, but my Lord, it must be incredible. God help us.”

“Not helping on this whole treason thing, are you, buddy?” Eric Garland, a research analyst, asked rhetorically.

John Aravosis, a Democratic digital strategist, said Trump was displaying “un-American behavior.” When a Twitter user accused him of being overly dramatic, Aravosis replied that he found “skirting with treason pretty dramatic.”

Trump has been reluctant to blame election-related hacking on Russia, despite US intelligence agencies saying the country was behind the cyberattacks.

Instead, the president-elect has repeatedly suggested he would like the US to have a warmer relationship with Russia and work together on issues like combatting terrorism.