Yearly Archives: 2019

3 statistics show why Anthony Joshua was able to beat Andy Ruiz Jr. so easily second time around

Anthony Joshua celebrates.

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Anthony Joshua celebrates.
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Photo by Valery SharifulinTASS via Getty Images

  • Anthony Joshua easily beat Andy Ruiz Jr. in a world heavyweight championship rematch on Saturday.
  • Combat sport statistician Compubox highlighted three statistics that help explain Joshua’s victory.
  • He relied on his jab, boxed at range, and minimized Andy Ruiz Jr.’s punch output.
  • These are things he did not do in the first fight, a knockout loss, six months ago.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Anthony Joshua was easily able to beat Andy Ruiz Jr. in their rematch on Saturday, and there are three statistics that help explain why.

The British heavyweight boxed at range, relied on his jab, and minimized the former champion’s punch output in their 12-round tactical battle at the Diriyah Arena in Saudi Arabia.

Joshua’s dominance in the do-over was a contrast to the humiliation he endured when he was toppled four times by Ruiz Jr. in June, defeated for the first time as a professional boxer at Madison Square Garden in New York City earlier this year, surrendering his world championship belts to the Mexican.

This weekend he won them all back.

And Compubox, a data specialist in combat sport, used statistics to help explain why.

  1. 65 of Joshua’s 107 landed punches were jabs
  2. 93% of the fight was at distance
  3. Ruiz landed just 23% of his total punches

Reliance on the jab

More than 60% of Joshua’s punches were jabs. This is a stark contrast to the first fight, in which he deserted the jab for power, particularly in round three, where he exchanged knockdowns with his opponent.

A consistent jab in the rematch allowed Joshua to keep Ruiz Jr. at arm’s length, which utilized the physical advantages he had over the Mexican. At 6-foot-6 and with an 82-inch reach, Joshua is taller and longer than Ruiz Jr., who is four inches shorter and has a wingspan that is inferior by eight inches.

By making the rematch a jabbing fight, Joshua fought his fight, not Ruiz Jr.’s.

Boxing at distance

In the first fight six months ago, Joshua had Ruiz Jr. down in the third round but got greedy and sought the finish. When he did so, he entered a space that Ruiz Jr. relishes – the inside.

As soon as Joshua was on the inside and in range of Ruiz Jr.’s shorter, crisper, and faster punches, he found himself on the floor, fighting the rest of the fight with a concussion.

In the rematch, Joshua did not make the same mistake. He boxed at range instead of the inside, and by keeping the fight at a distance for 93% of the 12-round and 36-minute duration, he ensured he kept himself out of danger.

Staying away from Ruiz Jr.

Relying on his jab and boxing at distance provided an excellent defense against Ruiz Jr., who, as a result, was only able to land 23% of his total punches.

Read more:

Andy Ruiz Jr. says he lost his world titles to Anthony Joshua because he was undertrained, overweight, and partied for 3 months

A nervous Anthony Joshua exorcised his New York humiliation by outboxing Andy Ruiz Jr. to win his world titles back in style

Deontay Wilder says Anthony Joshua will keep avoiding him even if he beats Andy Ruiz Jr.

Saudi Arabia’s Andy Ruiz Jr. vs. Anthony Joshua fight is littered with athletes who have been busted for drug use

The $100 million Andy Ruiz vs. Anthony Joshua fight is ‘masking a darker truth’ in Saudi Arabia, and boxing is burying its head in the sand

Wladimir Klitschko says Anthony Joshua should never have lost to Andy Ruiz Jr. and expects him to dominate once again at heavyweight

Trump showed off 2 convicted and charged war criminals at a secretive Republican fundraiser in Florida, report says

  • President Donald Trump brought on stage one convicted and one accused war criminal at a highly secretive GOP fundraiser in Florida on Saturday night, the Miami Herald reported.
  • The president debuted former US Army 1st Lt. Clint Lorance and former US Army Maj. Mathew Golsteyn at the Statesman’s Dinner in Aventura, the Herald said.
  • Lorance was convicted of ordering soldiers to engage three unarmed Afghan men and was sentenced to 19 years in prison, while Golsteyn was accused of killing an unarmed Afghan man in 2010.
  • Trump granted clemency to both their cases last month.
  • The Daily Beast reported two weeks ago that Trump had been mulling bringing Lorance, Golsteyn, and Navy SEAL Chief Edward Gallagher on the 2020 campaign trail with him.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

President Donald Trump showed off two pardoned US troops at a highly secretive Republican fundraising event in Aventura, Florida on Saturday night, the Miami Herald reported.

He brought on stage former US Army 1st Lt. Clint Lorance and former US Army Maj. Mathew Golsteyn during his hour-long speech at the state Republican Party’s annual Statesman’s Dinner, the Herald reported, calling the move “unusual.”

Lorance was convicted of ordering soldiers to engage three unarmed Afghan men and was sentenced to 19 years in prison, while Golsteyn was accused of killing an unarmed Afghan man in 2010.

Trump pardoned both men last month by granting clemency to both their cases. Golsteyn had been awaiting trial at the time.

US Army Maj. Mathew Golsteyn was accused of killing an unarmed Afghan man in 2010

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US Army Maj. Mathew Golsteyn was accused of killing an unarmed Afghan man in 2010
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Fox News

This year’s Statesman’s Dinner was particularly secretive, with attendees having to check their cellphones into individual locked cases before entering the event at the JW Marriott Miami Turnberry Resort & Spa, which is in Aventura, the Herald reported. The dinner was also closed to reporters.

The dinner raised a total of $3.5 million for the state’s Republican Party, the Herald said.

During his speech, which lasted more than an hour, the president also did impressions of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and GOP Rep. Jim Jordan – two key lawmakers involved in the impeachment investigation – and brought on stage son-in-law Jared Kushner, the Herald reported.

Attendees told the newspaper Trump was “hilarious” and “in rare form.”

The debut of Lorance and Golsteyn at the fundraiser comes two weeks after The Daily Beast reported that Trump was considering having pardoned US troops join him on the 2020 campaign trail.

The Beast cited two unnamed sources saying they overheard Trump discussing appearances by Lorance, Golsteyn, and Navy SEAL Chief Edward Gallagher, who was convicted of posing with a corpse of a dead ISIS fighter.

Trump in November told the Navy to reverse its decision to demote Gallagher, against the advice of military officials, cause controversy and ultimately forced the resignation of Secretary of the Navy Richard Spencer.

JW Marriott Miami Turnberry Resort & Spa in Aventura, Florida, where the dinner was held.

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JW Marriott Miami Turnberry Resort & Spa in Aventura, Florida, where the dinner was held.
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JW Marriott Miami Turnberry Resort & Spa/YouTube

The fundraiser comes as Trump faces increasing risk of getting impeached. Pelosi announced last week that the House would move forward with articles of impeachment against the president. The White House on Friday refused to take part in impeachment hearings.

The founder of $1 billion self-driving truck firm TuSimple says human truckers having to spend hours on the road is a ‘tarnish on the glory of humanity’

Xiaodi Hou is TuSimple's founder, president and chief technology officer.

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Xiaodi Hou is TuSimple’s founder, president and chief technology officer.
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Courtesy of TuSimple

  • The founder of self-driving truck firm TuSimple, Xiaodi Hou, says that truck drivers being required to work long hours on the road is a “tarnish on the glory of humanity.”
  • Hou was responding to a question about human truckers who fear that automated trucking might lose them their jobs.
  • TuSimple, which is valued at over $1 billion, develops tech to automate long-haul truck journeys without human intervention needed, though its vehicles still have a human as a failsafe. The company straddles both China and the US.
  • Speaking to Business Insider, Hou also explained why traditional trucking associations are actively working with, and not against, his firm.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The founder of self-driving truck unicorn TuSimple says that human truck drivers being required to work long hours on the road is a “tarnish on the glory of humanity.”

Xiaodi Hou is the founder, president and chief technology officer of TuSimple, which develops tech for automating long-haul truck journeys without human intervention needed. The self-driving trucks still have a human truck driver and an engineer present at all times, as a failsafe.

The company is based in San Diego, California, and splits its operations with China. The firm’s US presence comprises offices in San Diego, California and Tucson, Arizona, from which it oversees its long-haul US operations.

It also boasts offices in Beijing, Shanghai, and Fukuoka, Japan. Hou said he will expand its presence further in the next two to three years – a goal he said stemmed from “the confidence of our general stability.”

Founded in 2015, TuSimple has enjoyed huge investor interest. It was valued at just over $1 billion after a $95 million Series D fundraise in February. It went on to add a further $120 million, bringing the round to $215 million. Its backers include global delivery giant UPS, US chipmaker Nvidia, and Chinese tech firm Sina, owner of Weibo.

Though TuSimple currently retrofits existing trucks for pre-existing truck companies, it aims to have a factory-produced self-driving truck on the road by 2023.

TuSimple doesn’t think it will completely replace drivers with self-driving trucks

Speaking to Business Insider, Hou was asked how he’d respond to truckers who (rightly or wrongly) fear that their jobs are at risk.

“This is my first time responding to this question in English, but here goes,” he said. “To drive a truck for 11 hours per day, without even taking a shower every day, and getting far away from their home, is really a tarnish on the glory of humanity.

“You don’t hire chimney sweeps nowadays, and people don’t harvest the way they did 500 years ago.”

Asked what he’d say to those truckers who value the work, Hou said his company complements – and doesn’t compete with – the traditional trucking industry.

“The transition is actually slower than you thought,” he explained. “The transition is not like, ‘tomorrow, all of sudden, trucks will be autonomously driven.’ It’s not like that. Autonomous driving is more likely to involve the retrofitting of existing trucks rather than the building of new trucks.

A self-driving truck retrofitted with TuSimple's tech.

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A self-driving truck retrofitted with TuSimple’s tech.
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Courtesy of TuSimple

“It’ll be a very gradual thing, and truck drivers still need to [drive] trucks. Think about the gap we have [in terms of] truck driver shortage. The average truck driver age is 51. I don’t think even [on] a very optimistic view, we can fill up that gap within the time frame it needs to be filled.”

According to a July 2019 report by the American Trucking Associations, the US trucking industry was 60,000 drivers short of the number required to meet industry needs in 2018, up nearly 20% from 2017’s shortage of 50,700.

“Secondly, we don’t actually think self-driving trucks are going to deprive any truck drivers [of their jobs],” Hou continued. “I don’t think we’re going to be enemies of the truck drivers. We’re actually very good friends with the American Trucking Associations.

“We’re helping the associations to solve problems that they can’t solve alone, by themselves.”

Mysterious automated calls, vanished relatives, and sinister Facebook comments: How China intimidates Uighurs who don’t even live in the country

A protester wearing a mask painted with the colors of the flag of East Turkestan — what Uighurs call Xinjiang — and a hand bearing the colors of the Chinese flag outside the Chinese consulate in Istanbul, Turkey, in July 2018.

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A protester wearing a mask painted with the colors of the flag of East Turkestan — what Uighurs call Xinjiang — and a hand bearing the colors of the Chinese flag outside the Chinese consulate in Istanbul, Turkey, in July 2018.
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OZAN KOSE/AFP/Getty Images

  • China is waging a widespread, coordinated mass crackdown on its Uighur Muslim minority.
  • Though the brutal campaign is most active in the western Chinese region of Xinjiang, the Uighurs’ homeland, many Uighurs abroad say they have also been targeted by Chinese agents.
  • Members of the Uighur diaspora described receiving mysterious automated calls, eerie Facebook comments, and being threatened by Mandarin Chinese speakers in real life.
  • Uighurs abroad have also discovered their relatives in Xinjiang vanished by Chinese authorities days after they spoke out for the Uighurs.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

China’s unprecedented oppression of Uighur Muslims goes beyond the borders of Xinjiang, the western Chinese region where most of the ethnic minority live, former residents told Business Insider.

Under President Xi Jinping, China is waging a widespread counterterrorism campaign on Xinjiang, also known to Uighurs as East Turkestan. It is a paranoid move in response to a spate of ethnic riots between Uighurs and Han Chinese, the dominant ethnic group in the country, ten years ago.

The Communist Party sees Uighurs’ religion – Islam – as a threat, and often conflates it with religious extremism.

For this reason, China apparently feels the need to control the Uighur diaspora outside the country in case they return home and carry out attacks.

Police patrol on a scooter as an ethnic Uighur boy stands in his doorway in the old town of Kashgar, Xinjiang, in June 2017.

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Police patrol on a scooter as an ethnic Uighur boy stands in his doorway in the old town of Kashgar, Xinjiang, in June 2017.
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Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

Leaked classified documents, published by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists last month, showed a concerted effort by regional officials to keep a close eye on Uighurs with foreign citizenship, wherever they are.

“For those still outside the country for whom suspected terrorism cannot be ruled out, the border control reading will be carried out by hand to ensure that they are arrested the moment they cross the border,” one government bulletin said.

“For those … whom suspected terrorism cannot be ruled out, they should first be placed into concentrated education and training for examination,” it added, referring to tightly-secured detention camps in the region, where former inmates say they are physically and psychologically tortured.

‘Family and friends suffer the consequences’

Several members of the Uighur diaspora told Business Insider they’ve also been spooked by China without even having to step foot in the country.

Rushan Abbas, a Uighur activist living in Herndon, Virginia, discovered last September that her sister had been disappeared by Xinjiang authorities six days after she spoke out against China’s human rights record. She still has no idea of her whereabouts.

“The Chinese government is basically holding her hostage for my speaking out about the horrific blatant human rights abuses of the Chinese government,” Abbas told Business Insider last month.

“My sister’s story is not unique. China harasses Uighurs in the diaspora’s relatives back home, presenting them with heartbreaking choice: Keep silent about the horrific violations of human rights, or let your family and friends suffer the consequences for your choice for speaking out,” she said.

“I am an example of that.”

Bahram Sintash (right) and his father, Qurban Mamut, during Mamut's February 2017 visit to Washington, DC.

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Bahram Sintash (right) and his father, Qurban Mamut, during Mamut’s February 2017 visit to Washington, DC.
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Courtesy of Bahram Sintash

An entire business gone

Abbas is not the only foreign Uighur who has been punished in Xinjiang for their actions outside the region.

Bahram Sintash, a Uighur-American living in Chantilly, Virginia, has been campaigning for his father’s release from the Xinjiang camps since October 2018. He has called on the Chinese government to reveal the whereabouts of his father, a retired magazine editor, through social media, protests, and speaking to journalists.

Sintash has been living in the US since 2008, but continued to visit his family in Xinjiang until 2015, when his Chinese visa was inexplicably revoked. That same year, he had opened a company in Urumqi, Xinjiang’s capital city, to provide fitness supplements and workout plans to Uighurs in the region.

Sintash requested anonymity for his company to protect its former employees. But he said the business flourished, and had earned close to a million dollars.

That success came to an end in October 2018 – exactly two days after Sintash spoke to Radio Free Asia about his father’s disappearance for the first time.

Sintash's father Qurban Mamut in Washington, DC, during a February 2017 visit.

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Sintash’s father Qurban Mamut in Washington, DC, during a February 2017 visit.
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Courtesy of Bahram Sintash

Multiple police officers went to the company’s office in Urumqi, took photos of every corner of the office, and told employees to leave as soon as possible, Sintash told Business Insider.

Shortly after the raid, police officers further questioned his colleagues, shut down his office, storage warehouse, and corporate social media accounts, he said.

“The police warned my partners to stop communicating with me and told them I was the enemy of the country living overseas,” Sintash said.

“I couldn’t get my money back from the region,” he added. “I can no longer contact any business partners or my teammates or my customers.”

Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Great Hall of the People, Beijing, in November 2018.

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Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Great Hall of the People, Beijing, in November 2018.
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Thomas Peter/Getty

Sintash said he learned the news of his company’s collapse not from any official correspondence from Xinjiang authorities, but from one of his customers.

There’s no other way to verify it: His mother blocked him on WeChat last year for fear of getting in trouble with authorities, and all his phone calls to regional authorities about his father have gone unanswered.

Mysterious automated calls and Facebook messages

As some Uighurs lose touch with their family on the phone, others have received menacing messages from Chinese-speaking agents.

A protester wears a mask painted with Xinjiang or East Turkestan's flag and tears of blood in Brussels in April 2018.

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A protester wears a mask painted with Xinjiang or East Turkestan’s flag and tears of blood in Brussels in April 2018.
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Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty

Guly Mahsut, a Uighur Canadian living in Ottawa, reported receiving multiple automated calls from Mandarin Chinese-speaking agents in recent weeks.

A female caller had identified herself as the Chinese embassy and told her to pick up some documents. Mahsut told Business Insider that even as she kept blocking the numbers calling her, she kept receiving the same automated calls from other numbers.

It’s not clear how the caller got Mahsut’s phone number, what documents she is referring to, and why Mahsut was receiving these calls. Earlier this year she publicly questioned China’s claim that it had released most inmates from Xinjiang’s detention centers, telling Agence France-Presse she knew of a cousin and two friends still in the camps.

Listen to one of the recordings Mahsut received below, accompanied with a rough translation of the message verified by Business Insider:

The Chinese Embassy in Ottawa told Business Insider this call was a “telecommunications fraud,” calling the caller “law breakers [who] use technical means to disguise phone numbers as embassies and consulates.” It added that the alleged scam is “not targeted at a specific group of people.”

Some 30 members of the Uighur diaspora in Norway have received dozens of automated calls from phone numbers connected to the Chinese embassy in Oslo, Al Jazeera reported last month.

One of the Uighurs, a naturalized Norwegian citizen, said she started receiving the calls after attending an anti-China rally on October 1.

The Chinese embassy in Oslo denied the calls in a similar manner to the London embassy, saying they were part of a scam.

Uighurs living in the US and France also told The Daily Beast and Foreign Policy last year that they had been asked for personal information including license plate numbers, bank details, ID photos, and marriage certificates – and threatened harm to their families in Xinjiang if they did not comply.

Uighur men pray before a meal during the Corban Festival, also known as Eid al-Adha, in Turpan, Xinjiang, in September 2016.

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Uighur men pray before a meal during the Corban Festival, also known as Eid al-Adha, in Turpan, Xinjiang, in September 2016.
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Kevin Frayer/Getty

Sintash, the fitness company owner, has also received messages in Chinese threatening to harm his family.

A Facebook comment that Bahram Sintash received from a Chinese-speaking account in January 2019.

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A Facebook comment that Bahram Sintash received from a Chinese-speaking account in January 2019.
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Facebook

In January 2019, he received a comment in simplified Chinese on Facebook, in response to a comment he had left in the Uighur language on another person’s page.

“You are a good son of the Chinese Communist Party. Your father has been released now,” the comment read, without providing any evidence.

“I reckon you can keep selling your white powder [crying-eyes emoji],” the comment continued, in what Sintash took to mean his fitness supplements. “Strongly support you.”

The account was registered under a Chinese name, and its profile photo was of a young Chinese woman.

The entire account has since been deleted. Business Insider last saw the post in February, and has preserved screenshots of the comment.

“What I understood [from the comment] was: ‘Keep obeying the Chinese Communist Party and shut your mouth. Your father is in our hands,'” Sintash told Business Insider.

“I felt threatened by the CCP.”

Trolling people is not a new Chinese tactic. The country’s propaganda department pays some two million people to publish pro-government posts and attack critics on social media, a Harvard University report found in 2016.

These commenters are known as the “wumao dang,” which translates to “50 cent party” in Chinese – a reference to the amount of money in yuan they are allegedly paid per post. That’s about $0.07.

‘Your mother has died’

Another bizarre run-in with Chinese speakers took place in late October, when Sintash and other Uighur activists staged a protest outside the Capital One Arena in downtown Washington, DC.

As Sintash and 13 others held up signs and chanted slogans, a Han Chinese man – the largest ethnic group – went up to them and said: “Your mother has died” five times.

Video shows the group looking at the man, puzzled, as he walked away.

“He was a pro-CCP Chinese citizen who could’ve said anything to define [himself] … but he chose to tell us ‘your mother has died,'” Sintash said.

“I was shocked at the time. I never expected someone to deliver such an evil message while in the United States.”

Those words were particularly jarring to Sintash, who hadn’t spoken to his mother or anyone else in his family since February 2018. To this day, he still has no idea who that man was.

A man on his phone in Tiananmen Square, Beijing.

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A man on his phone in Tiananmen Square, Beijing.
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Feng Li/Getty

Will these threats stop Uighurs from speaking out for their families trapped in China? Probably not.

“They cannot control us,” Sintash said. “China looks for people who are weaker mentally. I am different … I have the US behind me.”

“I never cared about politics in the past,” he added. “What China is doing to the people in the region – we have to speak up. We have to stand up.”

Authorities are reportedly investigating whether the Pensacola Navy base gunman posted anti-American tweets before the deadly shooting

Naval Air Station Pensacola is seen in an aerial view in Pensacola, Florida, U.S. August 14, 2012.

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Naval Air Station Pensacola is seen in an aerial view in Pensacola, Florida, U.S. August 14, 2012.
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US Navy/Patrick Nichols/Handout via Reuters

  • Investigators are reportedly looking into anti-American tweets sent shortly before a deadly shooting on Friday at a Navy base in Pensacola, Florida.
  • Three victims were killed in the attack and authorities fatally shot the gunman, whom authorities have identified as a Saudi national named Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani who was training in the US.
  • The SITE Intelligence Group said the tweets contained words that echoed Osama Bin Laden, though they did not claim allegiance to any specific group.
  • The New York Times reported that the account had criticized American foreign policy, calling the US a “nation of evil.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The FBI is reportedly looking into several anti-American tweets shortly before a deadly shooting at a Florida Navy base were sent by the gunman.

The Pensacola News Journal reported that the tweets were posted at 4:39 a.m. Friday, just hours before the shooting was reported. Three victims were killed in the attack and authorities fatally shot the gunman, whom authorities have identified as a Saudi national named Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani who was training in the US.

The SITE Intelligence Group described the tweets as containing words that echoed Osama Bin Laden, though they did not claim allegiance to any specific group.

The account has since been suspended, but the group said that the Twitter account had a name and photograph that matched the identity of the gunman. Law-enforcement agencies have not officially commented on the tweets.

A general view of the atmosphere at the Pensacola Naval Air Station following a shooting on December 06, 2019 in Pensacola, Florida.

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A general view of the atmosphere at the Pensacola Naval Air Station following a shooting on December 06, 2019 in Pensacola, Florida.
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Getty Images/Josh Brasted

The New York Times reported that the account had criticized American foreign policy, calling the US a “nation of evil.”

“I’m not against you for just being American,” the posts said, according to The Times. “I don’t hate you because your freedoms, I hate you because every day you supporting, funding and committing crimes not only against Muslims but also humanity.”

The tweets are just some of a number of disturbing details about the suspect that have come to light since the shooting, including that the gunman reportedly hosted a dinner party not long before the attack, in which the guests watched mass shooting videos.

Yet despite the details, US Defense Secretary Mark Esper said Saturday he could not confirm whether the attack was an act of terrorism, and that investigators needed to continue working to determine the motive.

The 2 US Navy sailors being hailed as heroes in the Pensacola shooting were fresh out of military training

Mohammed Haitham, left; and Joshua Watson, right.

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Mohammed Haitham, left; and Joshua Watson, right.
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Facebook

  • Two slain US service members who have been hailed for their perseverance during the mass shooting at Naval Air Station Pensacola in Florida recently finished their introductory training in the Navy.
  • Family members of two of the reported victims, Joshua Watson and Mohammed Haitham, say they were notified that the men tried assisting authorities during the shooting.
  • Both service members had recently graduated from their respective introductory training stations.
  • A previous incident during a mass shooting in Florida bore some semblance to the victims Naval Air Station incident.
  • Fifteen-year-old Peter Wang, an aspiring US Army soldier in the school’s Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (JROTC) program, was killed in the Parkland shooting after he held open a door to help dozens of classmates and school staff members escape.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Two slain US service members who have been hailed for their perseverance during the deadly shooting at Naval Air Station Pensacola in Florida, recently finished their introductory training in the Navy, paralleling another story marked with bravery from an aspiring troop wishing to serve in the armed forces.

The Navy announced the men’s identities on Saturday. They also confirmed that a third man, an airman apprentice named Cameron Scott Walters, was also killed.

Twenty-three-year-old Joshua Watson of Alabama was one of the three people killed in the shooting on Friday. Watson, an aspiring naval pilot, recently graduated from the US Naval Academy.

According to a Facebook post from his brother, Adam, Watson had informed first responders of the shooter’s details and location, despite “being shot multiple times.”

“Today has been the worst day of my life,” Adam said in the Facebook post. “My youngest brother gave his life for his country in a senseless shooting.”

“He died a hero and we are beyond proud but there is a hole in our hearts that can never be filled,” Adam added.

Watson, who was conducting flight training at the base, was the officer on deck during the shooting, his father, Benjamin, told USA Today. He added that his son wanted to join the military since he was five years old.

“Heavily wounded, he made his way out to flag down first responders and gave an accurate description of the shooter,” Benjamin told USA Today. “He died serving his country.”

Nineteen-year-old Mohammed Haitham of Florida, another victim, was also hailed for his service, his mother, Evelyn, told local media.

“The commander of his school did call me,” Evelyn, a Navy veteran, told the Tampa Bay Times. “He told me my son did try to stop the shooter.”

Haitham graduated from high school in 2018, joined the Navy, and had recently graduated from basic training. He was assigned to flight crew training in Florida, where he was expected to finish this month.

“He said he was going to get his flight jacket for Christmas,” Evelyn said. “Now that’s not going to happen.”

Capt. Tim Kinsella, the commanding officer at NAS Pensacola said in a statement that the sailors showed “excepctional heroism and bravery in the face of evil.”

“When confronted, they didn’t run from danger; they ran towards it and saved lives,” Kinsella said. “If not for their actions, and the actions of the Naval Security Force that were the first responders on the scene, this incident could have been far worse.”

Peter Wang.

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Peter Wang.
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Jesse Pan/Facebook

A previous incident in Florida bore some semblance to the victims Naval Air Station shooting. On February 14, 2018, a gunman opened fire at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, killing 17 people.

Fifteen-year-old Peter Wang, an aspiring US Army soldier in the school’s Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (JROTC) program, was one of the students who was shot multiple times and killed.

Wang, who was in his JROTC uniform during the shooting, held open a door to help dozens of classmates and school staff members escape from the carnage. He was posthumously accepted to the US Military Academy at West Point “for his heroic actions.”

The Pensacola Navy base shooter reportedly used a loophole to buy his gun legally

A general view of the atmosphere at the Pensacola Naval Air Station following a shooting on December 06, 2019 in Pensacola, Florida.

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A general view of the atmosphere at the Pensacola Naval Air Station following a shooting on December 06, 2019 in Pensacola, Florida.
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Getty Images/Josh Brasted

  • The Saudi national who fatally shot three people at a Florida Navy base on Friday bought his gun legally even though people designated as “nonimmigrant aliens” are not typically allowed to do so, NBC News reported.
  • But the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives says there are exceptions for those with a valid hunting license or permit, and those from “a friendly foreign government entering the United States on official law enforcement business.”
  • NBC News cited sources that said the shooter had a license and bought his weapon from a dealer in Pensacola.
  • The gunman, whom news outlets have identified as Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani, was a second lieutenant in the Saudi Air Force who was in the US as an aviation student.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The Saudi national who fatally shot three people at a Florida Navy base on Friday bought his gun legally even though so-called “nonimmigrant aliens” are not typically allowed to do so, NBC News reported Saturday.

The gunman, whom news outlets have identified as Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani, was a second lieutenant in the Saudi Air Force who was in the US as an aviation student.

Though non-citizens who hold US visas are typically barred from buying guns, NBC News reported that he exploited a loophole that allowed him to purchase one legally.

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives says anyone admitted to the US under a nonimmigrant visa is typically “prohibited from shipping, transporting, receiving, or possessing a firearm or ammunition,” but there are exceptions for those with a valid hunting license or permit, and those who were admitted for “lawful hunting or sporting purposes.”

An aerial photo of NAS Pensacola and its surrounds.

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An aerial photo of NAS Pensacola and its surrounds.
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Google Maps

NBC News cited sources that said the shooter had such a license and bought his weapon from a dealer in Pensacola.

The Washington Post also highlighted another ATF regulation allowing non-citizens to possess firearms if they’re from “a friendly foreign government entering the United States on official law enforcement business.”

US Defense Secretary Mark Esper said Saturday he could not confirm whether the attack was an act of terrorism, and that investigators needed to continue working to determine the motive.

Yet a number of disturbing details have come to light since the shooting, including that the gunman reportedly hosted a dinner party not long before the attack, in which the guests watched mass shooting videos.

The SITE Intel Group also conducted an analysis of what is believed to be the shooter’s Twitter page, which reportedly featured anti-American posts and echoed Osama Bin Laden.

A top Trump health appointee reportedly tried to get taxpayers to reimburse her for $47,000 in jewelry that got stolen from a rented SUV

  • A top Trump health appointee requested that taxpayers cover roughly $47,000 worth of jewelry and other luxury items that were stolen as she traveled for work, Politico reported.
  • Seema Verma, the Administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, reportedly had her luggage stolen from a rented SUV in July 2018 during a trip to San Francisco.
  • The items included $2,000 worth of clothes, a $325 moisturizer, $349 noise-cancelling headphones, and an Ivanka Trump-brand pendant valued at $5,900 and made of gold, prasiolite, and diamonds.
  • A spokesperson for the Department of Health and Human Services told Politico it was “perfectly appropriate” and not unusual for Verma to file such a claim for stolen property.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

President Donald Trump’s appointee to run the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services requested that taxpayers cover roughly $47,000 worth of jewelry and other items that were stolen from her while she traveled for work, Politico reported Saturday evening.

The appointee, Seema Verma, reportedly had her luggage stolen from a rented SUV in July 2018 during a trip to San Francisco, where she gave a speech.

Among the items Verma sought reimbursement for were some two dozen pieces of jewelry appraised at $43,065, $2,000 worth of clothes, a $325 moisturizer, $349 noise-cancelling headphones, and an Ivanka Trump-brand pendant valued at $5,900 and made of gold, prasiolite, and diamonds, according to Politico.

Verma reportedly wrote in her claim that none of the jewelry was insured, and that she had had the items appraised by a jeweler several weeks after the theft.

A spokesperson for the Department of Health and Human Services told Politico it was “perfectly appropriate” and not unusual for Verma to file such a claim for stolen property.

“When paying for such goods, the department pays a discounted rate based on age for the items that were lost,” the spokesperson said. “It’s perfectly appropriate that the administrator filed a personal property loss claim for goods stolen while on work travel and this is not an unusual practice for federal employees.”

Regardless, the department only reimbursed her $2,852.40 for the luxury items, the spokesperson told Politico.

Andy Ruiz Jr. says he lost his world titles to Anthony Joshua because he was undertrained, overweight, and partied for 3 months

Andy Ruiz Jr. failed to defend his world titles, losing them straight away to Anthony Joshua.

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Andy Ruiz Jr. failed to defend his world titles, losing them straight away to Anthony Joshua.
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Photo by Richard Heathcote/Getty Images

  • Andy Ruiz Jr. failed to defend his world heavyweight boxing titles, losing all the belts to Anthony Joshua in Diriyah, Saudi Arabia, on Saturday.
  • Ruiz Jr. blamed himself for defeat at the post-fight press conference.
  • He told the media he was undertrained, overweight, and partied for too many months following his upset win earlier in the year.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Andy Ruiz Jr. says he lost his world heavyweight titles to Anthony Joshua because he was undertrained, overweight, and partied for three months.

Ruiz Jr. shook up the boxing world when he dropped Joshua four times en route to a convincing, dominant, seventh round victory at Madison Square Garden in New York City in June.

However, the 30-year-old failed to defend the world titles he won from Joshua earlier this year, as he lost them straight away, being defeated by a lopsided 12-round decision in Diriyah, Saudi Arabia on Saturday, December 7.

“Me, my dad, and my team were talking … I should have listened to them,” Ruiz Jr. said at the post-fight press conference.

“I think we started [training] too late. Three months of partying, celebrating, affected me. What can I say.

“I shouldn’t have put on all this weight. I tried to do my kind of training on my own and I’m sorry to [trainer] Manny [Robles], my dad, I got too confident in myself.”

Ruiz Jr. recognized that he lost a wide decision to Joshua, but said he holds a victory, too. For Ruiz Jr. the scores are tied with one win apiece, and he wants a trilogy bout. “I know for the third one I’m going to be a lot better.”

He added: “There’s a lot of responsibility being a champion of the world. I think the partying and all that stuff got the best of me. Next time it’ll be a lot better.”

Read more:

A nervous Anthony Joshua exorcised his New York humiliation by outboxing Andy Ruiz Jr. to win his world titles back in style

If Anthony Joshua beats Andy Ruiz Jr. his promoter says he might raise his middle fingers to say ‘f— you’ to all his haters

Deontay Wilder says Anthony Joshua will keep avoiding him even if he beats Andy Ruiz Jr.

Saudi Arabia’s Andy Ruiz Jr. vs. Anthony Joshua fight is littered with athletes who have been busted for drug use

The $100 million Andy Ruiz vs. Anthony Joshua fight is ‘masking a darker truth’ in Saudi Arabia, and boxing is burying its head in the sand

Wladimir Klitschko says Anthony Joshua should never have lost to Andy Ruiz Jr. and expects him to dominate once again at heavyweight

Deontay Wilder says Andy Ruiz Jr. has Anthony Joshua’s weaknesses all figured out

Insiders are confident Anthony Joshua will beat Andy Ruiz Jr. in style the second time around despite 3 problems ahead of their first fight

Trump and his team are going out of their way to tell everyone how sorry Saudi Arabia is about the shooting at a Florida naval base

President Donald Trump delivers a speech during Arab-Islamic-American Summit in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia May 21, 2017.

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President Donald Trump delivers a speech during Arab-Islamic-American Summit in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia May 21, 2017.
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REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

  • A member of the Saudi military killed three people and injured seven others when he opened fire at Naval Air Station Pensacola Friday, authorities said.
  • In the wake of the shooting, President Donald Trump and other members of his administration have been repeatedly telling the public how “devastated” Saudi Arabia is about what happened.
  • Trump said Saturday that the Saudi leadership would somehow be involved in taking care of the families affected by the shooting.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A member of the Saudi military who was in the US for training opened fire at a naval base in Florida Friday. In the wake of the shooting that killed three people, the Trump administration has been repeatedly telling the public how sorry Saudi Arabia is about what happened.

The suspect, whom news outlets have identified as Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani, killed three and injured seven others at Naval Air Station Pensacola before he was killed by local law enforcement, authorities said.

The incident has the potential to stress the alliance between the US and Saudi Arabia, but the president and other members of his administration seem determined to prevent that.

After expressing his personal sympathies, President Donald Trump tweeted Friday afternoon that King of Saudi Arabia Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud had called the Trump to “express his sincere condolences.”

The suspect is said to have hosted a dinner party prior to the shooting where he and other Saudi students at the base watched mass shooting videos. Additionally, a Twitter page believed to belong to the suspect but that has since been suspended was reportedly filled with anti-American posts and Osama bin Laden quotes.

Speaking Saturday, Trump revealed that the Saudi Arabian leadership was “devastated” by the attack, adding that they will be involved in taking care of the families affected by the incident.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo also stepped in to highlight the feelings of his Saudi counterpart, Foreign Minister Al-Saud of Saudi Arabia.

In response to Pompeo’s tweet, Sen. Chris Murphy, a Connecticut Democrat, tweeted: “It’s unnerving how eager everyone in this Administration is to be PR agents for the Saudis.”

Secretary of Defense Mark Esper said Saturday that he was not prepared to call the shooting an act of terrorism, perhaps because authorities and investigators have yet to determine a motive. Esper further explained that the incident at NAS Pensacola would not affect his decision making on US troop deployments to Saudi Arabia.

“Saudi Arabia is a longstanding partner of ours in the region,” he said.

After the tragic shooting Friday, Esper said in a statement that he is “considering several steps to ensure the security of our military installations and the safety of our service members and their families.” On Saturday, he clarified that entails boosting base security and strengthening the vetting process.

Trump has also said that perhaps the US needs to take a look at how the American military trains foreign nationals in the US.