Monthly Archives: September 2019

Credit Suisse contractor who hired a spy to trail a former top banker is reportedly dead by suicide

Iqbal Khan, formerly the CEO of international wealth management at the Swiss bank Credit Suisse, at the Reuters Global Wealth Management Summit in Zurich in 2016.

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Iqbal Khan, formerly the CEO of international wealth management at the Swiss bank Credit Suisse, at the Reuters Global Wealth Management Summit in Zurich in 2016.
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Reuters

  • A lawyer representing the security business Investigo says the Credit Suisse contractor who hired the firm to investigate the former top executive Iqbal Khan is dead by suicide, according to a Bloomberg report on Monday.
  • The contractor hired investigators from Investigo to look into Khan, Credit Suisse’s former star banker, after Khan moved to cohead the wealth-management department of the rival bank UBS.
  • Credit Suisse worried Khan would persuade other employees to join him, according to Bloomberg. Khan is expected to begin working for UBS on Tuesday.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A lawyer representing the security business Investigo says the Credit Suisse contractor who hired the firm to investigate a former top executive is dead by suicide, according to a Bloomberg report on Monday.

The Credit Suisse contractor killed himself last Tuesday, Thomas Fingerhurth, a lawyer for Investigo, reportedly said. Inside Paradeplatz, a Swiss business blog, first reported on the death.

The contractor had hired Investigo investigators to look into Iqbal Khan after the star banker moved to cohead the wealth-management department of the rival bank UBS. Credit Suisse worried Khan would persuade other employees to join him, according to Bloomberg. Khan is expected to begin working for UBS on Tuesday.

Investigo was reportedly instructed to take photographs of Khan and identify people he met but advised not to get too close to him or break any laws.

Read more: A spy hired by Credit Suisse defends his role in a physical altercation with the ex-banker he was following

On September 17, Khan was said to have noticed he was being surveilled and approached an investigator in his car. Khan confronted the lone investigator and attempted to take photographs of him using a cellphone, Investigo said, according to Bloomberg. The investigator blocked the picture using his hands and went away.

But Khan reportedly said that he noticed three men following him and his wife who then attempted to take his phone away from him, leading to a physical altercation.

Swiss media reported that several people suspected of the pursuit were arrested after Khan filed a complaint.

In an internal memo, Credit Suisse said the media’s reporting of the confrontations were inaccurate and described it as “sensationalized,” Bloomberg reported. Investigo reportedly said in a memo to Credit Suisse that its employee acted alone and “defensively” in the encounter with Khan.

According to news reports, Khan and Credit Suisse CEO Tidjane Thiam had an argument during a house party in Zurich. Khan was overlooked for a promotion amid a Credit Suisse reorganization, prompting him to leave the firm five months later, Bloomberg reported.

Credit Suisse said it would support Thiam amid the internal investigation into the matter.

A New York police officer was killed by friendly fire when he wrestled with a suspect in the Bronx, police say

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Daniel Goodman / Business Insider

  • New York Police Officer Brian Mulkeen, who died in an exchange of gunfire on Sunday in the Bronx, was killed “tragic case of friendly fire,” Police Commissioner James P. O’Neill said during a news conference.
  • Mulkeen, 33, was shot twice by fellow officers, who accompanied him when approaching a suspect on probation, Antonio Lavance Williams, for questioning regarding a recent slew of shootings in the city.
  • Williams attempted to flee the officers, causing Mulkeen to wrestled the suspect to the ground, who was armed with a loaded, .32-caliber gun. Body cam footage captured Mulkeen repeating, “He’s reaching for it,” referring to the weapon, before the other officers discharged their weapons at both Mulkeen and Williams.
  • “Make no mistake – we lost the life of a courageous public servant solely due to a violent criminal who put the lives of the police, and all the people we serve, in jeopardy,” O’Neill said.
  • Visit Insider.com for more stories.

New York Police officer, who died in an exchange of gunfire on Sunday in the Bronx, was killed in “tragic case of friendly fire,” police said Monday.

Police Commissioner James P. O’Neill said during a press conference Monday that Officer Brian Mulkeen, 33, was shot twice by fellow officers in an anti-crime unit, who accompanied him when approaching a suspect on probation, Antonio Lavance Williams, for questioning regarding a slew of shootings in the city, The New York Times reported.

“This is an absolute tragedy that was caused by a convicted felon carrying an illegal, loaded firearm,” O’Neill said during the press conference.

Williams attempted to flee the officers, causing Mulkeen to wrestle the suspect to the ground, who was armed with a loaded, .32-caliber gun, according to The Times. Body cam footage captured Mulkeen repeating, “He’s reaching for it,” referring to the weapon before the other officers discharged their weapons at both Mulkeen and Williams.

An investigation of the incident revealed that Mulkeen’s firearm had been fired five times, and Williams’s gun had not been fired. Williams was pronounced dead at the scene, and Mulkeen was rushed to the hospital, where he died shortly after the incident.

Read more: New York city cop, suspect killed in exchange of gunfire

Mulkeen’s death is the second death of an NYPD officer by friendly fire reported this year, preceded by the death of Detective Brian Simonsen who was killed when confronting a robbery suspect in Queens.

“Make no mistake – we lost the life of a courageous public servant solely due to a violent criminal who put the lives of the police, and all the people we serve, in jeopardy,” O’Neill said.

Videos posted to social media showed police officers, first responders, and players from the New York Rangers paying their respect to the fallen officer as his remains were transported to a funeral home in Westchester, New York.

LISTEN: Employees inside Adam Neumann’s WeWork talk about the nonstop party to attain a $100 billion dream and the messy reality that tanked it

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Theo Wargo/Getty Images for iHeartMedia; Samantha Lee/Business Insider

  • Business Insider’s Julie Bort and Meghan Morris talked to 20 current and former WeWork employees, executives, and business partners about life inside one of the most controversial and fastest-growing startups of all time.
  • They described an atmosphere under the company’s cofounder and now-ousted CEO, Adam Neumann, in which boundaries between work and play did not exist.
  • Current and former employees recounted attending mandatory, alcohol-fueled company retreats where the sounds of coworkers having sex filled the air.
  • They also said they worked long hours in a chaotic atmosphere, fueled by Neumann’s manic push for growth and his inspirational “we are changing the world” speeches.
  • But behind the scenes, executives didn’t seem to practice what they preached in big and little ways, from honoring their own ban on meat to flying around the world on a $60 million private jet.
  • WeWork’s new co-CEOs are already trying to unroll the excesses of the company’s origins. Yet they have inherited a company whose roots were formed under the unique vision of Adam Neumann.
  • Click to listen to the article below, or subscribe to read it in full.

‘If you opt in, we will not leave you behind’ — PwC’s global chairman announces a $3 billion investment in job training

PwC global chairman Bob Moritz.

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PwC global chairman Bob Moritz.
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PwC

  • PwC, the professional services firm, announced Monday evening that global revenues were up 7%, its workforce increased by 25,000, and that it would be investing $3 billion over the next 3-4 years in job training.
  • PwC global chairman Bob Moritz told Business Insider that the “upskilling” investment would provide a competitive advantage as a recruitment tool.
  • Moritz said that he would be able to guarantee employment to employees who engage with the training, even if their roles are lost to automation.
  • This post is part of Business Insider’s ongoing series on Better Capitalism.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

PwC just had a year of what its global chairman Bob Moritz called record growth, and the professional services firm paired that announcement with news that it will be investing $3 billion into job training for all of its 275,000 employees over the next 3-4 years. That amounts to $3,636-$2,727 per employee annually, depending on the final timeline.

“We’ve got to be a talent magnet,” Moritz told Business Insider on Monday, and that’s why the investment, called “New World, New Skills,” will be at the forefront of recruitment pitches.

The noted the investment is larger than Amazon’s $700 million by 2025 for 100,000 employees, and Accenture’s $1 billion annually for 482,000 employees. Moritz cited a PwC study that found 30% of all jobs are at risk of being automated by the mid-2030s, and PwC’s workforce is subject to those forces, as much as anyone else. “I think it’s a necessity because the world’s moving so fast. You lose competitive edge and brand if you don’t.”

A large training announcement is intrinsically linked with the fear of job upheaval and loss, but Mortiz said that PwC was willing to make a bold agreement with PwC employees who engage with the upskilling initiative. “If you opt in, OK, we will not leave you behind. I can’t guarantee you the specific job that you have or want to have. But I can guarantee you you’re going to have employment here.”

The $3 billion will be split among four sections: the investment required for taking employees away from clients and putting them in classrooms, the further development of digital training tools, the deployment of employees to community projects that spread the same techniques, and leveraging existing partnerships with the United Nations and World Economic Forum to help adapt the training to each of their markets around the world.

Moritz, who has been with PwC for 24 years and previously served as the US chair before taking the global role in July 2016, said the discussion for adapting its workforce for a rapidly changing environment began about five years ago. That led to upskilling efforts in different sectors a couple of years ago, and within the past year, it became clear it needed to become a global initiative.

Large firms across industries have been investing in job retraining as automation eliminates jobs, in what the WEF has popularly dubbed “the Fourth Industrial Revolution.” Accenture and IBM are two such companies that similarly have developed proprietary software allowing workers to track their skills and adjust as needed by undergoing training, often in their free team, through on-demand lessons.

PwC created the role of chief digital officer in October 2017 for Joe Atkinson to oversee the development of its digital training portals and apps. This past May, Atkinson told us that PwC’s US chair, Tim Ryan, gave employees the same guarantee Moritz said.

“It was probably even more powerful than we thought it was going to be because it reflects the stress and strain, and to some extent the fear, that people have that whatever they do today is going to be replaced by some technology in the future,” Atkinson said. The idea then, is that there is enough foresight to determine which new primary skills PwC’s employees across all of its businesses, and it’s worth equipping them appropriately. “So that’s where we started.”

These $390 waterproof hunting boots stood up to mountain passes and mucky swamps — here’s why they are worth the price

After miles of navigating mushy meadows and craggy ridges, these kicks may have been a little gritty looking, but my toes were still bone-dry and ready for more.

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After miles of navigating mushy meadows and craggy ridges, these kicks may have been a little gritty looking, but my toes were still bone-dry and ready for more.
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Owen Burke/Business Insider

Filson and Danner are two of the longest-living titans within the outdoors industry in the United States, and between the two brands is a legacy of about 200 years of research, innovation, and design. It’s all well and good if you haven’t heard of them, but whether you recreate or travail by earth, asphalt, or some combination thereof, investing in a pair of boots like these would serve you – indefinitely – well.

After almost a year of running around the Northeast of the US in Filson x Danner’s Grouse boots, I took them hiking, hunting, and fishing through every condition Wyoming had to offer during a particularly tempestuous late summer week, and here’s how they held up.

Specs, waterproofing, and timeless technology

Later that very same day, we hiked up a stream, still without a trace of water seeping through the leather and tin cloth uppers.

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Later that very same day, we hiked up a stream, still without a trace of water seeping through the leather and tin cloth uppers.
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Owen Burke/Business Insider

Full-grain leather and cotton oil finish tin cloth uppers, Vibram Olympia outsoles, and a Gore-Tex inner lining make these boots fit for all. And a stitchdown welt means these things aren’t just heavy-duty; they can be resoled. For further reading on what that means, here’s a great explainer on different outsole stitching methods.

Inside that welted sole is a fiberglass shank, which is lighter than steel but not quite as light as Kevlar, that stiffens the outsoles in the same way steel would. Kevlar would be nicer for weight, but you’d be paying a premium to get it.

An 8-inch height with lace-to-toe design means you and your ankles will remain secure in your boots, and you’ll also be able to get plenty deep in streams (or bogs or swamps) before taking water in over the top.

As a sidenote, these fit a bit narrow. If you have a broader foot you might consider going with Danner’s regular edition Grouse Boots, which come in brown as opposed to this year’s camo, and are available with a wide sole option.

Field notes

That is until we forded the river.

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That is until we forded the river.
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Owen Burke/Business Insider

On the subject of streams: Yes, we did water-test them in chilly mountain streams. And while the outsoles and welting stood up to the test, we flooded them to see how the Gore-Tex inner linings held up.

A beautiful Wyoming cutthroat trout, off to swim another day.

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A beautiful Wyoming cutthroat trout, off to swim another day.
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Owen Burke/Business Insider

We spent about two hours hiking up a river whose name shan’t be spoken. But for the sake of this review, we went waist-deep to cross it so we could access what appeared (and proved) to be a largely untouched hole filled with remarkably healthy cutthroat trout. After a few hours of taking turns tangling with them, we made our way back across the river, up the canyon, and back into the car.

Proof we actually went in. When in grizzly country, always bring your bear spray.

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Proof we actually went in. When in grizzly country, always bring your bear spray.
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Owen Burke/Business Insider

And then off to another stream, just to make sure these puppies were properly soaked. Or maybe we wanted to change it up with a few brown trout. Whatever you choose to believe, we drenched these boots.

They were a little slippery on smooth, wet cobblestones, but no worse than any other boot shy of felt (which you wouldn’t want on a hiking or hunting boot anyhow), and the outsoles, no matter what I put them through, seemed to remain clog-free in everything from mud to gravel.

After finally leaving the river, while my feet were wet, I never felt too uncomfortable (admittedly, wool socks help), nor did I incur a single blister. Chalk that up to Danner’s patented air-cushioned microfiber-lined polyurethane soles.

And lastly, it came time to see how those boots dried. It took about 12 hours on the boot warmers, but by then the insoles were dry and showed no sign of having ever been wet at all (I seem to have forgotten to photograph them, but will try to update with an “after” picture soon). Now, were you to wet wade in these things and soak them day in, day out, you’d probably start to wear away at the Gore-Tex lining, but then that’s what wading boots and waders are for, and wouldn’t you know it, Danner makes those, too.

Final thoughts

The Filson x Danner Grouse Boots after many a mile, though by looking at them you wouldn't quite know it.

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The Filson x Danner Grouse Boots after many a mile, though by looking at them you wouldn’t quite know it.
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Owen Burke/Business Insider

These boots aren’t only resilient, they’re also comfy. As I mentioned before, no blisters, no tenderness, and no sore feet by any measure. I’d like to see a slightly less rigid tongue, but that’ll wear in over time. If you need a winter, spring, summer, or fall boot that’ll outstand the test of time, road grit, salt, and yes, a rogue Uber driver’s fender, look no further. Oil and wax as needed, but these things are good to go out of the box.

Pros: Sturdy with a classic look that can be worn on the hunt or casually, highly water-resistant, lightweight

Cons: Tongues are a little tough (though there’s a leather insert to help with that); not the best on smooth, wet rock; only come in camo this year; narrow soles (but Danner’s regular version offers a wide-soled option)

Buy Filson x Danner Grouse Boots at Filson for $395

Buy Danner’s regular edition Grouse Boots (which are nearly the same product) at Amazon for $329.95

Deshaun Watson gave a peek at how much goes on inside a quarterback’s mind during games

Deshaun Watson broke down the Panthers defense during his postgame press conference, and he explained why he and the Texans struggled to break it.

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Deshaun Watson broke down the Panthers defense during his postgame press conference, and he explained why he and the Texans struggled to break it.
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Troy Taormina-USA TODAY Sports

  • Deshaun Watson and the Houston Texans struggled against the Carolina Panthers during Sunday’s 16-10 loss.
  • After the game, a reporter asked Watson what the offense could have done to get off more big plays against the Panthers defense.
  • Rather than deflect, Watson gave a detailed answer, explaining that the Panthers’ Cover 4 defense made it difficult for the Texans receivers to get open deep, forcing the team to use double-moves to get them open.
  • Watson’s strategic breakdown gave football fans a look inside the mind of an NFL quarterback as he sees the field.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Deshaun Watson and the Houston Texans had a rough outing Sunday, losing to the Carolina Panthers 16-10 and moving to 2-2 on the young season.

After the game, Watson was asked what more the team could have done to beat the Panthers’ defensive coverage on more big plays, and he wound up offering one of the more insightful answers you’ll hear all year.

“Do you know what kind of coverage they were playing?” Watson asked the reporter Aaron Reiss, who covers the Texans for The Athletic, in response. “I’m just asking.”

Read more: Top 13 waiver-wire pickups for Week 5 of fantasy football

Watson then began his breakdown, explaining that the Panthers’ Cover 4 defense made it so that the only opportunities for the Texans to go deep was on double-moves from their receivers. Watson acknowledged missing a few throws but illustrated just how difficult it was to successfully break through the coverage.

Some on Twitter believed that Watson was attempting to put Reiss on blast with his response, but Reiss was quick to thank Watson for the thoughtful and detailed answer.

More than anything, Watson’s response drew a stark contrast with the cookie-cutter nature of many postgame press conferences and the act of televised football analysis in general.

Between pregame shows, halftime reports, and player interviews, football fans will hear NFL-isms tossed around countless times every Sunday. Whether a generally vague answer from a player such as “We’ve got to get better for next week,” or a bit of analysis from halftime hosts that insists a player needs to “get his head in the game,” plenty of airtime is filled with commentary that takes up space while not saying much.

Rather than take that route, Watson offered a look into the mind of an NFL quarterback as he sees the field and calculates what needs to be done to beat the defense that’s trying to stop him.

  • Read more:

Bills defender accuses NFL of double standard over Tom Brady after vicious hit on Josh Allen

Top 13 waiver-wire pickups for Week 5 of fantasy football

Adam Thielen offered a blunt analysis of another ugly Kirk Cousins performance as things reach a boiling point with the Vikings

Raiders’ Vontaze Burfict suspended for the season after being ejected for a helmet-to-helmet hit

A viral video remixed Greta Thunberg’s UN speech as Swedish death metal. She said she’ll ‘be doing death metal only’ from now on.

Swedish environmental activist Greta Thunberg during the Climate Action Summit.

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Swedish environmental activist Greta Thunberg during the Climate Action Summit.
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Carlo Allegri/Reuters

Greta Thunberg’s speech at the UN Climate Action Summit was pretty hardcore, and a video that went viral over the weekend has since given it a fitting soundtrack.

The 16-year-old Swedish activist kicked off the summit with an impassioned and emotional speech to the UN General Assembly in which she chastised world leaders for failing to take action to slow the effects of climate change.

“This is all wrong. I shouldn’t be standing here. I should be back in school on the other side of the ocean,” Thunberg said with tears in her eyes. “Yet you all come to me for hope? How dare you. You have stolen my dreams and my childhood with your empty words.”

When the New York City-based thrash-metal drummer John Meredith heard Thunberg’s words, he knew exactly what he wanted to do.

“I was very impressed by her passion and outrage,” Meredith, who calls himself John Mollusk online and performs in a band called Suaka, told Rolling Stone. “And the words she chose just evoked the darkness of the metal music I love: Entombed, Gojira, At the Gates, Sepultura.”

Meredith improvised some death-metal instrumentals to accompany Thunberg’s speech, according to Rolling Stone. Since her voice didn’t sound “metal enough,” he sang along in his own growl.

The resulting video, which Meredith posted on YouTube on September 25, has been viewed over 3.1 million times.

“I guess I didn’t really have a specific intent other than to turn her brutal words into a metal song,” Meredith told Rolling Stone.

He acknowledged that the music added humor to a speech about a serious and urgent topic.

“Teen angst can be a powerful and important driving force in society, for instance the Arab spring,” he said. “But there is an element of satire and levity regarding the tone and the music. I mean, I have never sung like that before in my life. I think humor and [positive mental attitude] can be at least as powerful as anger and outrage, and there is a place for both.”

Thunberg seemed to accept the humorous take on her speech and weighed in on the video in a Twitter post: “I have moved on from this climate thing… From now on I will be doing death metal only!!” she wrote.

While Thunberg was, of course, joking about that career change, Meredith’s video is really leading him to pursue some new projects.

“Even before the video went viral, my friends were suggesting other speeches to do,” Meredith said. “I had so much fun doing this one, I will probably do more.”

How to keep your Mac computer from sleeping, or schedule specific times for it to sleep

It's possible to keep your Mac from sleeping by using its Energy Saver features.

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It’s possible to keep your Mac from sleeping by using its Energy Saver features.
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Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

Your Mac’s sleep and Energy Saver functions are invaluable, especially if you’re using a laptop and most especially if you’re running on battery power.

But whether you’re using a desktop or a laptop, it’s useful to know how to manage your Mac’s energy settings, lest you find yourself frustrated when your computer’s Wi-Fi goes off in the middle of downloading a favorite TV show from iTunes because your Mac went to sleep. (Something that has definitely never happened to this writer before.)

Here’s a quick guide to managing your Mac’s sleep settings as well as scheduling your computer’s sleep and wake times.

Check out the products mentioned in this article:

MacBook Pro (From $1,299.99 at Best Buy)

How to use Energy Saver preferences to keep your Mac from sleeping

1. Open System Preferences by navigating to the Apple icon in the top left menu, selecting the System Preferences icon in your Dock, or by typing “System Preferences” into Spotlight search.

2. Open Energy Saver by clicking the light bulb icon in System Preferences.

Click on Energy Saver.

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Click on Energy Saver.
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Christopher Curley/Business Insider

3. From here, you’ll see two sets of settings: One for the Power Adapter (for when your computer is plugged in) and the other for the Battery. Both have the same slider allowing you to set sleep times from anywhere between one minute to three hours or simply “Never.”

Toggle between the Battery and Power Adapter settings and slide the

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Toggle between the Battery and Power Adapter settings and slide the “Turn display off after” bar to your desired setting.
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Christopher Curley/Business Insider

4. If you want to keep your Mac from sleeping, period, select “Never” on both the Power Adapter and Battery screens.

5. You’ll also want to select “Prevent computer from sleeping automatically when display is turned off” if you’re the kind of person who likes to turn down the brightness on their screen when not using it but doesn’t necessarily want the computer going into sleep mode.

How to use other sleep settings on a Mac

So that’s how to turn display sleep off. But there are a few other options in the Energy Saver menu settings that you should know about.

“Put hard disks to sleep when possible”

Select

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Select “Put hard disks to sleep when possible.”
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Christopher Curley/Business Insider

If you have a hard disk on your Mac, checking this spins down your hard drive at the earliest possible convenience to save power. This also means that if your Mac has been inactive it could take a minute to get going again as the disk spins up.

Note: This option only applies to Macs that have spinning hard drives and not solid state drives (SSDs). Since SSDs are solid state, there’s nothing to “spin down” in the first place.

“Enable Power Nap while on battery power”

Select

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Select “Enable Power Nap while on battery power” from the Battery tab.
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Christopher Curley/Business Insider

If you don’t want to keep the computer fully “awake,” this setting will allow the computer to periodically wake up and perform tasks like checking email and looking for software updates. A handy compromise.

“Wake for Wi-Fi network access”

Select

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Select “Wake for Wi-Fi network access” from the Power Adapter tab.
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Christopher Curley/Business Insider

This setting wakes the computer when someone wants to access file sharing on it – say if you have a household shared iTunes library.

How to schedule sleep on your Mac

Finally, macOS X also allows you to schedule your computer’s sleep cycles. Here’s how.

1. Select “Schedule” in the bottom right corner of our Energy Saver System Preferences pane.

Click the

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Click the “Schedule…” button on the Energy Saver window.
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Christopher Curley/Business Insider

2. Check the two checkboxes and set a wake up time.

Set sleep and wake times.

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Set sleep and wake times.
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Christopher Curley/Business Insider

3. Do the same with selecting a sleep time.

Note that you can also select the frequency at which your Mac follows your sleep/wake schedules, from specific days to every day – or just on weekends.

Related coverage from How To Do Everything: Tech:

The billionaire cofounder of Shopify says he intentionally slowed the company’s growth — and it was the key to managing the ‘crushing’ stress of being a CEO

Shopify founder and CEO Tobias Lütke opened up about handling his stress on an episode of NPR's

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Shopify founder and CEO Tobias Lütke opened up about handling his stress on an episode of NPR’s “How I Built This with Guy Raz” in August.
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REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Shopify CEO and cofounder Tobias Lütke has one word to describe the responsibility of being a chief executive: “crushing.”

During the company’s early years, Lütke was so stressed about having enough money to meet payroll and worried about losing the money family members had invested into the company that he often struggled to sleep at night, he said on an episode of NPR’s “How I Built This with Guy Raz” in August.

“One thing I found about the entrepreneur journey, or at least mine, is that you basically exist in two different states,” Lütke, who launched Shopify with his cofounders in 2006, told NPR. “There’s the state of ‘things are coming together, and I think if we do this we’re unbeatable.’ And [there’s] the state of complete dread and ‘we’re dead, we’re dead, we’re dead tonight.'”

To deal with it, Lütke intentionally prevented the e-commerce platform from growing as quickly as it could have between 2009 and 2010, he told NPR.

“If you come from [an] engineering [background], you know that something’s always a bottleneck, and then the moment you remove that, something else becomes a bottleneck – and the same goes for companies,” Lütke told NPR. “At this point, I intentionally slowed down the growth of the company a little bit just because I needed it to be manageable for me.”

Read more: Tobias Lütke, the billionaire founder of Shopify, says the key to building a ‘fantastic relationship’ with investors was being totally upfront about what he did not know

Lütke says he also wrote computer programs – a longtime hobby of his – and confided in his wife, Fiona, to relieve his stress.

Many successful CEOs rely on a hobby to help relieve the stress of running a business, as Business Insider has previously reported. Former Microsoft CEO Bill Gates likes to read before bed, while Berkshire Hathaway CEO Warren Buffett plays the ukulele. Twitter cofounder and CEO Jack Dorsey runs six miles a day and sets aside a specific day to tackle each part of his massive business.

“The bottoms are deep, and the implications of what failure means – it just means so much,” Lütke told NPR. “It can change everyone’s life story to a significant degree.”

For Lütke, Shopify’s success has already paid off: Forbes puts his current net worth at $2.7 billion.

The Ukrainian orphan accused of being an adult was found living with another family in Indiana

Natalia and the couple the Daily Mail identified as the couple she's living with, Antwon and Cynthia Mans.

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Natalia and the couple the Daily Mail identified as the couple she’s living with, Antwon and Cynthia Mans.
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Facebook

  • Natalia, the orphan at the center of an adoption scandal, has been the subject of shocking allegations and multiple questions about her age from her adoptive parents.
  • Natalia, who was born in Ukraine, was left in Indiana in 2013 when her adoptive family moved to Canada. The family has since alleged that not only was she terrifying and dangerous, but that she was actually in her 20s.
  • As charges against her adoptive parents make their way to court, Natalia has reportedly been living with another family in Indiana.
  • A family friend told the Daily Mail last week that Natalia was “in a really awkward position” and that things like schooling had been complicated by the drama from her adoptive parents.
  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Amid the controversy and mixed accounts surrounding Natalia, the Ukrainian orphan at the center of an adoption scandal, she has reportedly been living with a Christian family in the same state where she was left by a family who moved to Canada.

The Daily Mail reported last week that Natalia was living with Antwon Mans, 36, a recently ordained pastor, and his wife, Cynthia, 39. Natalia’s adoptive parents, Kristine and Michael Barnett, have said she is actually a 20-something woman with a short stature as a result of a condition called spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita, Insider previously reported.

The Barnetts adopted Natalia in 2010, when she was believed to be as young as 6 years old, according to reports from Fox 59 and the Daily Mail.

The Barnetts legally changed Natalia’s age to 22 in 2012, and the next year they left her in Indiana while they moved to Canada, where their son, a child prodigy with mild autism, would pursue a graduate degree in physics, the Lafayette Journal & Courier reported, citing an affidavit.

The bizarre story first made headlines last month when a five-year investigation concluded and authorities charged the Barnetts with neglect of a dependent.

Kristine and Michael Barnett.

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Kristine and Michael Barnett.
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Tippecanoe County Jail

Court documents seen by WISH-TV, an Indianapolis CW affiliate, indicated that Natalia’s age was changed to 22 from 8 in 2012, the same year a scan at Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital concluded she was 11.

But other documents, including an Indiana University Health report from 2016, appear to indicate that Natalia is an adult. The report, which is unverified, said that she “has made a career of perpetuating her age facade.”

Read more: Parents who are accused of abandoning an 8-year-old Ukrainian girl they adopted say she was actually a 22-year-old mentally disturbed adult

“Natalia was a woman,” Kristine Barnett told the Daily Mail last week. “She had periods. She had adult teeth. She never grew a single inch, which would happen even with a child with dwarfism. The doctors all confirmed she was suffering a severe psychological illness only diagnosed in adults.”

Though it’s unclear whether Antwon and Cynthia Mans took over Natalia’s care in 2013, they officially moved to become her legal guardians in 2016 but later withdrew their petition after the court upheld a ruling that she was born in 1989 and not 2003, according to the Daily Mail.

Pictures posted on Facebook and published by the Daily Mail portray the family as close-knit and welcoming of Natalia. A family friend told the Daily Mail that the Manses “already tried to speak to Natalia’s adopted parents and tried to go through the courts” but were “just not getting anywhere and now this is escalating.”

“She is just in a really awkward position and they are trying to help her out,” the friend told the Daily Mail. “There’s actually very limited things they can do for her because people are saying she’s 30. She can’t even go to high school.”

The family’s cozy appearance on social media stands in sharp contrast to Barnett’s accusations that Natalia was a terrifying and dangerous presence who tried to stab her family members while they were sleeping, once tried to push her toward an electric fence, and tried to poison her coffee.

The Manses did not immediately reply to Insider’s request for comment.