Monthly Archives: December 2019

How to change your relationship status on Facebook, and adjust who can see it

You can change your relationship status on Facebook and adjust who can see it all in a few steps.

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You can change your relationship status on Facebook and adjust who can see it all in a few steps.
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Shutterstock

  • If you want to change your relationship status on Facebook, it can be a bit complicated, as it’s one of those features buried in the many other options that you have for customizing your profile.
  • However, if you know where to go on your profile to change your relationship status, you can easily make changes to it and adjust who can see it.
  • Here’s what you’ll need to do to update your relationship status on Facebook.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Facebook gives you so many options to customize your profile, in fact there are so many that it can feel a bit overwhelming at times, especially if you’re starting from scratch.

Regardless of how long you’ve had your profile, one of the updates you’ll want to change right away is your relationship status.

Here’s how to navigate through your profile and make that change.

How to change your relationship status on Facebook

1. Go to facebook.com and log into your account, if needed.

2. Click your name in the top toolbar to get to your profile.

3. Click the “Edit Profile” button at the top of your profile.

Click

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Click “Edit Profile.”
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Devon Delfino/Business Insider

4. Scroll down to the “Relationship” section and click the pencil icon next to your current relationship status.

Click the pencil icon.

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Click the pencil icon.
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Devon Delfino/Business Insider

5. Select “Edit,” next to your current relationship status, again.

Click

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Click “Edit” again.
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Devon Delfino/Business Insider

6. Click into the dropdown menu and choose your desired status.

Select your relationship status.

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Select your relationship status.
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Devon Delfino/Business Insider

7. Enter additional information, if desired.

You can also select who can see your updated status.

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You can also select who can see your updated status.
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Devon Delfino/Business Insider

8. Change who can view your status update in the dropdown next to “Save Changes,” then click “Save Changes” to update your status.

Related coverage from How To Do Everything: Tech:

‘How much does Cash App charge?’: Many Cash App transactions are free — here’s how to tell which will cost you

Many transactions are free on the Cash app, but there are some transactions that include a minimal extra fee.

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Many transactions are free on the Cash app, but there are some transactions that include a minimal extra fee.
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Square

  • Many Cash App transactions between users are free, but there are instances in which you may be charged a small fee for a transaction.
  • When you make a payment using a credit card on Cash App, Square adds a 3% fee to the transaction.
  • Standard transfers on the app to your bank account take two to three days and are free, while instant transfers include a 1.5% fee.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

If you use a personal Cash App account linked to your bank account or debit card and aren’t in a rush to transfer payments, then you might never have to pay a single cent for your transactions. However, if you opt to use a credit card to send money or need an instant transfer, Cash App charges minimal fees.

There are a few cases in which you might incur Cash App charges, but with the included convenience of sending, receiving, and transferring money, you probably won’t even mind paying up.

Here’s when your Cash App will charge you a fee

If you are sending money via a credit card linked to your Cash App, a 3% fee will be added to the total. So sending someone $100 will actually cost you $103. This is a rather standard fee with other payment apps as well, like PayPal, and is about the same rate businesses usually absorb with credit card transactions.

Cash App accepts major credit cards, including Discover, MasterCard, Visa, and American Express.

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Cash App accepts major credit cards, including Discover, MasterCard, Visa, and American Express.
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Steven John/Business Insider

The other common charge Cash App users will see is a 1.5% commission added when they opt for instant transfers from the app to a bank account. However, this fee can easily be avoided by simply opting for a standard transfer, which takes two to three days.

You must have a valid debit card linked to your bank account to set up a Cash App account.

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You must have a valid debit card linked to your bank account to set up a Cash App account.
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Steven John/Business Insider

Related coverage from How To Do Everything: Tech:

Trump’s biggest accomplishments and failures as president as he heads into a reelection year after impeachment

  • President Donald Trump has been among the most controversial presidents in US history, and just the third commander-in-chief to be impeached.
  • Trump is unlikely to be removed from office in a Senate trial after being impeached on December 18, and still has a decent shot at reelection as things currently stand.
  • With that said, Trump will primarily have to lean on his record as president while seeking to convince Americans he deserves a second term.
  • Though his accomplishments might not be popular with his critics, Trump for better or worse has been a consequential president thus far.
  • At the same time, Trump’s tenure has seen major failures that have exacerbated problems at home and abroad.
  • Visit BusinessInsider.com for more stories.

President Donald Trump is heading into an election year as just the third commander-in-chief in US history to be impeached.

Trump is highly unlikely to be removed from office via a trial in the GOP-controlled Senate in the new year, however, and he still has a decent shot of being reelected next November.

Though he’s been perhaps the most controversial and divisive president in modern US history, Trump has had a remarkably steady approval rating due to his staunchly loyal supporters.

Trump’s impeachment seems unlikely to sway voters one way or another, though the president has already shown that he’ll use it to rile up his supporters along the campaign trail.

With that said, Trump will primarily have to lean on his record as president while seeking to convince Americans he deserves a second term.

Trump has a troubled relationship with the truth and facts, and a documented record of embellishing his accomplishments. Since entering the White House, Trump has made at least 15,413 false or misleading claims, according to an analysis from The Washington Post. Virtually all politicians bend the truth, but Trump has excelled in this regard.

The president, for example, has taken full credit for steady economic growth that began under the Obama administration. Trump has also repeatedly and wrongly claimed that he’s fostered the “greatest economy” in US history.

Here are Trump’s biggest accomplishments and failures as president so far, measured by their overall impact and taking into account the general response from Congress, the public, and wider world.


Accomplishment: Reshaping the federal judiciary

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Police officers stand in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, DC, U.S., January 19, 2018.
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Eric Thayer/Reuters

Trump’s most lasting impact on the country will be the reshaping of the federal judiciary.

Thus far, Trump has installed two Supreme Court justices and 187 judges to the federal bench – all for lifetime appointments.

Trump nominees now make up roughly 25% of all US circuit court judges, according to an analysis by The Washington Post.

He’s appointed 50 judges on the 13 US circuit courts – and still has roughly a year left in his first term. To put this into perspective, former President Barack Obama appointed 55 circuit judges in his two terms in the White House.

The courts get the final say in US politics, setting precedents that can shape the country for years to come.

Even if Trump is not reelected in 2020, his presidency will continue to have an impact on the direction of the US due to the sheer number of conservative federal judges he’s installed.


Accomplishment: Space Force

In signing a $738 billion defense spending bill just a few days before Christmas, Trump officially established the sixth branch of the US Armed Forces – the Space Force.

The Space Force is the first new military service since the US Air Force was created in 1947.

Despite its name, the new branch has not been established to protect the planet from potential extraterrestrial threats, but is tasked with protecting the US military’s assets in space.

“This is not a farce. This is nationally critical,” Gen. John Raymond, who Trump tapped to lead the Space Force, told reporters earlier this month. “We are elevating space commensurate with its importance to our national security and the security of our allies and partners.”

Many of the details surrounding the Space Force must still be ironed out. In many ways, the new branch is simply a more centralized version of military missions in space that already existed from the Air Force, Army and Navy.

Todd Harrison, who directs the Aerospace Security Project at the Center for Strategic & International Studies, recently told NPR: “It will create a centralized, unified chain of command that is responsible for space, because ultimately when responsibility is fragmented, no one’s responsible.”


Accomplishment: Tax reform

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U.S. President Donald Trump celebrates with Congressional Republicans after the U.S. Congress passed sweeping tax overhaul legislation, on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington.
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Reuters/Carlos Barria

Three years into his presidency, Trump’s signature legislative achievement remains a Republican tax bill that made sweeping changes to the tax code – the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.

As Business Insider’s Joseph Zeballos-Roig recently reported:

  • The law was the biggest overhaul to the nation’s tax code in three decades, and the president pitched it as “rocket fuel” for the American economy.
  • It permanently slashed the corporate tax rate to 21% from 35% while also providing temporary benefits for individuals and their families.
  • Critics argued it was a windfall for massive corporations at the expense of the middle class. Meanwhile, supporters of the tax cuts contended it would unleash an economic bonanza. Businesses would invest in their operations, they said, resulting in improved worker productivity and higher wages.
  • Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin, among others, said the law would juice the nation’s gross domestic product to 3% (or more, as Trump said 6%) and soon pay for itself and spread prosperity.
  • But the law has achieved none of the ambitious goals that Republicans put forward – and there are scant signs they ever will.


Accomplishment: First Step Act

Trump signed the First Step Act into law in December 2018, marking the first legislative victory in years for advocates seeking to reform the criminal justice system.

The bill passed with overwhelming bipartisan support in Congress. It offers relatively modest changes to the federal prison system, but was praised as an important step forward by groups and activists seeking to end mass incarceration.

Business Insider’s Michelle Mark summarized the key aspects of the legislation after it passed in the Senate last year:

  • The passage of the bill…marked the first major legislative win in decades to address mass incarceration at the federal level.
  • The bill overhauls certain federal sentencing laws, reducing mandatory minimum sentences for drug felonies and expanding early-release programs.
  • The bill also makes retroactive a 2010 federal sentencing law reducing the sentencing disparity between crack and powder cocaine offenses.
  • The bill also aims to lower recidivism by offering more rehabilitation and job-training opportunities, and it includes provisions intended to treat prisoners humanely – banning the shackling of pregnant inmates, halting the use of solitary confinement for most juvenile inmates, and mandating that prisoners be placed in facilities within 500 miles from their families.

Accomplishment: Defeating ISIS’s caliphate and taking out Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi

ISIS shocked the world in 2014 when it took over a large swath of territory across Iraq and Syria and declared a caliphate.

The terrorist group’s territorial holdings were the basis for its so-called caliphate, and provided it will a major base of operations to conduct attacks across the world.

After a five-year effort led by the US, ISIS’s caliphate was finally defeated in March 2019.

Trump has at times falsely claimed that ISIS is totally defeated, embellishing the extent of the US military’s success against the terrorist organization during his presidency. Though the terrorist group has lost its territory – its so-called caliphate – it’s still estimated to have up to 18,000 fighters in Iraq and Syria.

In late October, a US raid led to the death of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi.

Baghdadi was the world’s most wanted terrorist up to that point and his death represented a major blow to the terrorist group.

“Last night, the United States brought the world’s No. 1 terrorist leader to justice,” Trump said at the time. “Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi is dead.”

“Capturing or killing him has been the top national security priority of my administration,” he added.


Failure: Charlottesville

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Alt-right members preparing to enter Emancipation Park holding Nazi, Confederate, and Gadsden “Don’t Tread on Me” flags.
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Anthony Crider/Wikimedia Commons

Trump’s response to a deadly neo-Nazi rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, remains one of the most controversial moments in his presidency.

It was emblematic of Trump’s struggle to bring the country together after tragedies, and more generally. His response also typified his controversial record on race relations and white supremacy.

Trump blamed “many sides” for the violence at the rally, which resulted in the death of a counterprotester, Heather Heyer. He later said there were “very fine people on both sides.”

The president was excoriated by Republicans and Democrats alike over his response and his failure to offer a swift and forceful condemnation of white supremacist violence.

GOP Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, often one of Trump’s fiercest defenders in Congress, at the time said the president’s words were “dividing Americans, not healing them.”

“President Trump took a step backward by again suggesting there is moral equivalency between the white supremacist, neo-Nazis and KKK members,” Graham added.


Failure: America’s global image is in shambles

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France’s President Emmanuel Macron and Germany’s Chancellor Angela Merkel look at U.S. President Donald Trump during a family photo opportunity at the NATO leaders summit in Watford, Britain December 4, 2019..JPG
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Reuters

America’s global image has declined significantly under Trump, who has repeatedly insulted key US allies while cozying up to dictators.

As Insider reported in March:

  • Confidence in US leadership declined significantly between 2016 and 2017, according to a new report from the Institute for Economics and Peace (IEP).
  • The report found people on average now have more confidence in Chinese leadership than in US leadership.
  • Steve Killelea, the founder and executive chairman of IEP, told Insider that global confidence in US leadership experienced a “precipitous drop” after Trump’s election.
  • Killelea pointed to the “poor press” Trump has received internationally, while noting that global confidence in the US was much higher under former President Barack Obama.
  • Global confidence in US leadership fell 11.2 percentage points from 2016 to 2017, according to the report.

The president’s tendency to push important allies away and isolate the US, including by pulling out of landmark international agreements like the Paris climate accord, has had a palpable impact.

According to a recent YouGov survey reported by Deutsche Welle (DW), for example, found 41% of Germans view Trump as more dangerous than North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, Russian President Vladimir Putin, Chinese President Xi Jinping, and Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.


Failure: Family separations and the deaths of migrant children

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An activist holds up a sign that says “families belong together” outside of the Homestead migrant child detention facility in Homestead, Florida.
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John Haltiwanger/INSIDER

Trump in 2016 campaigned on reducing undocumented immigration, pledging to take a hardline approach.

He made good on that promise when coming into office, but has been accused of human rights abuses and violating international law by the UN.

The Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” policy on illegal border crossings led to the separations of at least 5,500 families and saw children placed in cages.

The president of the American Academy of Pediatrics at the time described the practice as “nothing less than government-sanctioned child abuse.”

After widespread backlash, Trump issued an executive order in June 2018 to halt the family separations, and a federal judge ordered the Trump administration to reunite all those it had separated. But the fallout from the separations is ongoing.

Trump has falsely blamed his predecessor, former President Barack Obama, for the policy that saw thousands of children separated from their parents.

Meanwhile, at least six migrant children have died in US custody since September 2018, leading to widespread condemnation of conditions in detention facilities.

The UN human rights chief, Michelle Bachelet, in July said she was “shocked” by the US government’s treatment of migrant children and the conditions they faced in detention facilities after crossing the border from Mexico.

“As a pediatrician, but also as a mother and a former head of state, I am deeply shocked that children are forced to sleep on the floor in overcrowded facilities, without access to adequate health care or food, and with poor sanitation conditions,” Bachelet, the former president of Chile, stated.


Failure: Iran and Syria

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Michael Gruber/Getty Images; Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images; Samantha Lee/Business Insider

Trump’s decision to unilaterally withdraw the US from the 2015 nuclear deal in May 2018 has induced chaos throughout the Middle East.

It remains one of Trump’s most unpopular decisions in the global arena, and has been condemned by top US allies who were also signatories to the deal.

The president has failed to thwart Iran’s aggressive behavior in the region via a maximum pressure campaign, which is meant to squeeze Tehran into negotiating a more stringent version of the pact.

After a series of incidents in the Persian Gulf region over the summer, tensions between Washington and Tehran reached historic heights and sparked fears of war.

At the same time, Iran has begun to take steps away from the crumbling 2015 nuclear deal, which was designed to prevent it from obtaining a nuclear weapon. Meanwhile, on the final day of 2019, the US embassy in Baghdad was attacked by supporters of an Iran-backed military in Iraq.

Trump’s decision to pull US troops out of northern Syria in October is also among his most disastrous foreign policy moves. In doing so, Trump effectively abandoned US-allied Kurdish forces who bore the brunt of the US-led campaign against ISIS to a Turkish military invasion.

The withdrawal induced a humanitarian crisis and created a security vacuum that Russia, Iran, and Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, an accused war criminal, all benefited from.


Failure: Replace the Affordable Care Act (AKA Obamacare)

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John McCain votes no on the GOP’s ‘skinny repeal’ healthcare bill.
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Screenshot/CNN

The late Sen. John McCain’s iconic “thumbs down” vote denied Trump a full congressional repeal (even a “skinny repeal”) of former President Barack Obama’s signature health care law.

However, Trump has had success in dismantling parts of the law. His tax bill included a roll back of the tax penalty for those who did not enroll in health care, and the Trump administration has had some success in the courts regarding the individual mandate.

Earlier in December, a federal appeals court struck down a core part of the law – the individual mandate. It did not overturn the entire law, sending it back to a lower court, and leaving the fate of Obamacare uncertain as an election year focused on health care intensifies.

What Trump has not done in his first three years is offer a replacement for the Affordable Care Act. As the Associated Press points out, as a candidate Trump promised “insurance for everybody” and a more immediate replacement to the nearly decade-old ACA.

The president said he would introduce a “phenomenal health care plan,” during an interview with ABC News in June.


Failure: Impeachment

Trump was impeached in the House of Representatives on December 18.

The House approved two articles of impeachment against Trump, one for abuse of power over his dealings with Ukraine and one for obstruction of Congress over his efforts to stonewall the impeachment inquiry.

Trump urged Ukraine to launch investigations into his political rivals as he simultaneously withheld about $400 million in congressionally-approved military aid from the country, which is fighting an ongoing war against pro-Russian separatists.

The president is likely to be acquitted in a Senate trial, but will still go down as just the third president in US history to be impeached.

‘How much can you send on Cash App?’: It depends on whether or not your account is verified — here’s what you need to know

If you have an unverified Cash App account, there are limits to how much you can send or receive, but if you confirm your account those limits will increase.

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If you have an unverified Cash App account, there are limits to how much you can send or receive, but if you confirm your account those limits will increase.
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Piotr Swat/Shutterstock

You can set up and start using a Cash App account in about three minutes. All you need to do is download the app, connect it to your phone number, email address, and bank account, and then transfer some funds to start sending and receiving money.

How much money you can send on Cash App depends on account verification

You can’t send large amounts of money with an unverified Cash App account. Cash App limits unverified accounts to a $250 send limit in a 7-day period, regardless of whether that’s one lump sum or spread out over myriad transactions. An unverified Cash App account is also limited to receiving $1,000 in a 30-day stretch of time.

If you want to send and receive more money, you need to go through a process of account verification. This process will be automatically initiated when you try to send an amount greater than the $250 limit imposed on non-verified accounts, or when someone tries to send you more than the $1,000 limit.

Money can be sent from a paired debit or credit card backed by Visa, AmEx, MasterCard, or Discover.

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Money can be sent from a paired debit or credit card backed by Visa, AmEx, MasterCard, or Discover.
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Steven John/Business Insider

Verifying your account usually means sharing your social security number, full name, and your date of birth, but the app also says that more information may be requested in some cases if this data is not sufficient.

With a verified account, you can send up to $7,500 per week and receive an unlimited amount of money.

Related coverage from How To Do Everything: Tech:

How to use your Cash Card after you sign up for and activate it in the Cash App

It's easy to use your Cash Card, which you can even customize when you sign up on the Cash App.

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It’s easy to use your Cash Card, which you can even customize when you sign up on the Cash App.
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Square

Cash App allows you to send money to friends, family, and vendors directly from your iPhone or Android phone.

The mobile payment platform, owned by Square, launched a Cash Card in 2017. The card lets users spend their Cash App balance at eligible retailers, and withdrawal money from ATMs (without a fee) across the US.

Basically it works just as you’d expect a debit card to work – purchases made using the Cash Card are taken out of your Cash App balance and cataloged on the Cash App.

Here’s what you need to know to use it.

Check out the products mentioned in this article:

iPhone 11 (From $699.99 at Best Buy)

Samsung Galaxy S10 (From $899.99 at Best Buy)

How to use the Cash App card, called Cash Card

If you haven’t already applied for a Cash Card, you can follow these steps to order your card in the Cash App.

Once your Cash Card comes in the mail, activate it using the Cash App. You will also be asked to assign a pin number to your Cash Card through the activation process, which you can change at any time.

After you have activated your Cash Card, you’ll be able to use it at retailers in the US who accept Visa. If you’ve used your Cash Card to buy something and then ended up returning it, refunds can take up to 10 days to reflect back on your balance.

In the Cash App, you can disable your Cash App card if you have temporarily misplaced it. If suspicious charges appear on your list of transactions, you can dispute them through Cash App support.

You can use your Cash Card physically or digitally through the app.

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You can use your Cash Card physically or digitally through the app.
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Money at 30/YouTube

You can also add your Cash Card to Apple Pay or Google Pay in case you find yourself without your physical card.

If you use your Cash Card to withdraw money from an ATM with a fee, Cash App will reimburse the fee, too, but only if your Cash Card receives a direct deposit of $50 or more a month.

If you would like to keep a record of your Cash App transactions, you can download your statement using a desktop computer by going to https://cash.app > Statements > Export.

Related coverage from How To Do Everything: Tech:

How to cash out on Cash App and transfer money to your bank account instantly

You can transfer funds in your Cash App account to your bank account using the app.

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You can transfer funds in your Cash App account to your bank account using the app.
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Square

  • To “cash out” on the Cash App, you simply have to transfer your balance in the app to your linked bank account.
  • If you aren’t familiar with Square’s Cash App, it’s a peer-to-peer payment app, like Venmo, that allows you to send and receive money with friends and family, without even being in the same room.
  • Here’s how to cash out on the Cash App.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Square’s Cash App is a peer-to-peer payment app, like Venmo, that allows you to send and receive money with friends and family, without needing to have cash on hand or even be in the same room. It’s perfect for things like splitting bills, chipping in for party snacks, or just splitting a meal.

When someone sends you money on the Cash App, it lives in the app. If you have a Square Cash Card, you can use it like a debit card and spend your balance anywhere that accepts Visa.

However, if you don’t have a Cash Card, or would simply rather transfer your balance back to your bank account, doing so is very simple, and can even be done instantly if need be.

Check out the products mentioned in this article:

iPhone 11 (From $699.99 at Best Buy)

Samsung Galaxy S10 (From $899.99 at Best Buy)

How to cash out on Cash App

1. Open the Cash App on your iPhone or Android.

2. Go to the “My Cash” tab by tapping the dollar amount in the middle of your screen.

Go to the

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Go to the “My Cash” tab.
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Melanie Weir/Business Insider

3. Underneath your balance, tap the button on the left that says “Cash Out.”

4. The “Cash Out” menu will pop up with your full balance amount autoselected for transfer. If you’d like to transfer less, use the touchscreen on your iPhone or Android to type in the amount.

Tap

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Tap “Cash Out.”
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Melanie Weir/Business Insider

5. Once you’ve decided how much you want to transfer, tap “Cash Out” at the bottom.

Enter the desired amount, then tap

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Enter the desired amount, then tap “Cash Out.”
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Melanie Weir/Business Insider

6. A pop-up will appear asking how you’d like to deposit the money. If you select “Standard,” the money will take one to three days to appear in your account. If you need the money immediately, you can tap “Instant” for a 25 cent fee.

Choose

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Choose “Standard” or “Instant.”
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Melanie Weir/Business Insider

Related coverage from How To Do Everything: Tech:

You can’t delete your Cash App transaction history, but there’s also no need to — here’s what you need to know

There's actually no need to delete your history in the Cash App since all transactions are already private.

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There’s actually no need to delete your history in the Cash App since all transactions are already private.
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Square

Peer-to-peer money transfer apps like the Cash App and Venmo are one of the conveniences brought to us by advancing technology. Instead of having to exchange bills and make change when someone owes us money, we can now simply send each other money on our phones.

If you’ve used the Cash App, you know that you can view all of your transaction history by tapping the clock icon in the bottom-right corner and opening the Activity tab. In this tab, you can also see a list of people you’ve recently interacted with in the app.

Tap the clock in the bottom-right corner to see your transactions.

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Tap the clock in the bottom-right corner to see your transactions.
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Melanie Weir/Business Insider

You can’t delete your Cash App transaction history, but there’s also no need to

You’ll also notice, however, that there is no way to delete these interactions. When you tap on a payment it simply gives the payment details and says if it’s pending or completed. You can tap the three dots in the top-right corner, but the only further options it gives you are to get a web receipt or to contact Support if something is wrong.

Tapping a payment does not allow you to delete it — it only gives you payment details.

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Tapping a payment does not allow you to delete it — it only gives you payment details.
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Melanie Weir/Business Insider

There’s no way to delete your history in your account settings either. When you go to “Privacy & Security,” your only options are to enable or change a PIN lock, make your cashtag searchable, or to enable or disable payment requests.

This isn’t very different than how Venmo works – Venmo also doesn’t let you delete your transaction history, but with Venmo’s settings you can choose to make all past and future transactions private.

Venmo has a social timeline where you can see other user’s payments. Cash App does not have this.

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Venmo has a social timeline where you can see other user’s payments. Cash App does not have this.
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Melanie Weir/Business Insider

However, the difference is that with the Cash App all of your transactions on the app are already private, meaning that only you and the other person involved in the payment can see it.

So, unless you don’t even want to see your transactions on your phone – in which case you’d have to delete your whole account – there’s no need to make your transactions private because they already are.

Related coverage from How To Do Everything: Tech:

How to permanently delete files from Google Drive on your Android device

You'll need to delete files from your Google Drive trash to permanently remove them.

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You’ll need to delete files from your Google Drive trash to permanently remove them.
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Henry Nicholls/Reuters

You can easily delete a file in Google Drive on your Android in a couple steps. You can either send the file to your Google Drive trash folder or permanently remove the file from the trash folder. The process is very simple.Here’s how to do it.

Check out the products mentioned in this article:

Samsung Galaxy S10 (From $899.99 at Best Buy)

How to delete files from Google Drive on Android

1. Launch the Google Drive app on your device. Tap the folder icon at the bottom right of the screen to be taken to a list of all files.

You can view a list of all the files in your Google Drive.

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You can view a list of all the files in your Google Drive.
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Michelle Greenlee/Business Insider

2. Tap the three-dot menu at the right of the file you want to remove.

3. Scroll down the menu that appears to locate the Remove option and tap Remove. The file will be sent to your Google Drive trash.

Tap

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Tap “Remove” to send the file to your Google Drive trash.
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Michelle Greenlee/Business Insider

You can remove files you own as well as files that have been shared with you. However, removing a shared file from your account only removes it from your view. The file owner will still own the file and have access to it.

How to permanently delete files from Google Drive on Android

When you remove a file it is sent to your Google Drive trash can. You can permanently delete items from the trash easily.

1. From inside the Google Drive app, tap the three-line menu at the top left of the app.

2. Tap “Trash” from the menu that appears. All items you have removed will appear.

Tap

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Tap “Trash” to view items that have been deleted.
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Michelle Greenlee/Business Insider

3. Tap the three-dot menu at the right side of the file you want to delete, then tap “Delete Forever.” You will be prompted to confirm the action and reminded there is no way to recover a file once it has been deleted.

Select

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Select “Delete forever” to permanently remove the file.
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Michelle Greenlee/Business Insider

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These were the biggest automotive stories of the 2010s

Tesla CEO Elon Musk closed out an eventful decade with the reveal of the Cybertruck.

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Tesla CEO Elon Musk closed out an eventful decade with the reveal of the Cybertruck.
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FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images

I started covering the global auto industry in the mid-2000s, but by 2010, I had no idea that the most eventful decade since the earliest days of motorized carriages and the Ford Model T in the early 20th century was upon us.

With Chrysler and General Motors fresh off bailouts and bankruptcies, the world economy staged for an epic comeback, China on the rise, and both electric-car and self-driving startups arriving left and right, the stage was set for 10 years of relentless innovation, scandal, controversy, and (for me) journalistic adventure.

It was, in a word, fun.

Here are all the big stories:


A new dawn for the electric car in 2010. GM might have offered it ill-fated EV1 in the 1990s, but when the new decade arrived, a slew a electric cars hit the scene, including the Nissan Leaf. Through the 2010s, startups would rise and fall.


Gas prices spiked in the US after the financial crisis. In some parts of the US, they rose above $4 a gallon and threatened $5. This encouraged automakers to develop smaller cars, but an oil-price collapse later in the decade spurred a revival of big SUVs and pickups.

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REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Tesla bought NUMMI in 2010, following the bankruptcy of GM and the end of a GM-Toyota joint venture that began in the 1980s. The new Tesla factory would be producing over 300,000 all-electric vehicles in Northern California by the end of the decade.

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REUTERS/Robert Galbraith

The US auto recovery began in the early 2010s. After cratering to an unfathomable 10 million in yearly sales in 2009, the industry bounced back and by 2015, crossed record levels above 17 million. The market would boom for the second half of the decade.

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Business Insider

GM returns from bailout and bankruptcy with a 2010 IPO that raises $20 billion. But the largest US automaker, a century old, has slimmed down, shedding brands such as Saturn and Hummer.

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REUTERS/Jeff Kowalsky/Files

Tesla took off. Tesla launched its first clean-sheet car design, the Model S, in 2012. The Model S would be named Motor Trend’s Car of the Year for 2013 — and Tesla’s stock began a dizzying ascent, punctuated by big dips during the 2010s.

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Tesla CEO Elon Musk.
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Reuters/Noah Berger

Takata’s massive airbag recall began in 2013. Takata’s airbags were in over 3 million vehicles worldwide. The inflators could malfunction, spraying occupants with shrapnel. The recall would drive the dominant airbag maker into bankruptcy.

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Thomson Reuters

Baseless concerns about subprime auto lending infected the market. Fearing a return to the securitized-debt crisis that created the financial crisis, naysayers seized on auto loans to credit-compromised buyers, but the crisis never materialized, despite yearly dispatches about how cars would create the next recession.

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REUTERS/Carlos Barria

In 2014, GM named Mary Barra as the first female CEO of a major automaker — and immediately had to deal with a massive ignition-switch recall that involved multiple deaths. The recall cost the automaker more than $5 billion.

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GM CEO Mary Barra.
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Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

Ford reinvented the mighty F-150 pickup truck. The Blue Oval took the plunge with America’s bestselling vehicle and the company’s cash cow, re-engineering the truck to use more lightweight aluminum.

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Ford

In 2014, Alan Mulally stepped down as CEO of Ford after saving the company during the financial crisis. The former Boeing exec had mortgaged the company to avoid a bailout, but he made the right, foresighted call.


Fiat CEO Sergio Marchionne forces out Ferrari’s longtime chairman, Luca di Montezemelo, and in 2014 sets the Italian automaker on a course to sell more vehicles and to attack new markets, such as China. By the end of 2010s, Ferrari would announce the unthinkable: an SUV.

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Former FCA CEO Sergio Marchionne and former Ferrari chairman Luca di Montezemelo.
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Business Insider/Getty Images

FCA and Ferrari IPOs. The carmakers listed on the NYSE in 2014 and 2015, and Ferrari went on to mint a market cap of $32 billion by the end of the decade.


Volkswagen is hit by the Dieselgate scandal. The German giant was found to have installed “defeat” software on its small diesel engines, to cheat on emissions tests. VW Group CEO Martin Winterkorn would step down and other VW Group leaders would be investigated as the 2015 crisis wore on.

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Former VW Group CEO Martin Winterkorn.
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Thomson Reuters

Tesla unveiled its Model X SUV in 2015, and CEO Elon Musk later said the vehicle so complicated that Tesla shouldn’t have built it.

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Ford wins Le Mans — 50 years after beating Ferrari in 1966. After debuting its Ford GT supercar, Ford staged a triumphant return to sports-car racing in 2016. I wrote a book about it.

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Matthew DeBord/BI

Check our Return to Glory: The Story of Ford’s Revival and Victory at the Toughest Race in the World.


GM bought Cruise Automation, a San Francisco self-driving startup, in 2016 for an all-in price of $1 billion. By the end of the decade, Cruise was worth almost $20 billion.

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GM Cruise

Trump! The unexpected election of the real-estate magnate and reality TV star as the 45th President of the United States meant that the auto industry would have political challenges from 2016 on. Trump jawboned Ford, GM, Toyota, and his administration sought to undo Obama-era emissions and fuel-economy standards.

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Getty/Chip Somodevilla

Tesla endured production hell with its Model 3. Tesla effort at creating a mass-market sedan was troubled from the start; much of 2017 was spent figuring out how to build the thing.

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Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

Jim Hackett became CEO of Ford in 2017, after Mark Fields stepped down. The former Steelcase CEO brought a futuristic vision to the 100-plus-year-old automaker.


Travis Kalanick, Uber’s founder and CEO, was deposed amid scandal. In 2017, Kalanick’s gruff, take-no-prisoners management style finally wore out Uber’s board and investors.

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Getty

The sedan was declared all-but-dead. In 2017, the Detroit Big Three began to embrace a market shift to SUVs and pickups. FCA led the charge, Ford followed, and GM reluctantly began to curtail sedan production.

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Joe Raedle/Getty

GM brought its Chevy Bolt EV to market in record time: announced in 2016, it went on sale in 2017, with 238 miles of range and price tag under $30,000, when a $7,500 federal tax credit was applied.

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Chevy Bolt EV.
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Mark Matousek / Business Insider

In 2018, Elon Musk infamously tweeted “funding secured,” asserting that he planned to take the company private. He failed to do that and was eventually penalized by the SEC, stripped of his Tesla chairmanship and compelled to pay millions in fines.

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Elon Musk.
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Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

In 2018, FCA and Ferrari CEO Sergio Marchionne died unexpectedly after surgery. It was a tragic end to one of the most flamboyant careers in the history of the car business. Marchionne took over a bankrupt Chrysler, joined it with Fiat, and saw the new company’s fortunes surge as consumers bought Jeeps and pickups.

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The late Sergio Marchionne.
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Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

Waymo One launched in Arizona. The Google Car project was spun off in 2016 and in late 2018 undertook the first commercial self-driving service in the US.

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Waymo

The architect of the Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi alliance, Carlos Ghosn was a business rock star in Japan. But in late 2018, he was arrested in the country on allegations of financial malfeasance. After 108 days and jail and then months of legal limbo, Ghosn would escape to Lebanon, where he holds citizenship.

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Carlos Ghosn.
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Reuters

Uber staged a much-anticipated yet underwhelming IPO in 2019. The ride-hailing giant, once valued at over $100 billion, struggled to realize a $50 billion market cap. Rival Lyft also endured a choppy IPO. Investors were left asking if the business models could ever make money.

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Johannes Eisele/Contributor/Getty

GM in 2019 dealt with the longest strike against a major US automaker since the 1970s. UAW workers walked out of GM factories for over 50 days.


Harley-Davidson’s groundbreaking LiveWire all-electric motorcycle went on sale in late 2019. The $30,000 bike sought to reshape the brand’s destiny.

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Harley-Davidson LiveWire.
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Harley-Davidson

The Tesla Cybertruck arrived. Hotly anticipated, Tesla revealed its stainless-steel-hulled future-mobile at the end of 2019 — unveiling a spectacularly controversial vehicle.

Tesla CEO Elon Musk closed out an eventful decade with the reveal of the Cybertruck.

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Elon Musk reveals the Tesla Cybertruck.
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FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images

The electric-car dawn that characterized the beginning of the 2010s became a supernova is 2019 as Porsche launched is Taycan EV. The high-performance four-door topped out at nearly $200,000.

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Porsche

Ford also shook up the electric-car market in 2019 by revealing an electric-SUV version of the Mustang, more than 50 years after the pony car hit the streets. First-edition versions of the car promptly sold out.

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Ford

By the end of 2019, Elon Musk’s cheeky “420” reference around Tesla’s stock came true. It has roared past $420 per share and its market cap was tens of billions higher than GMs. Tesla started the 2010s as the least valuable US automaker — but ended it as the most.

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Markets Insider

Angry protesters swarming the US embassy in Baghdad caps off Trump’s disastrous year in the Middle East

U.S. President Donald Trump participates in a video teleconference with members of the U.S. military at Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort in Palm Beach

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U.S. President Donald Trump participates in a video teleconference with members of the U.S. military at Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort in Palm Beach
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Reuters

  • The US embassy in Baghdad was consumed by violent protests on Tuesday, catalyzed by recent airstrikes that killed dozens of fighters in an Iran-backed militia.
  • The situation was emblematic of Trump’s disastrous year in the Middle East.
  • Tensions with Iran, linked to Trump’s decision to withdraw from the 2015 nuclear deal, fueled chaos throughout the region in 2019.
  • “Really hard to overstate how badly Trump has bungled things in the Middle East. One of the only good things going – anti-Iran street protests in Iraq – have now morphed into anti-U.S. protests,” Democratic Sen. Chris Murphy said in a tweet.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Protesters enraged over recent US airstrikes swarmed the US embassy in Baghdad on Tuesday, breaking into the compound and chanting “Death to America” before being pushed back by Iraqi security forces.

The chaotic situation, which unfolded on the final day of 2019, typified the disastrous year President Donald Trump has had in the Middle East.

The airstrikes, which took place on Sunday, killed dozens of fighters from Kataeb Hezbollah – an Iran-backed militia. They came after a rocket attack on Friday killed a US contractor and injured four US service members at a base in Kirkuk, which is in the northeastern part of the country.

The US has blamed Friday’s deadly attack on Kataeb Hezbollah, which is now seeking to see the US totally expelled from Iraq (and wants the US embassy to close). There are roughly 5,000 US troops in Iraq at present as part of the ongoing fight against ISIS.

Trump explicitly blamed Iran for the pandemonium at the embassy on Tuesday, which had US diplomats seeking refuge in a fortified safe room, the Washington Post reported.

“Iran killed an American contractor, wounding many,” Trump said in a tweet. “We strongly responded, and always will. Now Iran is orchestrating an attack on the U.S. Embassy in Iraq. They will be held fully responsible. In addition, we expect Iraq to use its forces to protect the Embassy, and so notified!”

Trump later tweeted: “To those many millions of people in Iraq who want freedom and who don’t want to be dominated and controlled by Iran, this is your time!” The president did not expand on what he meant in the cryptic tweet.

Defense Secretary Mark Esper on Tuesday said the US is sending “additional forces to support our personnel at the Embassy.” The US is sending about 100 more Marines to the embassy amid the violent protests.

The Trump administration is anxious to avoid an incident similar to the deadly attack on the US consulate in Benghazi, Libya, in 2012 under the Obama administration, Politico reported.

Correspondingly, as the situation at the embassy in Baghdad unfolded, Trump on Tuesday also tweeted: “The Anti-Benghazi!”

In separate tweets, Trump said the embassy was “safe” before going on to threaten Iran.

“The US Embassy in Iraq is, & has been for hours, SAFE! Many of our great Warfighters, together with the most lethal military equipment in the world, was immediately rushed to the site,” Trump said.

The president then added: “Iran will be held fully responsible for lives lost, or damage incurred, at any of our facilities. They will pay a very BIG PRICE! This is not a Warning, it is a Threat. Happy New Year!”

‘Really hard to overstate how badly Trump has bungled things in the Middle East’

In the past few months, protesters have hit the streets in Iraq to express their discontent over Iran’s overwhelming influence in the country’s internal affairs. But the recent US airstrikes have seen the anti-Iran demonstrations transition into anti-America protests, and Iraqi leaders on Monday accused the US of violating its sovereignty. There are now fears that Iraq could become the site of a proxy war between the US and Iran.

Responding to the unsettling scenes at the embassy in Baghdad, Democratic Sen. Chris Murphy of Connecticut, who sits on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, tweeted: “Really hard to overstate how badly Trump has bungled things in the Middle East. One of the only good things going – anti-Iran street protests in Iraq – have now morphed into anti-US protests thanks to Trump’s mishandling of Iran policy.”

John Bolton, Trump’s former national security adviser, had a different take.

“The attack on the US embassy in Baghdad is straight from Iran’s playbook in 1979,” Bolton tweeted, alluding to the Iran hostage crisis. He added: “It’s a sign of Iranian control over Shia militia groups, not a sign of Iraqi anti-Americanism. We must protect our citizens from Iranian belligerence.”

Beyond the situation on Tuesday, Trump has had a calamitous year in the region, and much of this can be traced back to his decision in May 2018 to withdraw the US from the 2015 Iran nuclear deal. Tensions have steadily risen between the US and Iran since Trump unilaterally pulled the US from the landmark pact – a move that was condemned by key US allies.

The animosity reached a boiling point over the summer, with a series of incidents in the Persian Gulf region, including oil tanker attacks. The tensions raised fears of a possible war between the US and Iran.

Meanwhile, Iran has taken multiple steps away from the crumbling nuclear deal, increasing anxiety among European powers. The deal was designed to prevent Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. Iran was in compliance with the deal for roughly a year after Trump withdrew from it.

The Trump administration has sought to squeeze Iran into sitting down and negotiating a tougher version of the 2015 nuclear deal with a slew of harsh economic sanctions as part of a “maximum pressure” campaign that has battered Iran’s economy. This strategy has shown few signs of success.

Democratic Sen. Bob Menendez of New Jersey, the ranking member on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, slammed Trump’s policy toward Iran in a statement on Tuesday.

“While the Trump Administration has touted its maximum pressure campaign against Iran, the results so far have been more threats against international commerce, emboldened more violent proxy attacks across the Middle East, and now, the death of an American citizen in Iraq,” Menendez said.

On top of the standoff with Iran, Trump was bashed by politicians on both sides of the aisle in October after withdrawing US troops from northern Syria. The pullout paved the way for a Turkish military incursion, which targeted US-backed Kurdish forces who bore the brunt of the US-led campaign against ISIS. The Turkish invasion prompted a humanitarian crisis.

Trump is heading into 2020, an election year, with US-linked unrest on multiple fronts in the Middle East and no clear solution to the complex array of problems converging upon the region.