7 great movies you can watch on Netflix this weekend

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Warner Bros

Nothing to do this weekend except scroll through Netflix’s wide selection of movies for hours on end?

We’re here to help. Every week, we look through what’s available on the streaming service and recommend seven movies you can watch over the weekend.

Some of our selections recently came to Netflix, and some have been available for while – you probably just missed them.

From the animated classic “The Prince of Egypt” to the lush ’90s drama “Interview with the Vampire,” these are some awesome movies on Netflix you can watch this weekend.

Here are seven movies on Netflix you should check out (along with their scores from Rotten Tomatoes).

Note: Not all of these films are available in countries outside the United States. Sorry!


“Get Smart” (2008)

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Warner Bros

Netflix description: When the identities of secret agents are compromised, hapless Maxwell Smart teams with far more capable Agent 99 to thwart an evil terrorist group.

Critic score: 50%

Audience score: 67%

“Get Smart” got lost in the massive summer movie collection, mostly because it relied on Steve Carell to carry the entire movie. But the thing is that Carell can carry a comedy like this, so it’s still pretty good and features some fun performances from Anne Hathaway, Terry Crews, and a very funny Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson.


“The Prince of Egypt” (1998)

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Dreamworks

Netflix description: Born into slavery but raised as the son of a pharaoh, Moses accepts his destiny: to lead the Hebrews out of slavery and into freedom.

Critic score: 79%

Audience score: 76%

It’s unfortunate that this beautifully animated film with catchy songs was whitewashed by Hollywood. But it’s still such a great movie that the whole family can watch and will definitely enjoy.


“Can’t Buy Me Love” (1987)

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Buena Vista Pictures

Netflix description: Tired of being an outcast, a nerdy teen offers his life savings of $1,000 to the most popular girl in school in exchange for dating him for a month.

Critic score: 50%

Audience score: 74%

This ’80s comedy with a very outdated premise is brought to life by the always and forever charming Patrick Dempsey.


“Interview with the Vampire” (1994)

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Columbia

Netflix description: The lives of a trio of vampires are interconnected for centuries in this tale that explores betrayal, love, loneliness, and hunger.

Critic score: 62%

Audience score: 86%

“Interview with the Vampire” is a perfect weekend watch. It’s campy but not stupid; stars Tom Cruise, Brad Pitt, Christian Slater, and a young Kirsten Dunst; and, unlike some very popular vampire movies, has a great story and gorgeous production design.


“The Wackness” (2008)

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Sony Pictures Classics

Netflix description: In the midst of a midlife crisis, a psychiatrist forms a relationship with a teenage drug dealer, who trades his product for therapy sessions.

Critic score: 70%

Audience score: 72%

This coming-of-age comedy helped Josh Peck of Nickelodeon’s “Drake and Josh” prove he has some acting skills beyond what he did on the children’s program. This charming movie (which also stars Mary-Kate Olsen) shows that familiar stories can become special with a clever script and impeccable casting.


“Bad Boys” (1995)

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Sony

Netflix description: In this fast-paced actioner, two Miami narcotics cops are hot on the trail of a master crook who has snatched $100 million worth of heroin.

Critic score: 42%

Audience score: 78%

This is a Michael Bay movie, so expect explosions in the background of Will Smith and Martin Lawrence showcasing their sparkling chemistry. Surprisingly, there are zero transformers in this one.


“The Lost Boys” (1987)

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Warner Bros

Netflix description: After his brother drinks blood and gets mixed up with a gang rumored to be a coven of vampires, Sam and his friends try to rid the town of evil.

Critic score: 74%

Audience score: 85%

This stylish satire about teenage vampires blends comedy with horror seamlessly. It’s not a perfect movie by any means – it’s directed by Joel Schumacher, who also directed “Batman & Robin” – but it does star a young Kiefer Sutherland as one of the bad guys, which is fun to revisit.