The majority of Americans feel ‘less safe’ after Iranian general Qassem Soleimani’s death, according to new poll

President Donald Trump.

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President Donald Trump.
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Kevin Lamarque/Reuters
  • In a recent USA Today poll, Americans say said they feel “less safe” after a drone strike killed top Iranian general Qasem Soleimani.
  • USA Today conducted an online survey of 1,005 adults on Tuesday and Wednesday.
  • The survey results showed that Americans overwhelmingly feared terrorist attacks on American soil and a possible war with Iran.
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Donald Trump’s decision to carry out a drone strike to kill top Iranian general Qasem Soleimani drastically escalated already terse tensions with Iran – and in a recent poll by USA Today, a majority (by a margin of 52% to 24%) of Americans said that decision made them feel “less safe.”

USA Today conducted an online survey of 1,005 adults in the US on Tuesday and Wednesday, during which time the Iranian attack on US bases took place. They asked participants questions related to the recent conflict with Iran and how it has affected the country with “a credibility interval of plus or minus 3.5 percentage points.”

The survey showed Americans were divided on the fatal drone strike at the Baghdad airport that killed Soleimani and others; 42% supported the decision and 33% opposed it. Twenty-five percent said they didn’t know what to think. While independents were nearly evenly split, more Republicans were supportive of Trump’s military action. One thing that a majority of Americans could agree upon was that Trump’s behavior with Iran was “reckless” by a margin of 52% to 34%. Sixty-three percent of participants feared that there would be terrorist attacks on American soil, due to Soleimani’s death.

Americans also overwhelmingly believed that the drone strike that killed Soleimani increased the likelihood that there would be more violence. Sixty-nine percent said they believed that Iran was now more likely to strike American interests in the Middle East and 62% said they believed there would be a war between the two countries.

The assassination of Soleimani prompted swift and united public outcry from Iranians, and last Wednesday, following Soleimani’s death, Iran launched a barrage of missiles at a US base. The president later announced that there were no American casualties in the strike at a press conference from the White House.

On Wednesday, during a brief speech at the White House, the president backed away from further violent conflict with Iran, but threatened to impose even stronger economic sanctions against the country instead. In spite of the threats, Trump said the US was “ready to embrace peace with all who seek it.”

USA Today disclosed that the survey was completed prior to Trump’s White House address.