Trump endorses ‘very good guys’ Boris Johnson and Nigel Farage ahead of UK visit

source
Nigel Farage / Twitter

  • Donald Trump says he may meet with “very good guys” Boris Johnson and Nigel Farage when he arrives in the UK next week.
  • Johnson is the current favourite to replace Theresa May as prime minister this summer, while Farage’s Brexit Party won the recent European elections in the UK.
  • Trump’s visit is controversial in the UK with the House of Commons speaker John Bercow previously banning the president from speaking in parliament.
  • Visit Business Insider’s home page for more stories.

LONDON – Donald Trump has said he could meet with Boris Johnson and Nigel Farage when he visits the country next week, lauding them as “very good guys” and “big powers” in the United Kingdom.

The US President said on Thursday that he may meet with Johnson, who is the current frontrunner to replace Theresa May as Conservative leader and prime minister, during his state visit to the UK on June 3-5.

He also paid tribute to Brexit Party leader Farage, who he congratulated on a “big victory” in last week’s European elections. The Brexit Party won 32% of the national vote despite being just weeks old.

“Nigel Farage is a friend of mine. Boris is a friend of mine. They are two very good guys, two very interesting people,” Trump told journalists in footage released this afternoon.

“Nigel has had a big victory. He picked up 32% of the vote, starting from nothing.

“I think they are big powers over there. I think they’ve done a good job.”

Asked whether he wanted Johnson to replace May as prime minister in the upcoming Conservative leadership contest, he said: “Well I like them they’re friends of mine but I haven’t thought about supporting them.

“Maybe it’s not business to support people. But I have lot of respect for those men.”

Johnson’s Trump flip flop

Trump protest London

source
REUTERS/Dylan Martinez

In 2017 Johnson, who is the most popular candidate to succeed May among Tory members, described Trump as a “great global brand” who was “penetrating corners of the global consciousness that “other presidents have ever done.”

He urged European leaders to stop their “whinge-o-rama” about Trump when he was elected president in 2016.

However, prior to his election as president, Johnson said Trump was “unfit” for high office and accused him of “stupefying ignorance” after he called on the US government to block Muslims from entering the country.

Trump’s visit has already caused huge controversy in the UK.

He is set to be greeted by huge protests when he visits the UK next week.

Around 250,000 people are expected to protest in London and other cities around the country against what the Stop Trump campaign describes as Trump’s “divisive politics and policies of bigotry, hate and greed.”

The House of Commons Speaker John Bercow has said previously that he will ban Trump from addressing parliament due to his “racism and to sexism, and our support for equality before the law.”

The US President is set to meet the Queen and take part in D-day commemorations during his visit.