Elon Musk fact-checked his own Wikipedia page and requested edits including the fact he does ‘zero investing’

  • Elon Musk has been perusing his Wikipedia page and suggesting edits.
  • The billionaire tweeted Sunday taking issue with being described as an investor on his Wikipedia page, saying he did “basically zero investing.”
  • His page was edited to remove the word “investor” later that day.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Tesla CEO Elon Musk has been spending the run-up to Christmas checking his Wikipedia page.

“Just looked at my wiki for 1st time in years. It’s insane!” Musk tweeted on Sunday, saying the page was “a war zone with a zillion edits.”

The tech billionaire also took issue with some of the language in the article. “Can someone please delete ‘investor.’ I do basically zero investing,” he wrote.

“If Tesla & SpaceX go bankrupt, so will I. As it should be,” he added, implying that most of his wealth consisted of his stock in the two companies. He made a similar argument during his legal fight with the UK cave diver Vernon Unsworth, during which he said he was cash-poor.

A Twitter user asked Musk whether Tesla counted as an investment, to which he replied that he’d rolled the proceeds of all his companies forward into one another. “These are all companies where I played fundamental founding role. Not right to ask others to put in money if I don’t put in mine,” he said.

Another Twitter user suggested that the term investor could be replaced with “business magnet,” to which Musk replied “Yes” followed by a laughing emoji and a heart emoji. Musk has previously joked he would like to be known as a business magnet, as opposed to a business magnate.

At 8:11 p.m. on Sunday an edit was made to Musk’s Wikipedia page that replaced investor with business magnet, “as requested by Elon Musk,” according to the page’s history. “Business magnet” has since been erased, but the “investor” edit was left unchanged.

Musk has been known to invest in companies: He was an early investor in the artificial-intelligence research startup DeepMind before it was bought by Google’s parent company, Alphabet, in 2014. Musk told Vanity Fair in 2017 that he invested in DeepMind to keep an eye on the progress of AI rather than for financial return.