Indiana investigators held a burial for the remains of more than 2,400 fetuses found in an abortion provider’s garage and car

  • When Dr. Ulrich Klopfer, a suspected hoarder, died in September, his family found fetal remains stored in his home.
  • The family contacted authorities and investigators discovered that the abortion provider had preserved and stored 2,411 fetal remains in his car and garage.
  • On Wednesday, Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill hosted a mass burial service for the fetuses.
  • Hill, a Republican, is facing the loss of his law license over a groping scandal.
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They were found in the garage, and the trunk of a car – more than 100 boxes filled with the remains of more than 2,400 fetuses.

On Wednesday, Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill presided over a mass burial for the fetuses found at longtime abortion provider Ulrich Klopfer’s home – an event that’s managed to rile people on both sides of the abortion debate.

During the service, Hill repeatedly referred to the fetuses as “unborn babies” and spoke of their lost potential.

“How many of these women, who were undoubtedly in despair over an unwanted pregnancy, would have agreed to a procedure if they had known that a doctor was going to transport their unborn child across state lines and leave them ghoulishly packed up and stored in his garage or carelessly discarded in the trunk of his car for nearly two decades?” Hill asked at the burial service at Southlawn Cemetery in South Bend. Klopfer died in September.

Indiana has some of the strictest abortion laws in the country. A 2016 law requires that fetal remains be buried or cremated after an abortion.

Hill said that the fetuses buried Wednesday were likely aborted in the early 2000s in Fort Wayne, Gary, and South Bend and then taken to the doctor’s Chicago-area home.

“Although these abortions took place between 2000 and 2003, until today the remains had yet to receive an appropriate resting place,” he said.

Klopfer’s Fort Wayne clinic closed in 2014, and the Gary and South Bend clinics closed the next year.

His medical license was suspended in 2016 by Indiana regulators who cited shoddy record-keeping and substandard patient monitoring.

At the time of the discovery, and when an AG investigation was launched, both anti-abortion and pro-abortion activists chimed in, according to the Washington Post.

Vice President and former Indiana governor Mike Pence said it should “shock the conscience of every American.” Democratic presidential candidate and former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg called the discovery “extremely disturbing” and said he hoped the case “doesn’t get caught up in politics at a time when women need access to health care.”

Klopfer appeared to be a hoarder, the Indianapolis Star reported.

At the South Bend clinic, boxes, garbage, and debris were stacked from “floor to the ceiling” in each room, the paper said.

Health records were found among rotting food, hundreds of empty soda cans and protein shake bottles, and medical supplies, including loose syringes, reported the Indianapolis Star.

“It’s one thing to have a law that requires medical facilities to bury or cremate fetuses, it’s another thing to make sure they do it,” Hill previously told the Star. “So there may be some regulations that are put in place to ensure that there is adequate record-keeping and processing and confirmation that these fetuses aren’t discarded like so much trash.”

The burial service came at a time when Hill’s license to practice law is in question. The attorney general was accused of groping a female state legislator and three other women at an Indianapolis bar in 2018 and the Indiana Supreme Court Disciplinary Commission has recommended that his license be suspended.