Public health researchers say James Bond is a ‘severe’ alcoholic with a chronic consumption problem

James Bond is licensed to swill.

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James Bond is licensed to swill.
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Skyfall/MGM and Sony Pictures/Screenshot

  • James Bond suffers from chronic alcohol use disorder, researchers say.
  • Analysis by a team from the University of Otago in New Zealand found that 007 drank on 109 separate occasions across 24 films.
  • At its peak (Daniel Craig in “Quantum of Solace”) Bond’s blood alcohol level would be sufficient to kill some people.
  • The researchers advised the secret agent to seek professional help and “find other strategies for managing on-the-job stress.”
  • They were also critical of Bond’s employer, MI6, for failing to refer him to work-funded counselling or psychiatric support services.

James Bond‘s martini-drinking habits may not be all too healthy, according to public health researchers.

An analysis of the fictional tuxedoed MI6 agent’s drinking behaviour was recently published in the Medical Journal of Australia’s Christmas issue – and it’s bad news for 007.

Researchers from the University of Otago in New Zealand watched all 24 James Bond movies from across six decades, analyzing the eponymous hero’s drinking habits throughout.

Read more: The creator of Grey Goose vodka has revealed whether the perfect martini should be shaken or stirred

The study found that Bond had been involved 109 drinking events across all films, averaging 4.5 per film, and that at its peak (Daniel Craig in “Quantum of Solace”), Bond’s blood alcohol level would have been sufficient to kill some people.

Sean Connery as the original movie James Bond.

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Sean Connery as the original movie James Bond.
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United Artists

“James Bond has a severe chronic alcohol problem,” the study concluded.

“He should consider seeking professional help and find other strategies for managing on-the-job stress.”

The study found that Bond fulfilled at least six of the 11 criteria for severe alcohol use disorder, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5).

Lead author Professor Nick Wilson of the University of Otago noted that chronic risks for Bond included frequently drinking prior to fights, high stakes gambling, extreme athletic performance, and sex with enemies, sometimes with guns or knives in the bed.

The researchers were also critical of the secret agent’s employers, saying: “MI6 should be a more responsible employer by referring him to work-funded counselling or psychiatric support services for managing his alcohol use disorder.

“These services should also determine whether he has any post-traumatic stress after killing so many people and having been tortured so often (eg, in Casino Royale, Spectre).”

They added: “More training in how to negotiate with enemies may also reduce the need for killing them, as might MI6 placing limitations on his ‘licence to kill.'”