Kraft is selling ‘Salad Frosting’ — ranch dressing in a pouch — that’s meant to trick kids into eating more healthily, but it’s not all that good for you

Kraft's new, limited-edition

caption
Kraft’s new, limited-edition “Salad Frosting” packages Kraft’s classic ranch dressing in a colorful frosting tube.
source
Kraft

  • Kraft says it wants to help parents convince their kids to eat more vegetables with its new “Salad Frosting,” which packages Kraft’s Classic Ranch Dressing in a colorful frosting tube.
  • Parents can enter to win a free sample by tweeting the best lies they’ve told their kids, with #LieLikeAParent and #contest in the post, before Friday, June 14, at 11:59 CT, according to a press release from Kraft.
  • Although Kraft says its product is meant to inspire kids to eat healthily, nutritionists say ranch dressing is one of the unhealthiest dressings due to its fat and sodium content.
  • Visit INSIDER’s homepage for more stories.

It’s no secret that kids are often resistant to eating vegetables. Kraft says it wants to help parents solve this problem with its latest product that’s intended to appeal to kids.

The brand’s new, limited-edition “Salad Frosting” is designed to help parents trick their kids into eating more greens by packaging Kraft’s Classic Ranch Dressing in a colorful frosting tube.

Along with the rollout of its new product, the company says it is sending free samples of “Salad Frosting” to 1,500 parents across the US. According to Kraft’s press release, parents should share the best lies they’ve told their kids on Twitter and include the hashtags #LieLikeAParent and #contest in their post in order to win. The sweepstakes close on Friday, June 14 at 11:59 CT, according to the press release.

According to the details of the contest, the approximate retail value of a Salad Frosting package is $2.79. It’s unclear when Salad Frosting will hit shelves, but INSIDER has reached out to Kraft to find out more.

Kraft's new, limited-edition

caption
Kraft’s new, limited-edition “Salad Frosting” packages Kraft’s classic ranch dressing in a colorful frosting tube.
source
Kraft

Kraft’s product is intended to help inspire kids to eat more vegetables, but ranch dressing isn’t necessarily that good for you

Kraft says its “Salad Frosting” is meant to help parents get their kids to eat more healthily.

“Innocent lies parents tell their kids help alleviate the pressures of everyday parenting,” Kraft Head of Marketing Sergio Eleuterio said in a press release from the brand. “If it gets kids to eat their greens, so be it.”

Registered dietition Andy Bellatti told INSIDER that he’s skeptical about the efficacy of products like the “Salad Frosting.”

“First of all, the lie only works for about five seconds,” Bellatti said. “Once a child bites into their salad and realizes the ‘frosting’ isn’t sweet, the jig is up. And then what? The other issue here is that children need to be allowed to explore foods for what they actually are. If a child doesn’t like salad, don’t force it on them with gimmicks and lies. All this drama around mealtime only creates anxiety and ‘issues’ around food.”

Instead, Bellatti suggests that parents continue to provide various vegetable options during mealtime and encourage their kids to try new foods when they’re ready.

According to some nutritionists, ranch salad dressing is one of the unhealthiest dressings you could add to your meal.

In January 2019, the HuffPost asked three registered dietitians – Pegah Jalali, of Middleberg Nutrition; Jonathan Valdez, of Genki Nutrition; and Rebecca Ditkoff, of Nutrition by RD – to rank salad dressings from the most to least healthful. Ranch dressing (in this case, Hidden Valley ranch dressing) landed at the bottom of HuffPost’s ranking due to its sodium and fat content.

According to Kraft’s website My Food and Family, which provides nutrition information for its products, a two-tablespoon (or 30-gram) serving of its Classic Ranch Dressing contains 11 grams of fat (including 1.5 grams of saturated fat), 290 milligrams of sodium, one gram of sugar, and 110 calories.

Read more: RANKED: These are the salad dressings with the fewest calories

While this doesn’t sound all that bad on the surface, as the HuffPost article points out, people often consume more than the recommended two-tablespoon serving size of dressing. And by adding too much salad dressing, people could be adding extra fat, sodium, and sugar to an otherwise healthy meal.

According to its packaging, Kraft’s “Salad Frosting” contains 257 milliliters of dressing, though it’s unclear if the recommended serving size for this version of its dressing is the same as its Classic Ranch Dressing. INSIDER has reached out to the company for additional comment.