‘I was a naive’: Medical resident accused of making anti-Semitic comments apologizes for ‘the pain I have caused’

An image of what purports to be Lara Kollab's now-deleted Facebook page.

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An image of what purports to be Lara Kollab’s now-deleted Facebook page.
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Canary Mission

  • Dr. Lara Kollab, a former medical resident who was dismissed after her anti-Semitic tweets made several years ago were uncovered, released a statement apologizing for her remarks.
  • Kollab said she made the statements between 2011 to 2017, when she was in her teens and twenties. She now says she wants to “sincerely and unequivocally” apologize for what she called “offensive and hurtful language.”
  • She stressed that she understood the timeline of her posts did not excuse her from “causing pain, anguish, and a public outcry,” and said her past remarks are not reflective of her character today.

Dr. Lara Kollab, a former medical resident who was dismissed after her anti-Semitic tweets made several years ago were uncovered, released a statement apologizing for her remarks.

Kollab said she made the statements between 2011 to 2017, when she was in her teens and twenties. She now says she wants to “sincerely and unequivocally” apologize for what she called “offensive and hurtful language.”

“These posts were made years before I was accepted into medical school, when I was a naïve, and impressionable girl barely out of high school,” Kollab said. “I matured into a young adult during the years I attended college and medical school, and adopted strong values of inclusion, tolerance, and humanity.”

Kollab stressed that she understood the timeline of her posts did not excuse her from “causing pain, anguish, and a public outcry,” and said it was not reflective of her character today. The former resident, who said she visited Israel and the Palestine Territories numerous times in her teens, was moved by “the suffering of the Palestinians under the Israeli occupation.”

The Cleveland Clinic.

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The Cleveland Clinic.
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HealthMonitor/Wikimedia Commons

“I had difficulty constructively expressing my intense feelings about what I witnessed in my ancestral land,” Kollab said.

“Like many young people lacking life experience, I expressed myself by making insensitive remarks and statements of passion devoid of thought, not realizing the harm and offense these words would cause.”

“I have learned from this experience and am sorry for the pain I have caused,” Kollab added. “I pray that the Jewish community will understand and forgive me.”

Kollab’s remarks were first reported on by Canary Mission, a group that exposes anti-Semitism stemming from college campuses in the US.

Among her numerous tweets, Kollab claimed she “purposely give all the yahood [Jews] the wrong meds” and described Touro College, the Jewish-founded college in New York she attended, as “annoying” because it was “in a city full of Jews,” according to Canary Mission.

The Cleveland Clinic on Wednesday confirmed in a statement that a “former employee” was no longer working at the Clinic after their comments on social media were discovered.

“In no way do these beliefs reflect those of our organization,” the hospital said in a statement. “We fully embrace diversity, inclusion and a culture of safety and respect across our entire health system.”