Around 1 million square feet of sea ice melted in July as the globe experienced its hottest month in history

  • New data released by climate monitoring groups confirmed that July 2019 was the hottest month ever recorded, and sea ice in the Arctic and Antarctic were at their lowest levels for July.
  • Earlier this month, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) predicted that July had shattered climate records, and in doing so had “re-written climate history.”
  • According to a report released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on Thursday, the average global temperature in July was 1.71 degrees Fahrenheit (0.95 degrees Celsius) higher than the 20th century average, beating out the previous hottest month on record set in July 2016.
  • According to NOAA data, by the end of July, both Arctic and Antarctic sea ice extent were at their lowest levels on record for July.
  • Deke Arndt, head of climate monitoring for NOAA, told reporters that if the sea ice loss were a country, it would roughly equal in size to the 10th largest nation in the world, which is Algeria.
  • Record-breaking heatwaves and “unprecedented” wildfires have been observed across the world in recent weeks.
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Sea ice in the Arctic and Antarctic were at their lowest levels for July, according to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration data.

Deke Arndt, head of climate monitoring for NOAA, told reporters that if the sea ice loss were a country, it would roughly equal in size to the 10th largest nation in the world, which is Algeria.

The average Arctic sea ice levels were running 19.8% below average at around 726,000 square miles, while the Antarctic sea ice coverage was 4.3% below average at 250,000 square miles. According to NOAA, that’s an average sea ice loss of 40,800 square miles per day.

July 2019 temperature.

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July 2019 temperature.
source
NOAA

New data released by climate monitoring groups confirmed that July 2019 was the hottest month ever recorded.

According to a report released by the NOAA on Thursday, the average global temperature in July was 1.71 degrees Fahrenheit (0.95 degrees Celsius) higher than the 20th century average of 60.4 degrees Fahrenheit (15.7 degrees Celsius), beating out the previous hottest month on record set in July 2016.

Earlier this month, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) predicted that July had shattered climate records, and in doing so had “re-written climate history.”

Record-breaking heatwaves and “unprecedented” wildfires have been observed, with huge portions of Russia, Alaska, and Greenland battling massive flames visible from space.

Read more: Paris just recorded its hottest temperature in history as a blistering heat wave sweeps across Europe

“Carbon emissions from these wildfires could exacerbate climate warming for decades to come,” wrote Carly Phillips, a climate researcher at the Union of Concerned Scientists, last month.

Since the beginning of June, the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS) observed more than 100 intense and long-lasting fires in the Arctic Circle, which is normally frozen.

According to the WMO, the cloud of smoke emitted from a wildfire Siberia was larger than the European Union.

According to NOAA, nine of the 10 warmest Julys have occurred since 2005. July also marks the 415th consecutive month which has recorded temperatures higher than the 20th-century average.

Temperatures in June also peaked to their highest on record, with record-breaking heat measured in Eastern Europe, northern Russia, Asia, Africa, South America, the north Indian Ocean, and across parts of the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans.

NASA-GISS director Gavin Schmidt tweeted last month that 2019 had a 90% chance of beating last year’s average temperature and may be on track to become the hottest year on record.