Poll shows Americans think the country is on the ‘wrong track’ after shutdown

The US Capitol on Sunday, day 30 of the record partial government shutdown.

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The US Capitol on Sunday, day 30 of the record partial government shutdown.
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REUTERS/Al Drago

  • A majority of Americans are discouraged about the state of the country, according to a recent NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll.
  • Just over 60% of respondents said they believe the country is on the “wrong track,” and nearly 70% said they felt negative about the current state of the country.
  • The results come after the longest shutdown in American history and amid sharp partisan tensions that are put on display almost daily.

The majority of Americans are disappointed with the state of the country, with 63% saying they believe the country is on the “wrong track,” according to a new NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll.

Nearly 70% of respondents said they felt negative about the current state of the country, using terms including “downhill,” “concerned,” “chaos,” and “divided” to describe what the felt the next year held for America.

The poll was reportedly conducted before a deal was announced to temporarily end the longest shutdown in American history by President Donald Trump, who a majority of respondents said they blame for the shutdown.

Respondents’ negativity mirrors an INSIDER poll that found most Americans saw Trump as responsible for the shutdown and faulted his hardline strategy.

Read more: Trump’s strategy for the government shutdown is a mess and most Americans aren’t on board

Trump seemed to be at the center of respondent’s negative feelings concerning US policy, but results showed many appreciate his dominant personality traits.

An overwhelming 49% said they felt “not at all confident” that Trump “has the right set of goals and policies.” Compare that to 15.5 % in 2008 and 2009 for former president Barack Obama and 21% in 2001 for George W. Bush.

Trump was most highly marked for “being direct and straightforward in communicating with the American people,” “changing business as usual in Washington,” “being effective and getting things done,” and “being a good negotiator.”

Ha was rated poorly on being “steady and reliable,” “knowledgeable and experienced,” “honest and trustworthy,” and “having high personal and ethical standards.”