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Right upper teeth of the Homo luzonensis individual CCH6. From left to right: two premolars and 3 molars.

Scientists may have discovered a new human species. It lived on a tiny island in the Philippines at the same time as Homo sapiens.

Anthropologists may have discovered a new human relative named Homo luzonensis on the island of Luzon in the Philippines.
About 38% of Americans, ages 18 to 29, have at least one tattoo, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Scientists have found one of the world’s oldest surviving tattooing kits — with needles made of human bone

On the island of Tongatapu, Tonga, archaeologists have found one of the world's oldest tattooing kits. Some of the needles were made of human bone.
The giant ground sloth bones at Campo Laborde.

Humans once hunted and butchered giant ground sloths in South America, 12,600-year-old bones reveal

Giant sloth fossils from a site in Argentina reveal that the animal was hunted and killed by humans 12,600 years ago.
Children and young llamas were buried together outside the town of Huanchaco, Peru.

Ancient graves hid the skeletons of more than 260 children who likely had their hearts removed. It is the largest known child sacrifice, and archaeolo...

Near the modern-day town of Huanchaco, Peru, archaeologists uncovered 269 children, 466 llamas, and 3 adults who had all been ritually sacrificed.
Archaeologists unearth the remains of a sacrificed child near the surfing and fishing town of Huanchaquito, Trujillo September 13, 2011.

Ancient graves hid the skeletons of 269 children and 466 llamas who were ritually sacrificed, and archaeologists still don’t know why

Archaeologists uncovered 269 children, 466 llamas, and 3 adults that had been ritually killed near the modern-day coastal town of Huanchaco, Peru.

People hadn’t set foot in this ancient ‘lost city’ in the Honduran jungle for 500 years. Now the government is fighting to save it.

The Honduras government is fighting to save the Moskitia rainforest, home to an ancient "White City" that remained untouched for 500 years.

A handful of recent discoveries has transformed our entire understanding of human history

Our understanding of human history has been thoroughly upended by a number of discoveries over the past few years. There's less certainty now about how long ago we evolved, when humans spread around the world, and how we co-existed with other hominid species.
This graphical abstract shows two waves of Denisovan ancestry have shaped present-day humans.

Ancient humans had sex and interbred with a mysterious group known as the Denisovans more than once, new research has found

Early humans spread around the globe, encountered hominin species like Denisovans and Neanderthals, and interbred with them. We see traces of that in DNA today.

Why we knock on wood, and the truth about 7 other common superstitions

The backstories behind some of the most common superstitions are pretty silly, so why do we still do them today?
The ladder shape composed of red horizontal and vertical lines (centre left) dates to older than 64,000 years and was made by Neanderthals.

Scientists have pinpointed when the first cave paintings were made — and it means Neanderthals were more advanced than they thought

Long before "modern" humans reached Europe, our Neanderthal cousins were creating cultural objects and painting animals in caves in Spain.