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A 401(k) rollover isn't as complicated as it sounds.

A rollover IRA can make retirement savings less complicated, no matter how many jobs you’ve held

In a 401(k) rollover, you move retirement savings from one tax-advantaged retirement account to another: the rollover IRA.

It could take up to 6 years for all the money in your office retirement account to actually be yours

Every 401(k) plan has a vesting schedule, which tells the employee how much of the employer's contributions they own at any given point.

5 tips to help your money last until you’re 100, according to a financial planner

Once you're getting close to retiring, there are a few strategies you can use to stretch the savings you have, a financial planner says.
Employees over 50 can contribute a lot more to their 401(k) plan than younger employees.

3 ways your office 401(k) gives you more money than you realize

About 55 million Americans save for retirement in a 401(k). Automatic salary deferrals can drastically reduce an employee's taxable income.

3 financial decisions that will make it harder to retire

The first costs to cut for retirement are your debt, housing, and car. If you choose to spend more, it could make it harder to save for retirement.

3 expenses to avoid if you want to retire in 10 years

If you want to retire in 10 years, it's smart to keep saving — but you'll also want to turn a sharp eye to your expenses.

5 things to do by 50 to make sure you can retire when you want

Wondering how to prepare for retirement? By 50, you want to be maxing out your retirement accounts, paying off your debt, and streamlining expenses.
It's never too early to start your retirement savings.

Here’s how much more money you’d have for retirement if you saved $100 a month starting at 25 instead of 35

If two people save $100 a month for retirement, but one starts at 25 and the other at 35, the early saver will have nearly twice as much by age 65.
Fees alone aren't enough reason not to use a 401(k).

The difference between typical and expensive 401(k) fees can come down to a single percentage point, but most people have no idea what they’re p...

Fees alone aren't enough reason not to use a 401(k), but being charged 2% or more means that money might be better off elsewhere.

Here’s exactly how to figure out when you can retire

When can you retire? Americans can start claiming Social Security benefits between ages 65 and 67, but retirement isn't one size fits all.