‘We didn’t invite you here’: Observers gave Trump an icy welcome as his motorcade traveled to a synagogue shooting memorial in Pittsburgh

An estimated 4,000 people gathered to march for solidarity in the Squirrel Hill neighborhood while President Donald Trump was visiting October 30, 2018 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The march was in support of the victims of the Tree of Life mass shooting October 27, 2018.

caption
An estimated 4,000 people gathered to march for solidarity in the Squirrel Hill neighborhood while President Donald Trump was visiting October 30, 2018 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The march was in support of the victims of the Tree of Life mass shooting October 27, 2018.
source
Jeff Swensen/Getty Images

  • President Donald Trump received an icy welcome in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Tuesday while visiting the city to grieve with members of the Jewish community following a mass shooting there on Saturday.
  • The shooting at the Tree of Life synagogue left 11 Jewish worshippers dead.
  • Trump earned some criticism over the weekend for comments he made after the shooting, including an assertion that the deaths could have been prevented if the synagogue had an armed security guard.

Observers gave President Donald Trump an icy welcome as he arrived in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on Tuesday to attend a memorial for people killed in a shooting at a Jewish synagogue there on Saturday.

Eleven worshippers were shot at the Tree of Life synagogue in the Squirrel Hill neighborhood of Pittsburgh.

People lined the streets on Tuesday to watch the presidential motorcade. According to a White House pool report, a few people in the crowd gave a thumbs down or a middle finger as Trump and his entourage drove by. One sign read, “We didn’t invite you here.”

“One man holding a baby shouted ‘Trump loves Nazis,'” the pool report said.

Tree of Life synagogue’s rabbi Jeffrey Myers said Trump “is always welcome.”

“I’m a citizen. He’s my president. He is certainly welcome,” Myers said on Monday.

Trump initially condemned the shooting and acts of anti-Semitic violence.

But Trump caught some flak while hosting a campaign rally in Illinois hours after the shooting when he declared, “We can’t let evil change our life and change our schedule.”

Trump also drew criticism for appearing to politicize Saturday’s tragedy by reverting to talking points on gun laws in a response to questions from reporters, saying firearm regulations would have had “little to do” with preventing the mass shooting.

“If there was an armed guard inside the temple, they would have been able to stop him,” Trump said on Saturday, according to CNN.