Here’s what 12 of Uber’s earliest employees are doing now, from the former intern who’s now a powerful exec to the ousted former CEO who’s worth $5.4 billion

Former Uber CEO Travis Kalanick is worth $5.4 billion.

caption
Former Uber CEO Travis Kalanick is worth $5.4 billion.
source
Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

In 2009, a tiny startup called UberCab was founded; today, it’s just called Uber, and it’s one of Silicon Valley’s most successful companies. Uber operates in more than 700 cities worldwide.

Now, Uber has officially gone public in one of the most highly anticipated IPOs of all time. Some of Uber’s first investors stood to make up to $1.3 billion in total after the IPO, according to Bloomberg.

Read more: Uber is sliding after its IPO, and Main Street traders who struggled to invest dodged a bullet

Many of Uber’s earliest employees still work at Uber, including former intern Austin Geidt, who’s now the Head of Strategy for the company’s Advanced Technologies Group and rang the opening bell at the New York Stock Exchange on the day of Uber’s IPO.

Others have left to pursue other startups and related ventures. At least three of the company’s early employees – former CEO Travis Kalanick, Ryan Graves, and Garrett Camp – are now billionaires.

Here’s what 12 of Uber’s earliest employees are doing now.


Oscar Salazar

source
Ben Hider/Getty Images for Concordia Summit

Employed by Uber from: 2009 to 2011

Former position at Uber: Founding Member

Where he is now: Although there’s some dispute about it, early Uber documentation refers to Salazar as a cofounder of the company. He and cofounder Garrett Camp attended business school together, then built Uber’s first prototype with another school friend, Conrad Whelan.

Salazar departed the company amicably soon after it launched. Besides being an active investor in companies like Egyptian motorcycle and tuk-tuk ride-hailing startup Halan, he has launched other companies like Pager, which sends a doctor or nurse to you with a tap of your phone, and Ride, a carpooling app for commuters.

More recently, he launched Ogon LLC, an advisory firm to companies like Rubicon Global Inc., ALEX AND ANI, and Sontra Cargo.

Salazar has a roughly $250 million stake in Uber and is expected to sell about $10 million worth of shares, Bloomberg reported in April.


Curtis Chambers

source
YouTube/Screenshot

Employed by Uber from: 2010 to 2017

Former position at Uber: Director of Engineering

Where he is now: Before Uber, Chambers helped build Expensify, the popular online expense-reports startup, as well as contributing to open-source Drupal and Django. As Uber’s seventh employee, Chambers worked on UberEATS and later became the director of engineering for Uber’s trucking operation, the position he held when he left the company in 2017.

On both Twitter and LinkedIn, Chambers now describes himself as a “Professional Dad.”


Austin Geidt

Employed by Uber from: 2010 to present

Position at Uber: Head of Strategy for Uber’s Advanced Technologies Group

Where she is now: Geidt started at Uber as an “overdressed” intern and employee number four; she says she struggled for the first months. At first, her job wasn’t well defined and saw her moving from handing out flyers to passersby to cold-calling drivers.

In the past, she has also been open about her history with drug addiction and recovery.

Geidt has moved up as Uber has grown. Since 2016, she’s been the head of strategy for Uber’s Advanced Technologies Group, which deals with self-driving technology.

On May 10, 2019, the day of Uber’s IPO, Geidt was one the one to ring the opening bell at the New York Stock Exchange.


Ryan Graves

source
REUTERS/Beck Diefenbach

Employed by Uber from: 2010 to 2017

Position at Uber: Former SVP Global Operations, current Board Member

Where he is now: Graves was Uber’s first employee and first CEO, a job he got by answering a tweet by cofounder Travis Kalanick. He previously worked in a database-administrator position at General Electric before landing a stint at Foursquare that he acquired by working for them for free after the company initially turned him down.

After seven years at the company, Graves left his position as SVP of Global Operations in 2017, but he stayed on as a member of the Board of Directors.

In January 2018, he founded investment firm Saltwater Capital, which has backed meditation app Calm and the Fort Point Beer Company.

Graves owns more than $100 million worth of shares in Uber and has a total net worth of about $1.5 billion, according to Forbes. He’s pledged to donate a portion of his IPO windfall to charity.


Garrett Camp

source
Flickr/Joi

Employed by Uber from: 2009 to present

Position at Uber: Cofounder, Board Member

Where he is now: Before Uber, Camp created the popular website StumbleUpon.

He then founded Uber with Travis Kalanick and later became the company’s second CEO. He’s been on the Board of Directors since its beginnings, sometimes as chairman and other times as just a board member.

Camp later created his own startup studio called Expa, which works with founders to help them build and grow their own companies.

Camp, who owns about 5% of Uber, is the company’s second-largest individual shareholder; his stake has a value of $3.7 billion, according to Bloomberg. Forbes estimates his total net worth at $4.2 billion.


Jordan Bonnet

source
Jordan Bonnet/Twitter

Employed by Uber from: 2010 to 2018

Former position at Uber: Senior Engineer

Where he is now: Bonnet was the third engineer to join Uber and the first mobile (both iOS and Android) engineer. He has worked on many launches, including Uber + Spotify. He now lives in Paris.

Bonnet left Uber in 2018 to join SAUV Life, a non-profit initiative in collaboration with Uber France.

According to LinkedIn, in March 2019 Bonnet joined a company called Dark Kitchen as director of engineering, and he’s also an operating partner at venture capitalist firm Founders Future.


Domenic Narducci

caption
Domenic Narducci, left, in Uber’s headquarters.
source
Alyson Shontell/Business Insider

Employed by Uber from: 2011 to present

Position at Uber: Software Developer

Where he is now: Narducci joined Uber as an intern when it was still UberCab – before San Francisco forced the name change. Since then he has moved around between different teams including the Driver Technology Platform team and the STARCRAFT team.

He’s now a security engineer on the Product Security team.


Scott Munro

source
Scott Munro/LinkedIn

Employed by Uber from: 2011 to 2016

Former position at Uber: Technical Program Manager, Realtime Platform

Where he is now: Munro started his career as a banking analyst, according to LinkedIn, but transitioned to business development with the iOS development service Catappult before starting at Uber. He moved up in operations as the company grew and eventually became the Technical Program Manager of Uber’s realtime systems.

He left the company in April 2016, according to LinkedIn.


Ryan McKillen

source
Ryan McKillen/LinkedIn

Employed by Uber from: 2010 to 2017

Former position at Uber: Software Engineer, Product Manager

Where he is now: McKillen was Uber’s third employee, starting as a software engineer. He moved up to head Uber’s engineering team in New York City and later became the Product Manager of autonomous vehicle operations.

According to LinkedIn and other social media accounts, McKillen left the company in February 2017 and now lives in Miami. He was present at the New York Stock Exchange for Uber’s IPO.


Conrad Whelan

source
YouTube/Screenshot

Employed by Uber from: 2010 to 2016

Former position at Uber: Engineering Manager

Where he is now: Whelan became Uber’s first engineer after moving to San Francisco from his native Calgary, Canada. He built the sign-up flows that allowed Uber to actually have any users. After the Uber launch, he worked on optimizing the dispatch algorithms, and he was responsible for building out a full product-development team in the Netherlands before leaving the company in 2016.

Since he left Uber, Whelan has been producing films and focusing on investing and working in film, tech, and philanthropy, according to his LinkedIn. In December, he donated $5 million to the public library system in his hometown of Calgary.

In March 2019, he joined Neurocast, a MedTech company that analyzes keystrokes to measure fatigue, as a senior technical advisor. Whelan is also on the board of directors of PK Sound, a Canadian sound manufacturing and event company.


Rachel Holt

source
MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images

Employed by Uber from: 2011 to present

Position at Uber: Vice President of New Mobility

Where she is now: After getting an MBA from Stanford, Holt moved across the country to DC to be with her boyfriend (now husband). She answered a job listing to launch Uber in DC and 10 days later, Uber did its first DC ride. The market turned out to be one of Uber’s most combative and the first where it had regulatory issues.

In 2016, Holt was promoted to regional general manager for Uber in the US and Canada.

Since then, she’s moved up to Vice President of New Mobility, a position that handles Uber’s efforts in the areas of bikes, scooters, transit, and hourly rentals.


Travis Kalanick

caption
Travis Kalanick and his father at the New York Stock Exchange for Uber’s IPO.
source
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Employed by Uber from: 2009 to 2017

Former position at Uber: Cofounder, former CEO

Where he is now: Travis Kalanick launched a startup called UberCab in 2009 that evolved into one of the most successful tech companies in the world.

The former CEO left Uber in 2017 after a disastrous year for the company and sold off a sizeable portion of his stake to Softbank, which made him $1.4 billion. But he still owns about 7% of the company, making him the largest individual shareholder.

Kalanick remained on the board after he left Uber and went on to set up an investment fund and become the CEO of City Storage Systems.

Today, Kalanick is worth an estimated $5.4 billion and is likely about to be worth a lot more with Uber’s IPO.

He showed up at Uber’s IPO event and was greeted with cheers and applause.

Maya Kosoff contributed to an earlier version of this story.