Ungracious? Singaporeans have been ranked the 4th kindest travellers in Apac

Other acts of kindness include offering to switch seats with another passenger so that they can sit with their travel companion, something 32 per cent of Singapore respondents said  they had done before.
Pixabay

Although going on a holiday means you can relax and let loose, it seems Singaporeans know how important it is to be kind.

In fact, Singaporeans have been setting a good example, and have been ranked the fourth kindest travellers in the Asia Pacific, smashing the commonly-held stereotype that they are an ugly, ungracious bunch.

According to a study released by Expedia on Wednesday (June 19), helping someone with their luggage was the most commonly-practiced act of kindness among Singaporeans on a flight, with 42 per cent of respondents indicating that they had done so before.

The Global Flight & Hotel Etiquette Study, which surveyed a total of 18,000 adult travellers in 23 countries, including 600 Singaporeans, ranked Australians as the kindest travellers in the region.

Half of Australia’s respondents said that they had helped someone with their luggage on a flight before. This was followed by runner-up New Zealand (46 per cent) and India (44 per cent), which ranked third on the list.

Malaysia, which tied with Taiwan in sixth place, had 39 per cent of respondents saying that they have helped someone with their luggage in a flight.

Other acts of kindness include offering to switch seats with another passenger so that they can sit with their travel companion, something 32 per cent of Singapore respondents said they had done before.

Another 20 per cent said that they have also shared travel tips and recommendations with a stranger on a flight before, Expedia said.

Singaporeans most annoyed by drunks and seat-kickers

While Singaporeans try to be as accommodating as possible on a flight, there are also certain kinds of passengers who get on their nerves.

In particular, 41 percent of respondents said they found drunk passengers and seat-kickers the most annoying.

This was followed by “germ spreaders” – passengers who are visibly sick and can spread the disease – with 37 per cent of respondents getting annoyed with them.

The third most annoying type of passengers were inattentive parents, whom 26 per cent of respondents found annoying, the study revealed.

When encountering passengers who kick their seat, 34 per cent of respondents said that they preferred to speak directly to the perpetrator, while 30 per cent said they would ask the flight attendant for help instead.

Smelly neighbours

According to Expedia, the Singaporean travellers generally have “low tolerance” when encountering a seatmate that smells extremely bad, with 59 per cent of respondents saying that they would request for a seat change.

Meanwhile, only 18 per cent of respondents would try to put up with the smell by covering their noses, while 17 per cent said they would breathe through their mouths instead.

Similarly, when respondents encountered a coughing or sneezing seatmate, close to half (49 per cent) would request to change their seat.

About 43 per cent of respondents said that they would offer the affected seatmate tissues or cough drops, and another 31 per cent said they would put something over their mouths or nose to prevent themselves from getting infected.

Read also: