Walmart blasts Trump administration’s ‘disturbing’ detainment of migrant children in one of its former stores

A former Walmart store in Brownsville, Texas, is now being used to house nearly 1,500 migrant children detained by the federal government.

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A former Walmart store in Brownsville, Texas, is now being used to house nearly 1,500 migrant children detained by the federal government.
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Administration for Children and Families at the US Department of Health and Human Services

  • Walmart on Tuesday attacked the Trump administration’s detainment of migrant children in one of its former stores.
  • “We had no idea our former store would be used for such a disturbing purpose,” Walmart tweeted. “We are just as shocked and disappointed as you are.”
  • The supercenter in Brownsville, Texas, closed in 2016.
  • It’s now housing nearly 1,500 migrant children who were separated from their parents at the border or who arrived in the United States unaccompanied.
  • The separations are part of the Trump administration’s new “zero tolerance” policy against illegal immigration.

Walmart on Tuesday attacked the Trump administration’s detainment of migrant children in one of its former stores.

The company said on Twitter that it was “shocked and disappointed” that its former store in Brownsville, Texas, was being used to house children who had been separated from their parents at the Mexico border.

The separations are part of the Trump administration’s new “zero tolerance” policy against illegal immigration.

“We had no idea our former store would be used for such a disturbing purpose, A.L.,” Walmart tweeted Tuesday in response to a Twitter user who called for a boycott against the company. “We are just as shocked and disappointed as you are.”

The tweet that prompted Walmart’s response said: “@walmart THESE CHILDREN ARE HOUSED IN @walmart !! #Boycott!!”

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Twitter

The Brownsville store, a Supercenter that Walmart closed in 2016, is now known as Casa Padre. It houses nearly 1,500 migrant boys ages 10 to 17, some of whom were separated from their parents at the Mexico border.

The facility is one of approximately 100 shelters the federal Office of Refugee Resettlement is using to hold more than 11,000 children in 17 states.