What you need to know in advertising today

CEO of AOL Tim Armstrong attends the Allen & Co Media Conference in Sun Valley, Idaho July 12, 2012.

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CEO of AOL Tim Armstrong attends the Allen & Co Media Conference in Sun Valley, Idaho July 12, 2012.
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REUTERS/Jim Urquhart

WPP is looking for a replacement for departed CEO Sir Martin Sorrell – and Oath CEO Tim Armstrong is on the list.

But the two sides haven’t started talking yet, according to people familiar with the matter.

The advertising agency holding company has tapped the executive recruiting firm Russell Reynolds to search for a replacement for Sorrell, who stepped down last month amidst accusations of improper behavior.

Armstrong, who previously ran AOL before it was sold to Verizon in 2015, is on Russell Reynolds’ list. But WPP has yet to talk to Armstrong.

And Armstrong may not be interested. He appeared to imply that he was staying at Oath with a tweet Monday morning, saying he was “totally focused & engaged on building our 1 billion consumer brand ecosystem out and getting @Yahoo @AOL & all brands to growth mode @verizon.”

To read more, click here.

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